Aruba Beach
Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 47
Like Tree15Likes

Thread: A post from a new member...re: denied air due to parental permission

  1. #1
    Aruba since 1979
    Moderator
    Andrea J.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    29,945

    A post from a new member...re: denied air due to parental permission

    I would like to post a question for travelers.
    2014 would have been our 9th consecutive trip to Aruba --- 5th year traveling with my daughter and her daughter (our granddaughter). The father has never joined us.
    We had a brand new passport for the 6 year old since her first 5 years was used up. Her father had to be present to get the passport in January 2014.
    When we arrived at the ticket counter in March2014 --we were not allowed to board because we did not have a signed permission form from the father. We never had this form for any of the other trips.
    I would like to know if anyone else has been denied boarding because of the same occurrence.

    There is nothing on the website and the airlines refunded our tickets -- but we lost our timeshare for 2014. We feel like we were unfairly treated.

    Where and how do I submit this ? Thank you

  2. #2
    Aruba since 1979
    Moderator
    Andrea J.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    29,945
    I am hopeful that this member of our community responds here.

    Here is what I wrote to her, and I hope that other forum members have some comments as well.


    Hi


    My name is Andrea James and I am the WWW. Aruba.com/forum moderator.


    What a nightmare...I am so sorry.


    I posted your "story" in the airline/airfare category.


    I am sort of speechless.


    Here is an example of what we had to do in the past. 1997 thru 2004


    Our son now aged 29 always traveled with us to Aruba. Because he is an only child, we always brought a friend, ***. His parents were separated at a couple of points in time.


    I spoke with our attorney and with the airlines re: their regulations and our legal responsibilities with us bringing the child.
    I was told that I would need separate letters of permission from each parent, whether they were together or apart, giving permission for *** to be in our care, for him to travel out of the country on specific dates.
    We also needed to have a document re: medical care.
    We also needed to have him have his own trip insurance policy.
    We also had his parents add him as a signer on their VISA card....in the event he needed medical care, cash and credit card are the only things that work at the hospital for tourists in Aruba.




    Everything had to be notarized (signatures)


    In this day and age and I guess dating back to 1997 it is imperative that we all do it right.


    1. That being said........your timeshare would not cut you any slack and let you reschedule?


    2. Is your main question about the denied boarding or of the timeshare being lost for 2014?


    3. Did you have trip interruption/cancellation insurance? I am not sure if it would have included timeshare reimbursement.


    I am posting my letter on the thread that I created on your behalf in the Airline/Airfare category.




    (an after thought.....if there is a divorce decree and custody papers, those would be required to be shown to the airline as well. we all read of and see on tv stories of parental kidnapping. this is a prime example of prevention. )





    Last edited by Andrea J.; 06-06-2014 at 12:28 PM.

  3. #3
    Senior Member ArubaAce's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Arashi Beach, Malmok Beach, Eagle Beach.
    Posts
    1,310
    That is horrible especially since they had traveled before without any form of documentation.

    A few years ago, I took my niece to Puerto Rico. I wasn't sure if I needed permission so I contacted Jet Blue and they informed me that as long as she was 14 it would be ok but under that age she would need written permission. She was 13 at the time but on the trip date she would be 14 so we were ok. Still I was nervous that something would change or happen so I called again asking for reassurances. Everything worked out.

    I think they should have something in their system that when you book a ticket for a minor, they ask what is your relationship to child and then alert of any documentations needed. I know on most airline website it ask for age of each ticketed passenger.

  4. #4
    Aruba since 1979
    Moderator
    Andrea J.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    29,945
    the airlines are very murky re: traveling with minors internationally.
    from what i have been told, puerto rico is not considered international.

    it is all about "kidnapping"
    what has become of the world in which we live?

    From SWA (air tran) website.
    It is pretty clear.
    International Travel





    All passengers (including U.S. citizens and children, regardless of age) must have a valid passport book in order to travel to and from the United States. Passport cards are not an approved form of identification and will not be accepted. Learn more about document requirements for international air travelers at travel.state.gov, cbp.gov or dhs.gov.
    Minors under the age of 18 are not permitted to fly unaccompanied on international flights or any itinerary that includes an international flight. If a minor is traveling with an adult over the age of 18, they must be listed on the same flight itinerary.
    Government taxes and fees may apply to children under 2 for international travel.
    Additional policies for children traveling on international flights:

    • Children, regardless of age, must have a valid passport book in order to travel.
    • Depending on the Customer’s circumstances and travel itinerary, additional travel document requirements may be imposed by the originating and/or destination country.
    • Many governments have initiated procedures at entry and exit points, which may include requiring documentary evidence of relationship and permission for the child’s travel from the non-traveling parent(s) and/or legal guardian(s).
    • In the case of a child traveling without both legal parents or guardians, Customers must follow the guidelines provided by the country of destination.

    For more information on specific requirements by country, click the country below:

    • Aruba
      • Visitors to Aruba may be asked to show onward/return tickets, proof of sufficient funds, and proof of lodging accommodations for their stay.

    • Bahamas
    • Dominican Republic
    • Mexico
    • Jamaica

    Non-Resident Visitors to the U.S.


    Last edited by Andrea J.; 06-06-2014 at 12:29 PM.

  5. #5
    Aruba since 1979
    Moderator
    Andrea J.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    29,945
    I could not find the policy on Jet Blue and called customer service.
    Marlene from JB cuts service pretty much repeated the exact thing that was on SWA's site.

  6. #6
    Aruba since 1979
    Moderator
    Andrea J.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    29,945
    from AA site
    Consent For Minor Traveling Without Both Parents/Guardians

    Minors under the age of 18 who are traveling with only one parent may be required to have additional documentation if leaving their country of residence. Please contact the nearest Consulate of the country to which you are traveling for additional information.

  7. #7
    Senior Member gretch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Eagle Beach
    Posts
    328
    Hi, I have 2 children ages 9 and 14. The only places we travel to are Aruba and Florida and always on Jetblue. I like to vacation for 2 weeks but my husband can’t take that long off from work so he meets us wherever we are going 5 or 6 days later which means I travel alone with the kids. I have NEVER been denied boarding. I’ve actually never been questioned or anything similar. If I had to guess I’ve flown alone with my girls at least 10 times.

    As a matter of fact, my husband adopted my oldest daughter but before he did she had a different last name than both of us. I had her biological father sign a notarized letter giving us permission just in case but the airline never asked for it. This was in 2002 on AA before Jetblue had non-stop to Aruba (or may AA was cheaper, I forget).

    It probably depends on who you get at the airline and whether or not they are a stickler. Although, now I’m paranoid and will have a letter from my husband in August!!

  8. #8
    Senior Member ~Amy~'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    2,691
    Quote Originally Posted by gretch View Post
    It probably depends on who you get at the airline and whether or not they are a stickler. Although, now I’m paranoid and will have a letter from my husband in August!!
    This is generally true as far as who you get at the airline. Some follow the rules to the "T" and others do not and are more lax.

    These rules though regarding traveling without the other parent present and needing a notarized letter of permission have been in effect for many, many years due to divorces and parents trying to take their child out of the country if they did not get custody, etc. I used to work for an airline doing inflight audit. If for some reason the airline was caught not following the rules they could be fined thousands of dollars so it's in their best interest to comply.
    ~Amy~ - 35th trip to Aruba: New Years Eve 2017/2018 -- Zihuatanejo, MX: March 2018 -- Ireland: June/July 2018 -- 36th trip to Aruba: Sept. 2018




  9. #9
    Senior Member cpjones's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Eagle Beach, Glitz Casino, Manchebo Beach Resort
    Posts
    3,898
    Quote Originally Posted by ~Amy~ View Post
    This is generally true as far as who you get at the airline. Some follow the rules to the "T" and others do not and are more lax.

    These rules though regarding traveling without the other parent present and needing a notarized letter of permission have been in effect for many, many years due to divorces and parents trying to take their child out of the country if they did not get custody, etc. I used to work for an airline doing inflight audit. If for some reason the airline was caught not following the rules they could be fined thousands of dollars so it's in their best interest to comply.
    Valid points..... but let folks know the requirements when booking in a way that people will actually pay attention to. Having to list birthdates should be a trigger for the airlines and travel agents to notify people. Just sayin'.....

  10. #10
    CK1
    CK1 is offline
    Senior Member CK1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Anywhere where I can see the turquoise-blue ocean
    Posts
    2,285
    Here is an official website:
    U.S. Customs and Border Protection

    Children - Child traveling with one parent or someone who is not a parent or legal guardian or a group

    If a child (under the age of 18) is traveling with only one parent or someone who is not a parent or legal guardian, what paperwork should the adult have to indicate permission or legal authority to have that child in their care?

    Due to the increasing incidents of child abductions in disputed custody cases and as possible victims of child pornography, Customs and Border Protection (CBP) strongly recommends that unless the child is accompanied by both parents, the adult have a note from the child's other parent (or, in the case of a child traveling with grandparents, uncles or aunts, sisters or brothers, friends, or in groups*, a note signed by both parents) stating "I acknowledge that my wife/husband/etc. is traveling out of the country with my son/daughter/group. He/She/They has/have my permission to do so." See our Q&A parental consent.
    * School groups, teen tours, vacation groups.
    CBP also suggests that this note be notarized.
    While CBP may not ask to see this documentation, if we do ask, and you do not have it, you may be detained until the circumstances of the child traveling without both parents can be fully assessed. If there is no second parent with legal claims to the child (deceased, sole custody, etc.) any other relevant paperwork, such as a court decision, birth certificate naming only one parent, death certificate, etc., would be useful.

    Adults traveling with children should also be aware that, while the U.S. does not require this documentation, many other countries do; failure to produce notarized permission letters and/or birth certificates could result in travelers being refused entry (Canada has very strict requirements in this regard).
    If you wish to receive automatic updates to this Q&A, select "Subscribe to Updates" on the left side of this screen.

    Here is some other information you may find helpful:






    https://help.cbp.gov/app/answers/det...ot-a-parent-or

Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO