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Thread: Home swaps: a good idea?

  1. #11
    Junior Member fromspain's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Excellent!

    Carsten, wow!! This is just the sort of "summing up" I was looking for. Thanks a million for your comments and advices! I appreciate it very much.

    It's very late over here so I'll be brief and continue tomorrow:
    -Healthcare: That is such a relief! I do not expect the same level as in here but I feared for a worst scenario and it's good to know it's not like that.
    -Education: My baby is not even 4 years old yet but I prefer education in English. I have nothing against Dutch but I will not be able to help him with homeworks and that would kill me. The question is: how expensive is private school?
    -Safety: yes, I know Aruba is quite safe and I must say I feel very safe in the city I live too.

    As for prices, that's the only thing I do not agree with. Spain seems to me less expensive than Aruba, in many aspects. I have been in Aruba and in general food, breverages, apartment rent, real estate prices, electricity,etc , they all are more expensive than over here. I was rather shocked by the community costs per month, my God, they're skyrocketed.


    I am glad to see a Scandinavian enjoying himself in Aruba and participating in this forum. It was a pleasant surprise to read your post!
    Last edited by fromspain; 02-28-2011 at 10:05 PM.

  2. #12
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    Glad if you can use my comments .

    Regarding the cost, I guess it depends on where you are in Spain as well.
    It has been a while since I lived there, so your perception is probably more correct than mine. I compare it to i.e. Barcelona or Marbella.
    In Aruba there is also a big difference where you do your shopping etc. etc..
    Since almost everything is imported it is pretty expensive here. But local fish is cheap (if you know where to buy it) and you are almost stupid if you spend any money on bottled water here.
    A lot of other living expenses also go way down, when you live here and learn the ropes of Aruba living. I.e. a lobster is $80 in the shops per kg., but $20 or less on the right beach .
    Be very careful where you buy as some places almost seems like a big scam when it comes to community costs while others are extremely cheap.

    The private school is around $13-17.000 per kid per year (cheaper the younger they are). So maybe you better start learning Dutch .


    Carsten

  3. #13
    CK1
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    Great posts!

    I heard the most difficult part is to actually get a working permit. As for all job offers, Aruban residents are preferred (by government requirement). And it can be time-consuming (years?) to get a working permit.

    Here is some online info:

    Temporary or Permanent Work Permit
    Any foreigner who wants to exercise a profession/occupation must have a work permit to do so. The work permit will normally be granted only if there are no qualified persons locally available. In general, requests for work permits will only be taken into consideration if submitted through a local employer, who has to accept full responsibility for any possible expenses to be incurred by the government relative to its employees. For a trainee position or internship a special work permit is required.
    With the exception of tourists, all other foreigners should have a permit document to prove their legal presence on the island. This means that one (unless a tourist) should not travel to or be on the island pending a request for a residence and/or work permit.
    To obtain more information and application forms contact


    Department of Public Order and Security
    Caya Dick Cooper 11
    San Nicolas, Aruba
    Phone: (297) 584-3322
    Fax: (297) 584-3258/584-3534

    More info at link:

    http://www.arubachamber.com/relocation.htm

  4. #14
    Junior Member fromspain's Avatar
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    Smile I agree, great posts

    Schnauzerjoy, you got it right. Prices vary greatly from city to city and even depending on what you buy. Generally as you go south things get cheaper, Marbella is an exception to that but well, it aims at the rich and extravagant.
    Barcelona (north Spain) is a great city, where you can find anything you can imagine, but it is expensive. Madrid (center) is also expensive.
    Alicante (south by the Mediterranean sea) is not expensive and the weather is nice. I have also lived in the Canary islands, mildly hot all year round and prices are cheaper eventhough most things are imported from the mainland.
    And there is a universal rule, you must obviously know where to buy. I guess that it happens in any country that if you walk around acting like a typical tourist you will be charged as such Spain is no exception to that.
    And I must say taxi drivers have a special detector for tourists , specially those that arrive for the 1st time...or is it just that they kindly want to give newcomers a city tour?

    CK1, I suppose that applies for those who seek for a job there, hard task anywhere. What about those who already have a job and can carry it along wherever they go? Do they get strict in those cases too?

    PS: is Dutch very difficult?
    Last edited by fromspain; 03-01-2011 at 12:27 PM.

  5. #15
    Senior Member Arubalisa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fromspain View Post
    CK1, I suppose that applies for those who seek for a job there, hard task anywhere. What about those who already have a job and can carry it along wherever they go? Do they get strict in those cases too?

    PS: is Dutch very difficult?

    http://www.arubachamber.com/relocation.htm

  6. #16
    CK1
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    Quote Originally Posted by fromspain View Post
    CK1, I suppose that applies for those who seek for a job there, hard task anywhere. What about those who already have a job and can carry it along wherever they go? Do they get strict in those cases too?

    PS: is Dutch very difficult?
    FromSpain, here is an excerpt from the link I posted last night, Arubalisa posted the link again as well.

    In general, it boils down to:
    - do you have enough money to take care for yourself and your family
    - will you not take a job away from an Aruban resident.

    You probably have to prove that you make enough money from your clients abroad (outside Aruba). However, there will also be lots of job opportunities on Aruba when you move there. With only a Permanent Residence Permit, you are not allow to take that opportunity. It would be great if you could convince the Aruban authorities to get both, a Working Permit and Residence Permit. I think you have a good shot. If you plan on going to Aruba, it might be good to apply in person, bringing the required documentation along. JMO.


    Permanent Residence Permit
    When requesting a residence permit without a working permit, one must submit:

    1 bank references indicating that the applicant is financially self-supporting or any other proof that he will not become a financial burden to the local government or community;
    2 the home and business addresses for the last ten years;
    3
    the reasons for wanting to reside in Aruba, and
    4
    a certificate of police clearance (“good conduct” document), not older than 2 months.

    Persons desiring a permanent residence permit must be in possession of:

    1 a passport valid for Aruba;
    2
    three passport photographs of true likeness;
    3
    a valid vaccination certificate for smallpox, not more than three years old;
    4 a medical certificate that the holder is not suffering from any contagious disease or mental illness, issued within 30 days before the trip started, and
    5
    a proof of payment of the required legal fee.
    http://www.arubachamber.com/relocation.htm

  7. #17
    CK1
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    Quote Originally Posted by fromspain View Post
    PS: is Dutch very difficult?
    IMO: Yes.

    I speak German and understand only bits and pieces when hearing/reading Dutch.

    Here is an online newspaper in Dutch:

    http://amigoenieuws.com/

    Dutch is the official language in Aruba. But Papiamento is spoken by many Aruban people:

    http://www.bondia.com/index.php?opti...d=15&Itemid=26

    Many times, people mix the languages. They speak English with a tourist, then they turn to their coworker and talk to them in Papiamento, the next moment they talk to someone else in speak Dutch, they they turn around and speak English with the tourist again.

  8. #18
    CK1
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    And here is a link to the "International School of Aruba":

    http://www.isaruba.com/

    As there are no universities on Aruba, many parents send their kids after graduation (17 or 18 years old) to the Netherlands to continue with their education.

  9. #19
    Junior Member fromspain's Avatar
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    Smile thanks

    Thanks everyone for your responses.
    Arubalisa, nice to have you here.

    Ck1, thanks for all your posts.
    Regarding the goverment restrictions, they're tough but not sth to be worried about.
    I work online, I will continue having customers outside Aruba no matter where I am, and my business certainly does not take the job away from an Aruban resident or any other resident in this planet, my business is "mine" and so are my dear customers
    I'm not rich but I do have enough money saved so as not to show up empty-handed over there plus I have good reference from many Spanish banks, including ING

    Curiously enough now my only concern is my sons's education and me finding 17 000 usd per year extremely expensive . If somebody robs a bank in Aruba, police should start looking for someone whose son studies at ISA That'll be a good clue.

    Now, seriously, is that the only school in Aruba that teaches in English and/or Spanish? As for the university, I wouldn't mind sending my baby to study in Spain, when the time arrives. Yet, it is strange most people send their children to The Netherlands as you say and not to the USA that is so near. is it because of the language? is it because Universities in the Netherlands are more prestigious than USA? is it tradition?
    I'm just guessing here, I'd like to know.
    I must admit I like the "Native Spanish Language Program " they have at ISA.

    As the poet Quevedo would say " Poderoso caballero es Don Dinero"
    Last edited by fromspain; 03-01-2011 at 05:06 PM.

  10. #20
    CK1
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    You are very welcome, FromSpain. I find it very exciting that you consider moving to Aruba!

    Just a quick note as I'm in a hurry:

    You can contact ISA and find out their exact rates. I know it's a very nice, modern school. I believe there are more international schools.

    The reason why many parents send their kids to the Netherlands: Aruba and the Netherlands have strong ties and support the education of Arubans, there are certain programs, housing etc.

    Some go to the USA which is expensive unless they have a scholarship.

    Education in many European countries is free. Not so in the USA.

    Gotta go! Later!

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