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Thread: Alcohol

  1. #1
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    Alcohol

    Are the rules still 2 bottles per person? Also, do you have any specific places to get high end liquor?

  2. #2
    Aruba since 1979
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    Andrea J.'s Avatar
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    are you asking about bringing in duty free?
    if so....

    Customs Rules
    Import regulations::
    Free import by non-residents older than 15 years (residents may import half the duty free quantities). If more is imported the whole quantity is dutiable:
    1. 200 cigarettes or 50 cigars;
    2. 1 litre of distilled beverages or 2.25 litres of wine or 3 litres beer;
    3. gift articles up to a value of AWG 100.-.
    Quote Originally Posted by schmidtm1965 View Post
    Are the rules still 2 bottles per person?

    if you are not talking about duty free.
    liquor, top shelf or otherwise can be bought at aruba grocery stores.
    (Lings has a good selection)
    some of the mini marts at the resorts have liquor to purchase.
    Also, do you have any specific places to get high end liquor?

  3. #3
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    if you are not talking about duty free.
    liquor, top shelf or otherwise can be bought at aruba grocery stores.
    (Lings has a good selection)
    some of the mini marts at the resorts have liquor to purchase.
    Also, do you have any specific places to get high end liquor?[/QUOTE]

  4. #4
    Senior Member corona's Avatar
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    We bought a bottle of mango flavored rum (I forget the brand) at the duty free shop just past the luggage pickup but before going though customs at the Aruban airport. We found the same bottle of rum at two different shops in Aruba. One store had it marked at $49 and another $34. We paid $11 for it in duty free. It's definitely wasn't top shelf by any stretch, but I'd check duty free before leaving the airport for sure. They had high end liquor at the duty free as well, but I don't have prices for it (Maker's Mark, Johnnie Walker Blue Label, etc). The shop isn't nearly as big as the duty free shops in the bigger airports, so the selection is smaller, but if you're not looking for something too selective, there's a good chance you'll find it.
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  5. #5
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    Sorry if I was confusing. I'm asking how much I can bring home? I usually will bring back a couple bottles of top shelf for my personal bar.

  6. #6
    Senior Member corona's Avatar
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    Sorry for the misunderstanding. There's a pretty nice sized duty free shop at the Aruba airport just after you go through the first security check. They definitely have many top shelf brands. Was there a special brand you were looking for? I may remember if I saw it. They packaged our bottle in bubble wrap and sent it to where you pick up your checked bag for the custom's check so that you can put it into your bag. We only bought one bottle, so there was no question we were within the allowable limit. There's also a small duty free shop at the gate, but you'd have to carry on anything you bought. If you have a layover that could pose a problem if for some reason you had to go out of security and re-enter.

    Here's what I found regarding the amount you can bring:



    Alcoholic BeveragesOne liter (33.8 fl. oz.) of alcoholic beverages may be included in your exemption if:
    • You are 21 years old.
    • It is for your own use or as a gift.
    • It does not violate the laws of the state in which you arrive.

    Federal regulations allow you to bring back more than one liter of alcoholic beverage for personal use, but, as with extra tobacco, you will have to pay duty and Internal Revenue Service tax.

    While federal regulations do not specify a limit on the amount of alcohol you may bring back for personal use, unusual quantities are liable to raise suspicions that you are importing the alcohol for other purposes, such as for resale. CBP officers are authorized by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) to make on-the-spot determinations that an importation is for commercial purposes, and may require you to obtain a permit to import the alcohol before releasing it to you. If you intend to bring back a substantial quantity of alcohol for your personal use, you should contact the port through which you will be re-entering the country, and make prior arrangements for entering the alcohol into the United States.

    Also, you should be aware that state laws might limit the amount of alcohol you can bring in without a license. If you arrive in a state that has limitations on the amount of alcohol you may bring in without a license, that state law will be enforced by CBP, even though it may be more restrictive than federal regulations. We recommend that you check with the state government before you go abroad about their limitations on quantities allowed for personal importation and additional state taxes that might apply.
    In brief, for both alcohol and tobacco, the quantities discussed in this booklet as being eligible for duty-free treatment may be included in your $800 or $1,600 exemption, just as any other purchase would be. But unlike other kinds of merchandise, amounts beyond those discussed here as being duty-free are taxed, even if you have not exceeded, or even met, your personal exemption. For example, if your exemption is $800 and you bring back three liters of wine and nothing else, two of those liters will be dutiable. Federal law prohibits shipping alcoholic beverages by mail within the United States.

    http://www.cbp.gov/xp/cgov/travel/va...aying_duty.xml
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  7. #7
    Senior Member Chadd's Avatar
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    Actually Aruba falls under the Caribbean Basin regulations. You can bring back two liters per person duty free as long as at least one was produced in a CB nation. If anyone isn't planning to use their full allotment, I will provide my address and you can send some palmera to me.

    http://www.cbp.gov/linkhandler/cgov/...egulations.pdf

  8. #8
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    thanks chadd

    Quote Originally Posted by Chadd View Post
    Actually Aruba falls under the Caribbean Basin regulations. You can bring back two liters per person duty free as long as at least one was produced in a CB nation. If anyone isn't planning to use their full allotment, I will provide my address and you can send some palmera to me.

    http://www.cbp.gov/linkhandler/cgov/...egulations.pdf

  9. #9
    Senior Member corona's Avatar
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    Another way to save for the next trip Aruba. Thanks for info Chadd.
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