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Thread: By Otmar Oduber's/Aruba's Hotel Vision

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    Senior Member Arubalisa's Avatar
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    By Otmar Oduber's/Aruba's Hotel Vision


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    When the Radisson was on the verge of being sold to the RIU many many folks...Arubans and tourists alike cried "Foul".
    It seemed that so many (the majority of folks that were verbal) were totally against the All Inclusive.

    When the Radisson was sold to Hilton it was announced that it would not be All Inclusive.

    Seems like now.........many are upset that Minister Oduber is proposing a moratorium on All Inclusives.

    I like that folks have choices in Aruba. Many love AI and many love the European Plan.
    I like too that folks are able to dine at and support locally owned restaurants.

    Aruba is pretty safe. It is very likely that you will wander away from your resort (unlike some places in the DR and MX), so it is likely that one would love to dine at the local places.

    I do not try to figure out Aruba politics. Someday if i master US politics I might try to understand Aruba.

    I give the Minister an A+ for trying.

  3. #3
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    as an addendum to my opinion:

    in aruba we have stayed at numerous resorts.
    we HAVE done all inclusive @ Renaissance Ocean Suites, Tamarijn, DivAI, and way way back at the Holiday Inn.
    we enjoyed the AI and enjoyed the conveniences of it.

    we have not done AI in recent years.

  4. #4
    Senior Member danadog56's Avatar
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    It is very understandable that the Aruban Gov't wants to put a cap on the amount of AI's on the island. The local restaurants depend on tourism and could not survive if too many hotels were AI. I have not used/stayed at an AI, so my opinion is somewhat biased, but I also understand both points.
    We go out to dinner but since we have a TS it is cheaper to eat in, especially for breakfast and lunch (if not cruising the island looking for fun and excitement). Dinner is mostly in but we do have our favs and frequent them each trip as well as picking one or two "newbies".
    Hopefully a balance will be worked out so there is the best of both worlds and tourism does not suffer for it.
    ARUBA....HOME AWAY FROM HOME

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    Super Moderator Jacki's Avatar
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    Balance is good for the AIs, the local restaurants, the hotel business & tourism in general.
    Jacki ~ loving Aruba from NJ

  6. #6
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    From
    Travel Weekly

    Aruba mulls cap on percentage of all-inclusives


    By Gay Nagle Myers / June 21, 2016



    2







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    How many is too many when it comes to all-inclusive resorts on one island destination?
    On Aruba, where travel and tourism contributes 91% of the island's GDP, all-inclusive resorts currently make up 34% of Aruba's 5,543 transient rooms while 66% are European Plan (EP) hotels, i.e. properties that do not include food and beverage in the room rates.
    It's a mix that has served, until now, as the foundation of Aruba's overall tourism industry development.
    But concerns that the current ratio of all-inclusive to EP resorts is outdated and limits the number of guests who make use of local restaurants, and to foster what it describes as a balanced portfolio of on-island accommodations, the Aruban government has submitted legislation to Parliament that would cap the all-inclusive sector at 40% of total room inventory.
    The legislation would also place an annual cap of 20% on all-inclusive room nights sold by EP hotels.
    The decision to cap the growth of all-inclusive resorts stems, in part, from concerns voiced by Otmar Oduber, the minister of tourism, transportation, primary sector and culture, over the conversion of existing EP hotels on Palm Beach into all-inclusives, including the Riu Palace Antillas, which opened in October 2014 as a conversion of the former Westin Aruba.
    Aruba currently has seven all-inclusive resorts: In addition to the Riu Palace Antillas there's the Divi Aruba All Inclusive, the Divi Village All Inclusive Villas, the Riu Palace Aruba, the Occidental Grand Aruba, Tamarijn Aruba All Inclusive and the Tamarijn Aruba All Inclusive Suites at Dutch Village.
    Planned openings include Bahia's Luxury Baby Beach Don Pablo Collection in 2017 and Zoetry Isla Di Oro in 2018, which would shift the balance at or close to the proposed 40% cap.
    Both the Caribbean Hotel and Tourism Association (CHTA) and the Aruba Hotel and Tourism Association have urged Aruba prime minister Michiel Eman to abandon the legislation. The groups argued it would be counterproductive to the health and growth of the tourism industry and would reverse the progress the destination has made in recent years. According to CHTA CEO and director general Frank Comito, the legislation would negatively impact employment levels, the cost and availability of airlift and government revenues and would reverse Aruba's growth in the global tourism arena.
    Comito said that excessive government interference in free enterprise "typically erodes business confidence, increases operating costs and stifles investment."
    The CHTA also pointed out that the high-spending traveler represents the fastest growing market segment turning to all-inclusives.
    "These travelers spend time and money outside of the hotel property and will spend more if enticed," the CHTA said, referencing Ernst & Young's 2014 Global Hospitality Insights Report, which cites the changing demographics of travelers, who are attracted to all-inclusive resorts at all price points.
    The government and the Aruba Tourism Authority conducted analysis and research on the subject before the legislation went before Parliament; one key takeaway was that the offering of all-inclusive accommodations was less relevant to travelers than the quality of Aruba's beaches, culinary offerings and natural sites.
    "We have a responsibility to analyze and apply this research to Aruba's policy," Oduber said.
    Aruba's goal "is not to completely eliminate all-inclusive resorts, as we understand this market is considered to be the fastest-growing segment of the leisure travel industry in the next 10 years," said Ronella Tjin-Asjoe Croes, CEO of the Aruba Tourism Authority.
    The goal is to remain competitive and create balance "while re-evaluating the policy every five years to ensure Aruba's best interests continue to be met," Croes said. "A healthy mix of on-island accommodations is crucial to the success of Aruba."
    Aruba's visitor figures indicate growth in recent years, up about 14% in 2015, when the island welcomed 1.2 million visitors; figures from Q1 2016 indicate a 5.4% overall growth over the same period in 2015.


    More From Caribbean Insight

    Last edited by Andrea J.; 06-21-2016 at 02:36 PM.

  7. #7
    CK1
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    Many years ago, I have stayed in an AI in Spain as it was the only hotel in that little town. Despite the food being delicious and wine was always included, I found out quickly that it's just not for me as a) I'm don't eat much, b) I don't drink alcohol and c) the most important for me: I like being free and independent, meaning, if I'm exploring the area or meeting friends and dining somewhere else, I would just miss too many meals at the AI.

    In a perfect world, my wish would be (if it's doable by the hotels):

    If guests could just book any hotel they would like to stay and include in their booking with they
    a) just want a hotel room
    b) hotel room including breakfast
    c) hotel room including breakfast and lunch
    d) hotel room including dinner
    e) hotel room AI

    I would love to try out the Bucuti and the RIU as well, but only, if a hotel room incl. breakfast were available.

    Just some thoughts........

  8. #8
    Senior Member ~Amy~'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CK1 View Post
    I would love to try out the Bucuti and the RIU as well, but only, if a hotel room incl. breakfast were available.

    Just some thoughts........
    The Bucuti does include breakfast (and a very nice one at that) with their rooms.
    ~Amy~ - 35th trip to Aruba: New Years Eve 2017/2018 -- Zihuatanejo, MX: March 2018 -- Ireland: June/July 2018 -- 36th trip to Aruba: Sept. 2018




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    CK1
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    Quote Originally Posted by ~Amy~ View Post
    The Bucuti does include breakfast (and a very nice one at that) with their rooms.
    Thanks, Amy! That's good to know!

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    CK1
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    Google Translation:

    AHATA resigns en bloc from ATA board

    Posted on 23/06/2016 8:27 am AST | Updated on 06/23/2016 8:28 am AST

    ORANJESTAD - The representatives of the AHATA who sat on the board of the Aruba Tourism Authority (ATA) have Wednesday en bloc withdrew as a board member. Through a letter, where NoticiaCla.com knowledge has been able to have the three AHATA members, namely Joe Najjar (La Cabana), Jim Hepple (AHATA) and Javier Wolter (CMB) ATA informed that they no longer some wish to be part of the board. Specific reasons for the decision were not given, but now it is clear that play different issues that have prompted this abrupt decision. The remaining board members are Simon Arends, Myrna Jansen and Peter Hope, along with the president Jossy Lacle.

    CONFIRMATION PRESIDENT

    Chairman Jossy Lacle only to confirm Wednesday at NoticiaCla.com that he indeed received a letter with the announcement of the resignation. "Yes, I can confirm that I have received the letter," Lacle told NoticiaCla.com. However, he chose to attend to make no further comment. Jim Hepple just wanted to say that he is bound by a confidentiality clause and therefore could not communicate. The other members were not available for comment. ATA Director Ronella Tjin-Asjoe was brief in her response: "I have taken note of the letter and will meet with stakeholders and as always present, always in the interest of our tourism and with all stakeholders"

    REASON FOR RESIGNATION

    NoticiaCla.com has now understood the reasons for the sudden resignation of AHATA members belonging that one is not satisfied with the current policy of the ATA, nor with the lack of respect that shows the Minister of Tourism for the all inclusive- issue and some other issues that are going on within the ATA.

    BOARD COMPOSITION

    The board of the ATA has seven members. Of these, three seat on behalf of the AHATA, three on behalf of the government and together they choose a president. The current chairman is former director of the WEB, Jossy Lacle.

    http://www.noticiacla.com/news/6329
    Last edited by CK1; 06-23-2016 at 07:04 PM.

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