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Thread: iguana? goat stew?

  1. #1
    Aruba since 1979
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    iguana? goat stew?

    anyone ever try iguana? goat stew?
    or other aruban or caribbean faire?
    keshi yena?

    where?

  2. #2
    Senior Member EHampite's Avatar
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    Our son and his friend tried the iguana soup at Nos Cunucu - they said it was delicious except that all the meat had the bones still in it, so they had to pick through it. Ugh! They said "it tastes like chicken"! I tried keshi yena at both Nos Cunucu and Tulip - of the two, my preference was Tulip. Very good!

  3. #3
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    unsure if you are right or wrong re: iguanas.
    i too heard long ago that killing them was outlawed.

    i am not promoting killing them and or promoting "trying them".

    i am asking, anyone ever tried it or any other "different" kind of food that is not quite the norm for tourists?

    Quote Originally Posted by Schnauzerjoy View Post
    Did killing the Iguanas not get prohibited more than 15 years ago?.
    I am under the impression that it is and that any restaurant can get a huge fine or even be closed if they serve them.
    Please let me know if I am wrong, but if not, it is definitely not right to promote it here and any restaurant serving it should be reported.
    Carsten

  4. #4
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    Yorkshire Post (year old article)

    (makes mention of it being illegal to hunt and kill them)

    Small is beautiful


    Published on Friday 30 April 2010 09:53

    Lizzie Murphy discovers what makes Aruba one of the most enticing islands in the Caribbean.

    Iguana soup. We had asked for a traditional Aruban delicacy and here it was. In all its revolting glory.

    There was just one member of our group brave enough to try it and it wasn't a pretty sight. The iguana had clearly decided to make it as difficult as possible for the diner, and a mixture of little bones and tough flesh meant it looked more like a bush tucker trial than a culinary delight.

    But Aruban food should not be judged by iguana soup. In fact, according to our guide, the animal is an endangered species and it's actually illegal to hunt and kill them. Maybe that's why it was a "special" rather than a fixture on the main menu at local Papiamento restaurant Nos Cunucu.

    The restaurant, an old Aruban farmhouse situated down a backstreet north of the capital Oranjestad, typically serves authentic Creole Aruban cuisine, such as goat stew, cornbread pancakes and chicken and pumpkin soup, in friendly surroundings.

    Vegetarians like myself are not naturally catered for in Aruba, which typically serves steaks, fish and seafood. However, the restaurants we went to were happy to create a tasty, if unadventurous, meat-free meal when warned in advance.

    Charlie's Bar, a meeting place filled with decades of international memorabilia, particularly stood out for its creative vegetarian thinking. Although there wasn't an option on the menu, the chef created a delicious bean and lentil stew.

    The romantic Bucuti Beach Resort also came up trumps, creating a meat-free version of the traditional Keshi Yena (a type of chicken casserole) for me when we visited its beach-side restaurant. Passions Beach Bar and Restaurant and Pinchos Grill and Bar were also favourites among our group. The tiny island of Aruba, which measures just 19 miles by six, is the western-most of the Dutch Antilles, 15 miles off the northern coast of Venezuela. It is generally a well-kept secret in the UK, although American tourists have been coming in their droves for decades. This month Thomson is launching direct flights from Manchester to encourage more UK visitors.

    The Dutch captured the island from the Spanish in 1636. Today the American influence can be seen in the shape of huge casinos and fast food chains such as Wendy's, Taco Bell and McDonald's, it's easy to see why certain parts of Aruba have been compared to Las Vegas. But away from the bright lights is a stunning mix of natural beauty powdery white sand, vivid turquoise waters and the Arikok National Park, located in the north-eastern part of Aruba.

    Temperatures typically hover around the 30-degree mark, with very little rain even in the wet season there is a constant light breeze, and it's also out of the hurricane belt.

    The beaches and watersports are the main attractions. We also went on a four-hour snorkelling trip on a catamaran which took us to three different sites around the island, including the striking Second World War Antilla shipwreck, which, at 400 feet long, is one of the Caribbean's largest shipwrecks and now home to many marine life forms, including an abundance of tropical fish. But there is also plenty to keep active visitors occupied. A drive round the island will take you to all the key points of interest, including the California Lighthouse, churches and several natural bridges. For the adventurous, a bone-rattling off-roading experience along the rugged north west coast is recommended. You will also notice the famous divi-divi trees, which have come to symbolise the island. The twisted tree is permanently bent towards the west, in the direction of the trade winds. Handily this is also the direction of all the island's hotels so lost tourists need only follow the direction of the bent trees to find their way home.

    There are a few museums including the Aruba Aloe Museum and Factory where visitors can see the production process first hand from aloe vera leaf to finished Aruba Aloe lotions. The aloe industry is the island's oldest. The aloe vera plant was introduced in Aruba in 1840 and went on to cover two-thirds of Aruba's surface. The island went on to become the world's largest aloe exporter, and although that is no longer so, the products are unique to the island.

    If you could design the perfect Caribbean island, you would probably create a place like Aruba. It's no wonder that its slogan, which also appears on every car number plate, is One Happy Island. Just stay away from the iguana soup.

  5. #5
    Senior Member corona's Avatar
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    This discussion made me curious about Iguana soup, although I really don't think I'd ever be adventurous enough to try it. It does seem to be illegal, but I can't find a definitive answer except on blogs.

    they were widely considered a delicacy in Aruba, and were made into a variety of soups and stews. It is now illegal to hunt iguanas and any restaurant caught serving them can be fined and possibly shut down.
    http://www.go2aruba.net/dynamics/art...htmlpage2.html

    As far as goat stew, I've had a relative to the goat, an antelope. My husband shot one out west several years ago. We have eaten a lot of different game, because my husband is a hunter and we eat what he kills. However, the antelope smelled terrible and tasted worse. Sadly, we couldn't eat it, and the meat went to waste. We've been told that antelope is actually quite good, so we think it may have been mishandled by the meat packer we used.
    No Shirt, No Shoes, No Problem
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    It is illegal to hunt iguanas, period. This is a law since more than 15 years old. As it is illegal to kill turtles and conch too. Only imported canned turtle meat and imported conch meat are permitted. If caught selling a local product of any of these animals you run the chance to be fined and/or having your establishment closed. So, if these items are offered, you should report them to the authorities. Thank you.

  7. #7
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    thanks ommi

    Quote Originally Posted by Ommi View Post
    It is illegal to hunt iguanas, period. This is a law since more than 15 years old. As it is illegal to kill turtles and conch too. Only imported canned turtle meat and imported conch meat are permitted. If caught selling a local product of any of these animals you run the chance to be fined and/or having your establishment closed. So, if these items are offered, you should report them to the authorities. Thank you.

  8. #8
    Senior Member SanNic44's Avatar
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    Goat stew (cabrito stoba) is frequently on the menu at Pueblito Paisa in San Nicolaas. Can't say I like it much myself, but it's there to try if you're interested.

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    eat iguana stew each visit, made by friend's, just had couple bowl's wednesday night.

  10. #10
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    OLD thread.........resurrecting

    well, who has tried iguana?
    (yes killing iguanas in aruba is unlawful)

    15 or 20 years ago it was not unlawful so maybe someone with a recollection can answer
    what does it taste like ?
    i know......tastes like chicken !?!?!

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