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View Poll Results: Do you avoid restaurants that apply a service charge?

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  • I avoid these restaurants.

    2 11.11%
  • I eat anywhere the food is good.

    16 88.89%
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Thread: Do You Avoid Restaurants That Apply A Service Charge?

  1. #1
    Senior Member AndyM's Avatar
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    Do You Avoid Restaurants That Apply A Service Charge?

    Recent discussions have raised this question in my mind. Please vote in the poll and feel free to elaborate in a post.

  2. #2
    Senior Member AndyM's Avatar
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    I search for great restaurants. I read reviews, read the posts on this forum and decide. I want restaurants where I can get a great meal. The service charge does not enter into the decision making process any more than the color of the furniture.

  3. #3
    Aruba since 1979
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    we eat where the food is good.....
    and if there is a service charge, so be it.
    if the service is good to excellent we tip additionally 5- 10% more directly to our waiter.
    how he/she chooses to divide it or not is not our concern.

    if the service is lousy or mediocre, no additional tip.

  4. #4
    CK1
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    I voted:
    I eat anywhere the food is good.

    Quality food is always important to me.

    I believe, the 15% Service Charge goes to the owner of the restaurant to offset the costs for his staff like cook, seating hostess and waiters and he decides how much each of them will receive.

    To award a waiter/waitress for good service, I would give him/her the tip as cash (not added to the credit card).

  5. #5
    Senior Member act1966's Avatar
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    To be honest, the poll is a little leading. The responses should reflect your feelings on service charges all things being equal.

    All things being the same: food, ambiance, location quality etc. and it came down to two restaurants, would you go to the one with the service charge or the one without?

    I'm a strong believer in tipping freedom or the European model. If the service and food are lousy, how would you feel about the service charge then?
    Last edited by act1966; 11-30-2015 at 11:53 PM.

  6. #6
    Aruba since 1979
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    if the food and service were lousy AND the 15% service charge was added in...............i would hope that my husband and i would speak with the manager and express our unhappiness at being charged that 15% and would ask it be deleted from the bill. that being said, the service would have to be pretty crummy.

    i like the european model too.

    a few years ago, we were a group of 10 on easter sunday that dined at maggianos in tampa.
    the food was great, the service was horrible and the waiter assigned to us had a miserable disposition and a surely attitude and was incompetent. his incompetence was his best trait.
    our group, since we were a group of more than 6, we were charged the 15% service charge.
    the spokesperson of our group, spoke with the manager numerous times thru the meal and told him how bad the service was. nothing was done to give us a new wait person and the bill including alcoholic beverages was almost $1000. we never did pay the 15% and it was removed from our bill. the kid that refilled the roll baskets and water glasses got $60 in cash.
    Quote Originally Posted by act1966 View Post
    To be honest, the poll is a little leading. The responses should reflect your feelings on service charges all things being equal.

    All things being the same: food, ambiance, location quality etc. and it came down to two restaurants, would you go to the one with the service charge or the one without?

    I'm a strong believer in tipping freedom or the European model. If the service and food are lousy, how would you feel about the service charge then?

  7. #7
    CK1
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    The European model.
    For instance: France

    In France, a 15% service charge is automatically included in cafe and restaurant bills. This money is not given directly to the waiter but to the restaurant owner who pays his staff a fixed salary.

    A 15% service charge is added to the bill but not given to the waiter

    Interesting read. For more info:

    http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-28793677

  8. #8
    CK1
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    More of the European model:

    Austria

    At Restaurants you should round up the bill, or tip 5-10%. Tip in cash, handing the tip directly to the server, or tell the server how much the bill should be (including tip) before he or she makes change. For instance if the bill is 52 Euros and you give the server 60 euros, tell the server “8 euros”



    France

    Tipping in France is not compulsory but is recommended. The bill in restaurants and cafés usually includes a 15 percent tip. It is referred to “service compris.” However, it is customary to leave some small change unless you are dissatisfied. If the service is not included in the price, “service non compris,” a 15 percent tip is customary. However, in chic restaurants, leave a generous tip.



    Germany

    In Germany, a service charge of 15% is included in the menu price in restaurants, cafés and bars. But it is typical to “round up” the amount to an even figure. A rule of thumb is to add 3-5%, generally ending with a full Euro amount. German waiters and waitresses are paid a salary and do not live off of tips as do their American counterparts but it never hurts to be generous.
    Be sure to ask for your check; they will not present a bill until asked. And, do not leave the tip on the table; give it to your waiter when you pay.



    Italy

    In most restaurants, you may find both “il coperto” and “servizio incluso” written on the menu. “Il coperto” is the cover charge, which is generally one or two Euro, and which takes care of things like bread before the meal and a glass of tap water. “Servizio incluso” means that service is included, meaning they’ve already figured in a tip for you – it’s usually around 15% – so the total due on your final bill is all you’ll owe. If the service has been particularly outstanding or you’ve had a great experience, you can compliment the waiter by rounding up or leaving a couple Euro on the table.

    Tipping after a meal is only done if you don’t see “servizio incluso” on the menu, or you specifically see “servizio non incluso” (service not included). In those situations, a 10% tip is fine, left in cash on the table or handed right to your waiter.
    Netherlands

    In The Netherlands, Value Added Tax and service charges are included in your check in hotels, shops and taxis. Unlike in the US, this is even the case for your restaurant check. Tips for extra service are always appreciated but not necessary.

    It is customary to give taxi drivers and waiters a tip of about 10 percent.
    Many public restrooms have an attendant who is usually tipped EUR 0.50.



    Spain

    In every single establishment in Spain, service is included with the price of the meal or drink. However, tipping is a common practice at bars and restaurants, hotels, and taxis, depending on the total price for the service, and on the generosity of the client. It is usually around five to ten percent of the total price.



    Switzerland

    At Restaurants, a service charge is built into menu prices. However, it is customary to round up amounts when paying the waiter or waitress if you’re happy with the service. This means that you might hand the server CHF 50 for a CHF 47 meal. If you’re paying by credit card, hand the server a cash tip of up to 5%.



    United Kingdom

    Tipping is generally un-necessary in the UK, but if you feel the service was good and you want to show your appreciation, you certainly may.
    Hotels: Most hotel bills include a service charge, usually 10-12%. For rooms, you can leave an optional amount to room staff.
    Restaurants
    : Many restaurant bills include a service charge; make sure you check the bill to avoid tipping twice. Where a service charge is not included, it is customary to leave a tip of 10-15% of the bill. Some restaurants now include a suggested tip in the bill total.
    Taxis: 10-15% of the fare
    Porterage: discretionary



    Bottom Line

    In Europe, the rule of thumb is to simply round up. If you are happy with the service, a tip of 5% is good and a tip of 10% is generous.

    http://europeupclose.com/article/tipping-in-europe/

  9. #9
    Super Moderator Jacki's Avatar
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    Maybe I'm too easy going. I go where I want to go. If there is a service charge, I pay it. If there isn't, I still pay 20-25% over (usually, of course dependent on service received)
    Jacki ~ loving Aruba from NJ

  10. #10
    Senior Member cpjones's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrea J. View Post
    we eat where the food is good.....
    and if there is a service charge, so be it.
    if the service is good to excellent we tip additionally 5- 10% more directly to our waiter.
    how he/she chooses to divide it or not is not our concern.

    if the service is lousy or mediocre, no additional tip.

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