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Thread: Necessary to register marriage in US?

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    Necessary to register marriage in US?

    Hi everyone,

    I got married in Aruba in August and am going through the process of getting my name changed (banks, SS, driver's license, etc). Is there any advantage or reason to "register" my marriage in the US? And if so, how would one go about doing this?

    Thanks,
    Mac

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    Marriage of U.S. Citizens Abroad



    Who May Perform Marriages Abroad American diplomatic and consular officers are NOT permitted to perform marriages (Title 22, Code of Federal Regulations 52.1). Marriages abroad are almost always performed by local (foreign) civil or religious officials.
    As a rule, marriages are not performed on the premises of an American embassy or consulate. The validity of marriages abroad is not dependent upon the presence of an American diplomatic or consular officer, but upon adherence to the laws of the country where the marriage is performed. Consular officers may authenticate foreign marriage documents. The fee for authentication of a document is $32.00.



    Validity of Marriages Abroad
    In general, marriages which are legally performed and valid abroad are also legally valid in the United States. Inquiries regarding the validity of a marriage abroad should be directed to the attorney general of the state in the United States where the parties to the marriage live.



    Foreign Laws and Procedures
    The embassy or tourist information bureau of the country in which the marriage is to be performed is the best source of information about marriage in that country. Some general information on marriage in a limited number of countries can be obtained from Overseas Citizens Services, Room 4811, Department of State, Washington, DC 20520. In addition, American embassies and consulates abroad frequently have information about marriage in the country in which they are located.



    Residence Requirements
    Marriages abroad are subject to the residency requirements of the country in which the marriage is to be performed. There is almost always a lengthy waiting period.



    Documentation and Authentication
    Most countries require that a valid U.S. passport be presented. In addition, birth certificates, divorce decrees, and death certificates are frequently required. Some countries require that the documents presented to the marriage registrar first be authenticated in the United States by a consular official of that country. This process can be time consuming and expensive.



    Parental Consent
    The age of majority for marriage varies from one country to another. Persons under the age of 18 must, as a general rule, present a written statement of consent executed by their parents before a notary public. Some countries require the parental consent statement to be authenticated by a consular official of that foreign country in the United States.



    Affidavit of Eligibility to Marry
    All civil law countries require proof of legal capacity to enter into a marriage contract in the form of certification by competent authority that no impediment exists to the marriage. No such document exists in the United States. Unless the foreign authorities will allow such a statement to be executed before one of their consular officials in the United States, it will be necessary for the parties to a prospective marriage abroad to execute an affidavit at the American embassy or consulate in the country in which the marriage will occur stating that they are free to marry. This is called an affidavit of eligibility to marry and the fee for the American consular officer''s certification of the affidavit is $55.00, subject to change. Some countries also require witnesses who will execute affidavits to the effect that the parties are free to marry.



    Additional Requirements
    Many countries, like the United States, require blood tests.
    Some countries require that documents presented to the marriage registrar be translated into the native language of that country.


    Loss of U.S. Nationality
    In some countries, marriage to a national of that country will automatically make the spouse either a citizen of that country or eligible to become naturalized in that country expeditiously. The automatic acquisition of a second nationality will not affect U.S. citizenship. However, naturalization in a foreign country on one''s own application or the application of a duly authorized agent may cause the loss of American citizenship. Persons planning to apply for a foreign nationality should contact an American embassy or consulate for further information.



    Marriage to an Alien
    Information on obtaining a visa for a foreign spouse may be obtained from any office of the Bureau of Citizenship and Immigration Services in the Department of Homeland Security, U.S. embassies and consulates abroad, or the Department of State Visa Office, Washington, DC 20520-0113. General information regarding visas may be obtained by calling the Visa Office on 202-663-1225 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting 202-663-1225 end_of_the_skype_highlighting.


    http://travel.state.gov/law/family_i...riage_589.html

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    Senior Member Arubalisa's Avatar
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    I was married in the Bahamas, and never had to do a stitch of paperwork.

    Here in the U.S. it was not until some years later that I chose to take on my husband's last name.

    I was successful in changing my social security card, drivers license as well as passing a state background check and fingerprinting, for which a marriage certificate was required as part of the documentation.

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    Quote Originally Posted by macbosnia View Post
    Hi everyone,

    I got married in Aruba in August and am going through the process of getting my name changed (banks, SS, driver's license, etc). Is there any advantage or reason to "register" my marriage in the US? And if so, how would one go about doing this?

    Thanks,
    Mac
    You probably had to provide a lot of documents to get married in Aruba. You can look up on your Marriage License the part where it says "By the power of... provided to me (clerk)... I perform this marriage ceremony..." This is the part which makes it legally binding for the US.

    You could ask at your local City Hall if you need to "register" with them in addition.

    Being married is an important part when filing your income taxes, for example. Or applying for a credit card etc.

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    Member Robert's Avatar
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    If you do not register your marriage back home they will never know you are married, important to my opnion to do the registration.

    Regards,
    Robert
    Robert Arenz weddingplanner and professional photographer
    http://www.photographyaruba.com http://www.dreamweddingsaruba.com

  6. #6
    Senior Member Arubalisa's Avatar
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    Seriously? I would not even know "who to tell" , who to register with.

    Here in the U.S., the state of Georgia wanted proof specifically that I was married for a background check. They needed to see a marriage license/certificate.

    They were fine with the Bahamian marriage license. I cannot think of any reason why an Arubian license would be different.

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    I’m not sure if this is what you are wondering, but at my local county clerk, I am going to have my marriage license “recorded”. It doesn’t validate the marriage, but it records it in the county records as well as puts it in the newspaper as it does when they record a marriage certificate done in the local courthouse.

    It is also good to have incase if something happens to the original and you need a certified copy.

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    Also, my local DMV told me that they wanted the county recorders copy to do my name change.

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    Senior Member luvsun's Avatar
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    I don't think I registered our marriage either? I would think that if SS and DMV have it recorded that would of been enough?? It took 4 times going back to DMV to get my name changed on my license, they were not accepting Aruba's papers. I finally got someone I knew and she pushed (and I mean pushed) it through. It was crazy, especially since I had my new SS card.
    March 2 will be our 2 year anniversary..... :-D

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    Senior Member Arubalisa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by luvsun View Post
    especially since I had my new SS card.
    March 2 will be our 2 year anniversary..... :-D
    Happy anniversary!

    It blows my mind that they would not change the drivers license with the new social security card already in hand.

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