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Thread: Pet Monkeys allowed in Aruba.

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by MaryG View Post
    Well you seemed very nervous about things...
    Concerned is a better word. Doesn't everyone want to check out a neighborhood, if they are considering buying a home there?

    Besides Aruba checked out well and I bought property there. The closing should happen in around 2 months.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jacki View Post
    Calm down guys - I think this thread was meant to be light hearted
    That was my intention...........

  3. #13
    Senior Member Arubalisa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CK1 View Post
    Monkeys will NEVER be housebroken, they will ALWAYS need diapers. I cannot remember the exact numbers but I think a Capuchin monkey can live up to 28 years, the amount in diapers needed was about $70,000.
    LOL, when you have a baby you change diapers for a lot less time AND in your old age you can most likely depend upon that "baby" to change your diapers.
    Seriously though, my dad worked with chimps and what CK said is true.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by vincep View Post
    I didn't realize that having a Monkey as a pet was bad for them? I figured they could be cared for and be happy like Dogs and Cats.

    If they are so hard to housebreak, then why do so many people have the small Monkeys as pets? I'm sure the poor people who have pet Monkeys (in Asia and S. America etc) don't spend the 70k to put diapers on them.

    Perhaps they can be taught to be housebroken and go in a toilet or outside?
    Many times, people get a dog or cat or ~ in this example, a monkey. Many times, people don't really know what they get themselves into to.
    For instance, not every dog breed is suitable for everyone. And at the end, it's always the animals who have to suffer for the mistakes humans make.

    Here is some more info on monkeys. Obviously, there are some monkeys for sale or for adoption.

    The Problem With Pet Monkeys

    Reasons Monkeys Do Not Make Good Pets

    From Lianne McLeod, DVM, former About.com Guide


    The Problem With Pet Monkeys

    Reasons Monkeys Do Not Make Good Pets

    From Lianne McLeod, DVM, former About.com Guide


    There is something irresistible about an infant monkey - they appear so sweet and helpless, and seem so much like a human infant in many ways. However, those sweet babies grow up into difficult adults, and as a general rule adult monkeys do not make good pets. Their intelligence makes them special, but ultimately makes them very challenging pets.


    Note: this article was originally written about keeping monkeys as pets, but the issues are equally as important (possibly more) when it comes to apes (chimpanzees, orangutans, gibbons). Monkeys are a group of animals belonging to the order Primates (which of course, includes apes and humans) -- and the points made here can be applied to all non-human primates.


    Commitment
    Taking on a pet monkey is a long term commitment. A well cared for monkey can live anywhere from 20-40 years, and needs your full commitment throughout their lives. A pet monkey cannot do without your attention when life gets busy or circumstances change.
    Monkeys may not take well to new people in your life (including spouses and children), and make it hard to get away for vacations. Finding a new home for a pet monkey is extremely difficult, and very hard on the monkey which has bonded to its first owner.
    Monkeys are expensive to house and feed, and some require specialized diets that can be time consuming to prepare. A significant commitment of time is needed just for routine care and cleaning up after a pet monkey, but more importantly a monkey needs a large amount of social interaction and attention from the owner. A pet monkey deprived of your time and attention will only develop severe behavior problems and psychological issues.
    Legal Issues
    Primates including monkeys may be illegal to keep as pets in some areas. Many states prohibit keeping primates as pets. If legal, permits may be required, and sometimes permit holders are subject to inspection for proper facilities and care.
    Medical Issues
    A wide range of diseases can be passed from monkeys and other primates to humans. See "Zoonoses Acquired from Pet Primates" by David M. Renquist, D.V.M., M.A. and Robert A. Whitney, Jr., D.V.M., M.S. for a thorough discussion of this aspect. Finding a vet who is able and willing to treat a primate may also be difficult. Monkeys and apes are also susceptible to a variety of illnesses of humans, which can be devastating for the monkey.
    Aggression
    The sweet dependent baby monkey will eventually grow up, and become the wild animal it was meant to be. Unfortunately, raising a monkey around humans doesn't change the wild nature of monkey, and in fact depriving a pet monkey of normal social relationships with other monkeys can create behavior problems and neuroses.
    Pet monkeys also have a tendency to bite. They have different personalities so one cannot generalize, but some monkeys will be very aggressive, and others will be more docile. Nevertheless, monkeys are unpredictable and may turn aggressively on anyone, including the person to whom they are the closest.
    The Mess
    Monkeys are messy. They can't really be effectively toilet trained (many younger monkeys can be diapered or at least partly toilet trained, but that is often lost at maturity) and sometimes engage in distasteful activities involving their feces and urine.
    Aside from the toileting messes, pet monkeys can be extremely mischievous and destructive, especially if bored.
    Housing
    Monkeys need a large secure enclosure and should spend time outdoors too if possible. They must be provided with a wide variety of ever changing toys and exercise equipment to keep them challenged and stimulated, or they will suffer from boredom.
    More
    There are many more aspects to cover in the consideration of monkeys as pets. For more detailed discussions of the reality of pet monkeys, visit the following web pages:


    Suggested Reading



    Related Articles






    http://exoticpets.about.com/cs/prima...atesaspets.htm

  5. #15
    Senior Member cpjones's Avatar
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    LOL.... this thread!

  6. #16
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    IMO, it deserves some consideration.

    How many times are people tempted to get an exotic pet? And when they don't want it anymore or can not handle it anymore, they "get rid of it".

    In some cases, like Boas or Lionfish, it can have catastrophic effects on the environment.

    I wished there would be much tougher laws. Everywhere. To protect the animals, the environments and sometimes people who will be in over their heads.

  7. #17
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    I just came across this info, I did not know that there was a sanctuary for exotic animals in Noord, it's the only one on Aruba. There are several pictures on the link. The last one is a monkey.

    Aruba: Habitat for Rescued Animals Excursion

    http://www.getyourguide.com/noord-l1...nimals-t26063/

  8. #18
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    Well, I had an exotic pet in Aruba who took up residency on my property by inviting himself to stay. A huge Boa constrictor. Trouble is it lived in the tree above my garbage bins and on one occassion curled down the branches to greet the garbage guys from Serlimar during a pickup. Needless to say my garbage stayed put for that visit and now the bins are locted elsewhere on my property and my garbage pickup is back to normal. Seems to me a tree full of snakes is a good deterent to anyone considering a breakin. (lol)

    My gardener and the garbage guys told me it is the largest they had seen on the island. Lucky me.
    Last edited by aquaman; 09-10-2013 at 05:16 PM.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by CK1 View Post
    IMO, it deserves some consideration.

    How many times are people tempted to get an exotic pet? And when they don't want it anymore or can not handle it anymore, they "get rid of it".

    In some cases, like Boas or Lionfish, it can have catastrophic effects on the environment.

    I wished there would be much tougher laws. Everywhere. To protect the animals, the environments and sometimes people who will be in over their heads.
    I would never want a pet I couldn't take care of. I have two dogs and I take excellent care of them. My almost 11 year old Shih Tzu got very sick a few months ago and almost died. I took her to a animal hospital, she stayed 4 days and cost me $5,000 for the week. She is doing much better now but still requires meds and vet visits. Next month she turns 11 and hopefully can live a few more years.

    Some people thought I was crazy spending that kind of money on a "dog" but I couldn't live with myself if I didn't try to save her. I even delayed my planned most recent Aruba Trip by over a month on account of her getting sick. Thank God she is doing well now.

    The idea of a pet monkey seems interesting but not if the animal will suffer and not have good quality of life. I am an animal lover.
    Last edited by vincep; 09-10-2013 at 08:57 PM.

  10. #20
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    I love this forum!
    Sean and Susan

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