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Thread: Home swaps: a good idea?

  1. #21
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    Have to put a few comment in again:

    There are Universities in Aruba, although very small and specialized.

    I am very interested to hear what other International schools are in Aruba .

    Dutch is not harder or easier to learn that other languages. It all depends of your capacity in general to learn a new language and your age. If you are old (over 40) any new language is pretty hard to learn for most people.
    I have friends that expect to move here in 3 years, who have studied Dutch 2 hours a week only this winter and they are already at simple conversation level.
    I can tell you that if you speak German, Danish and English and have a good language ear, you are able to read Dutch to a level where you get the point, hear and understand Dutch spoken to a point where you can guess it and speaking it is out of the question .

    Even if you are self employed, you still need a work permit in Aruba. Nobody might care if you don't do any business at all in Aruba (all clients abroad) but you still need it formally.

    I (and everyone else I know who know the system here) would strongly suggest getting a local representation if you are going to get a work permit, especially when you have special circumstances like you do. This is a very special process.

    Since you work online, I can assure you that broadband here is very good for being an Island. Just got mine upgraded, so my house have 10 down and 1 up (just measured it right now to 8/0.95).

    Carsten

  2. #22
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    Interesting comments, Carsten. If you are old (over 40)...

    I stand correct on the universities, however, many students go abroad to study because of the limited opportunities.

    When I was on Aruba during my vacations, I liked very much talking to people and hearing their stories. Some were Americans who live now on Aruba, got married, got kids. They also mentioned the schools their kids went to (sorry, cannot remember the school's name) but it was not the International School of Aruba, however, their kids still learned English, Dutch, Papiamento, some even more languages. I believe, one could be the Colegio Arubana. That's when I thought there were more international schools. But I don't know the specifics. Maybe I'm wrong.

    I looked up some schools, will post the links. Maybe you can point FromSpain in the right direction.

  3. #23
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  4. #24
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  5. #25
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    Facts about Aruba

    Excerpt about "Education":

    Aruba's educational system, patterned after the Dutch system, provides for education at all levels. The Government finances the national education system, except for private schools, such as the International School of Aruba (ISA), which finance their own activities. The percentage of money earmarked for education is higher than the average for the Caribbean/Latin American region.
    Arubans benefit from a strong primary school education. A segmented secondary school program includes vocational training (VMBO), basic education (MAVO), college prep (HAVO) and advanced placement (VWO).
    Higher education goals can be pursued through the Professional Education program (EPI), the teachers college (IPA) as well as through the University of Aruba (UA) which offers bachelors and masters programs in law, finance and economics and hospitality and tourism management. Since the choice for higher education on the island itself is limited, many students choose study in the Netherlands, or abroad in countries in North America, South America as well as the rest of Europe.
    There are 68 schools for primary education, 12 schools for secondary education, and 5 universities. In 2007, there were 22,930 fulltime students registered.
    There are two private medical schools in Aruba: All Saints University of Medicine, Aruba and Xavier University School of Medicine, Aruba. All courses are presented in English. School's curriculum is based on the United States medical school model and will lead to a Doctor of Medicine degree that is recognized in North America.[4]


    Much more info on link:


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aruba?P...8e91e2aefb169e

  6. #26
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    This is an older article about "Schools on Aruba" but still interesting, IMO:

    http://www.arubaplaza.com/living-her...e-schools.html

  7. #27
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    Here is an older post from Lizzardo from this forum with some interesting info:

    Quote Originally Posted by lizzardo View Post
    There is also a group called the International Friends of Aruba. It has a group
    of ex-pat women with kids and have 'meet ups' all the time.

    Here is their website:
    http://www.angelfire.com/amiga2/ifaruba/

    I personally think Aruba is a great place for kids. They can run
    and play without a lot of the worries that are in the EU and States.
    If I had moved here earlier in life, I would have had kids here.

  8. #28
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    Smile back for short time

    Wow! This thread keeps getting better and better.
    I'm in a hurry now, I'm working, now moe than ever I need work and to save some money
    I'll drop by again in a few hours.
    Thank you for all the fine comments and information, it is all very useful.

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