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Thread: A post from a new member...re: denied air due to parental permission

  1. #31
    Super Moderator Jacki's Avatar
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    Great information everyone. Thanks for all the input. I'm sure many of these things would come to mind when you are travelling with someone else's child. Considering that the child's mother was travelling, I can't imagine I would think of getting a document from the parent not travelling. Thanks jomar for bringing it up
    Jacki ~ loving Aruba from NJ

  2. #32
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    Amy and CK1 nailed it. There are procedures in place to protect traveling children. The airlines are subject to huge fines if they are found at fault for allowing unauthorized persons traveling. They are actually the best point of contact for determining what is required for travel. ALWAYS contact the scheduled airline if you have questions about air travel. For instance flying with a checked firearm. Some require a specific type of lock box. Traveling with pets. Each airline have their own specific rules that enhance the basic requirements. And in these times of merging airlines it is very important to double check because some of the rules that US Airways had may not be the same rules as American Airlines/United & Continental.

  3. #33
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    Ironically --- I spoke with customer service three times prior to the flight. Once to get the assigned seat for us, another to add her FF # AND last to update her passport number( done the week prior to the flight). I asked if all was OK and if everything looked OK. answer was" YES - everything looks good". Since we had done this trip 5 prior years --- I did not know about the letter plus her mom was with her. On the website for AirTran when you look at what is required to travel into Aruba --- it does not mention this letter. I have contacted several agencies and no where does it have a ruling in writing that to enter Aruba -- this must be furnished. Thanks for your input and yes there are many rules concerning pets, firearms, etc ----- but for a daughter / granddaughter? Thanks again


    Quote Originally Posted by tnt-k9 View Post
    Amy and CK1 nailed it. There are procedures in place to protect traveling children. The airlines are subject to huge fines if they are found at fault for allowing unauthorized persons traveling. They are actually the best point of contact for determining what is required for travel. ALWAYS contact the scheduled airline if you have questions about air travel. For instance flying with a checked firearm. Some require a specific type of lock box. Traveling with pets. Each airline have their own specific rules that enhance the basic requirements. And in these times of merging airlines it is very important to double check because some of the rules that US Airways had may not be the same rules as American Airlines/United & Continental.

  4. #34
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    Littlejen22:
    I did research and even now -- 4 months later -- I am still baffled. I have asked on this posting if anyone else has experienced this problem and not one has replied yes out of 2400 visitors.
    Aruba is the destination country and the airlines page does not state it even now. Copied from SW iNTERNATIONAL requirements:"In the case of a child traveling without both legal parents or guardians, Customers must follow the guidelines provided by the country of destination.

    1. Aruba



    • Visitors to Aruba may be asked to show onward/return tickets, proof of sufficient funds, and proof of lodging accommodations for their stay.



    Many have posted with comments on traveling with friends children. This was not our case. Her mother was with us. A new passport was issued two months prior which now requires both parents to be present. But even after contacting Aruba -- I still have found nothing stating this letter is required.
    I also own at the Surf Club and love Aruba -- but I am fearful of something similar happening again with a different "rule'. With all the planning we did and all the calls: to get seats, add the updated passport number and getting her a FF # ---- I fear the ticket counter agent ruling "you can not board".
    Thank you for your comment.

    QUOTE=littlejen22;257886]While It might be infuriating that the airline did not allow them onto the plane, if Aruba's rules state they must have the documentation it would be horribly irresponsible for the airline to allow them on the plane. Did they research the rules of the US and Aruba before going to the airport? Honestly I know I would be pissed if I were them but as far as the airline knew the mother did not have permission to take the child. Out of the country, honestly I think the airlines should check for this in every situation.[/QUOTE]

  5. #35
    Senior Member gretch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gretch View Post
    Hi, I have 2 children ages 9 and 14. The only places we travel to are Aruba and Florida and always on Jetblue. I like to vacation for 2 weeks but my husband can’t take that long off from work so he meets us wherever we are going 5 or 6 days later which means I travel alone with the kids. I have NEVER been denied boarding. I’ve actually never been questioned or anything similar. If I had to guess I’ve flown alone with my girls at least 10 times.

    As a matter of fact, my husband adopted my oldest daughter but before he did she had a different last name than both of us. I had her biological father sign a notarized letter giving us permission just in case but the airline never asked for it. This was in 2002 on AA before Jetblue had non-stop to Aruba (or may AA was cheaper, I forget).

    It probably depends on who you get at the airline and whether or not they are a stickler. Although, now I’m paranoid and will have a letter from my husband in August!!
    As promised....we just returned from Aruba. We traveled JetBlue and I was not asked for any sort of permission from my husband from the airline. The only thing I needed to prove was that I was in fact returning to the United States as I bought each ticket as a one way ticket. I was never questioned about taking the kids out of the country.

  6. #36
    Super Moderator Jacki's Avatar
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    Thanks for following up Gretch
    Jacki ~ loving Aruba from NJ

  7. #37
    Aruba since 1979
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    Great that Gretch and family had an easy time!

    IMO the aruba government and airlines should set the rule, and it be a rule all airlines and aruba can follow.
    It needs to be consistently followed.

  8. #38
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    This happened to us!

    Our kids are "adults" now but we have had numerous occassions when we were asked for parental letters. The first time was actually when my kids were very young and we were meeting DH in Orlando from Canada. I had a letter from DH stating that I was traveling with his permission and meeting up with him. At customs they did ask me for the letter and took children's birth certificates (those days no passport was required) and agent starting asking kids questions. Oldest son was 8 years old and he asked him his bday, he just called out 6 and 4 year olds names to see if they would respond to their name.

    Over the years we traveled to Aruba, youngest son is now 20, we have had several occassions when we were asked for parental letters. Most of the times it was at our point of departure (Canada) and some when we were at US Customs, just depended on what airline we flew to Aruba on. We traveled with other children besides our own and always carried two letters, one for allowing us to take the minor child with us and the other giving us permission to assume medical care if needed.

    Many times our kids met us in Aruba and traveled either alone or together (one was 16 and the other was 18) and the 16 year old carried a travel letter stating he was traveling with his brother and had parents permission. Sometimes they were asked for it and sometimes they weren't. A good friend of ours is a family lawyer (whom always did our parental letter) and he said that in today's society this is becoming a norm. He always recommends traveling with parental letter. When I traveled with one of my kids without DH, the letter stated that there was no marital separation, I had permission to travel with children and DH would be meeting up with us at a later date, etc. It had travel details on the document and it was signed by DH. When kids traveled alone, similar letter but signed by both parents. Letters were notorarized too. With the ease of travel and the ability to take children out of a country quickly, customs agents are more attuned to this. So we should look at the request for parental letters as a GOOD THING as they are protecting our children.

    So to the original poster, yes you need to carry a parental letter even if you are grandparents. One other thing, sometimes it wasn't a customs agent that asked for the letter it was the airline representative at check in.
    happiness is going to Aruba with your adult kids because they still want to come with their parents

  9. #39
    Senior Member danadog56's Avatar
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    wow, my 14 year old niece has been bugging me for years to bring her to aruba and every year I put her off to "next year"....her mom finally agreed this year but as of this date has never gone to get her passport, i guess I am glad because I seriously doubt she would sign any kind of papers for my benefit (just a little crazy my niece)
    Guess she will have to wait to 18...
    ARUBA....HOME AWAY FROM HOME

  10. #40
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    Thank you Gretch ----- I agree that it is an airlines requirement and I appreciate the follow up. It should be standardized across all airlines.
    Many have given their opinions but not their experience. I posted to get responses to actual experiences and to alert anyone what may happen so that no one else packs their bags and gets no further than the ticket counter. THANK YOU for sharing.

    Quote Originally Posted by gretch View Post
    As promised....we just returned from Aruba. We traveled JetBlue and I was not asked for any sort of permission from my husband from the airline. The only thing I needed to prove was that I was in fact returning to the United States as I bought each ticket as a one way ticket. I was never questioned about taking the kids out of the country.

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