Aruba Beach
Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Don't miss the parade

  1. #1
    Senior Member charles's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Walking the shorelines in the evenings
    Posts
    560

    Don't miss the parade

    Carnival on Aruba is not so much an event as it is the small mini-happenings that make up the totality of the event. You just have to look for them. Let me give you an example:

    Ever browse through your old high school year book and look at the home-room class picture? First you see the entire class and then notice the face that sat two seats in back of you – the face you seldom noticed, never spoke to (beyond the obligatory hello and goodbye) and consequentially never really knew. In looking at the class-picture, this student comes back at you through the ages and you start to feel the aura of that face. It is the face and aura of a stranger within a group. You then ask yourself – what was she like then and how about today? Finally a pang runs through your system for not having paid attention when it counted. Eventually, you wonder how (or if) you should call to say “Hi – my name is ….. and I was just looking through some old stuff and noticed our class picture and…” Perhaps not, but then again – could it hurt? The answer I live with is that people (even when they are details) need attention at the time you are with them and not in retrospect. At least that is the answer that works for me - and that makes paying attention to the details important and eventually a habit.



    It was the time just before the event. Pre-Grand-Parade is a good term. People walked openly on the streets and looked off to the sidewalk trailers to either notice or be noticed on this special day. Most trailers had their massive speakers pointed to the streets and most connected to tuners that were mostly on the same FM radio setting. The effect is something like walking down a tunnel of pulsating sound with walls made up of laughing faces. The senses are inundated with rhythms and aside from the sounds - the air is filled with BBQ - Balashi and abundance of laughter.

    The home made trailers line both sides of the streets that make up the parade route. Each trailer is painted with some sort o f a carnival message. These painted messages or “Slogans” all face the parade side of the street and as you walk down the parade route you see the wall of hand painted pictures much like a hysterical Caribbean Art Gallery. Here and there are more subtle gatherings. One of these is a large white tent that is sponsored by a local bank and bearing the initials CMB as its only decoration. No booze or Balashi in this group. No blaring ten foot towering speakers. Just wooden folding chairs in a series of rows and serenity – almost as if preparing for a tent church revival. This tent is for those that are challenged. They are challenged because they see a beauty we never will and do not know how to explain it in terms we would understand. Their music is the same as ours yet has a different rhythm all together – I know this because as a carnival calypso tune played, two boys danced (as if at cotillion) in a perfect waltz. To keep the waltz dance in good sequence, one of them repeated – One two three -- One two three. It all made so much sense especially in the midst of the Aruba Grand Parade Carnaval. Nothing out of place. It made sense – to me anyway.

    In the utmost last back row of seats under the tent canopy was something that did not make sense. An older man, also challenged, was sitting with his chair facing the ocean and with his back to what would be the carnival parade. He had a peaceful look on his face and was talking to the ocean. He said “ Wak – ta bunita” (Look – How pretty) He repeated this several times over and then closed his eyes. A lady that looked or seemed to be one of the caretakers for this group, asked him “Ta kiko ba wak dushi?” (What is it you saw sweety?) He thought a moment and then answered – “Carnival di piska chikitu” (A carnival of small fish). The lady put her hand on his shoulder and also looked out to sea. I imagine she was a bit challenged to see those fish yet she said “Bunita!” (Pretty!)

    If ever I feel that my powers of observation are OK, I will think on that moment and know that I am challenged to see what they did, because:
    here on Aruba
    while under a tent
    looking out to the ocean
    on a parade Sunday
    a carnival of fish swam by and
    so many of us missed the parade.


    be well
    charles
    THERE ARE PLACES TO SEE - STORIES TO TELL
    IMAGES TO HARNESS - AND MORE STORIES ON caribbean.tv
    be well
    charles

  2. #2
    Junior Member fromspain's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    27

    Smile thanks for sharing

    Wow! That was so deep and interesting. I enjoyed reading it. I congratulate you on your skills to see beyond the simple and obvious.
    While reading your post I could not help remembering a song I love but try to avoid listening to because it always make me cry, it's called "Aquellas pequeñas cosas" by Joan Manuel Serrat, a famous Spanish composer and poet.
    It means "Those little things" and it's sooooo melancholic and so true it hurts. One of those songs that touches your heart even if you resist.

    Please, enjoy:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hoCZ8H0RAsA

    Here I leave the lyrics, in Spanish (sorry)

    Uno se cree
    que las mató
    el tiempo y la ausencia.
    Pero su tren
    vendió boleto
    de ida y vuelta.

    Son aquellas pequeñas cosas,
    que nos dejó un tiempo de rosas
    en un rincón,
    en un papel
    o en un cajón.

    Como un ladrón
    te acechan detrás
    de la puerta.
    Te tienen tan
    a su merced
    como hojas muertas

    que el viento arrastra allá o aquí,
    que te sonríen tristes y
    nos hacen que
    lloremos cuando
    nadie nos ve.
    Last edited by fromspain; 03-08-2011 at 08:41 PM.

  3. #3
    Senior Member charles's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Walking the shorelines in the evenings
    Posts
    560

    Hi Spain

    That is a lovely piece you posted. Thank you for sharing.

    I am not sure if you got the full meaning of what I wrote. It is about the people that are mentally handicapped.

    be well
    charles
    THERE ARE PLACES TO SEE - STORIES TO TELL
    IMAGES TO HARNESS - AND MORE STORIES ON caribbean.tv
    be well
    charles

  4. #4
    Senior Member charles's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Walking the shorelines in the evenings
    Posts
    560
    I was moved to write it when I saw that one of the local banks had sponsored a full shaded area especially dedicated for the handicapped community of Aruba. I went into it (had to get permission) and sat for a while. From that I wrote "Don't Miss The Parade" About six months after writing it I put it on the internet.

    be well
    charles
    THERE ARE PLACES TO SEE - STORIES TO TELL
    IMAGES TO HARNESS - AND MORE STORIES ON caribbean.tv
    be well
    charles

  5. #5
    Junior Member fromspain's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    27

    Question lost in translation

    Quote Originally Posted by Caribbean-tattler View Post
    Carnival on Aruba is not so much an event as it is the small mini-happenings that make up the totality of the event. You just have to look for them. Let me give you an example:

    Ever browse through your old high school year book and look at the home-room class picture? First you see the entire class and then notice the face that sat two seats in back of you – the face you seldom noticed, never spoke to (beyond the obligatory hello and goodbye) and consequentially never really knew. In looking at the class-picture, this student comes back at you through the ages and you start to feel the aura of that face. It is the face and aura of a stranger within a group. You then ask yourself – what was she like then and how about today? Finally a pang runs through your system for not having paid attention when it counted. Eventually, you wonder how (or if) you should call to say “Hi – my name is ….. and I was just looking through some old stuff and noticed our class picture and…” Perhaps not, but then again – could it hurt? The answer I live with is that people (even when they are details) need attention at the time you are with them and not in retrospect. At least that is the answer that works for me - and that makes paying attention to the details important and eventually a habit.

    Maybe I didn't get the full meaning of your writing, since I thought you were talking about the little things in life that are the ones that really matter, the things that pass sometimes unnoticed and yet they might be the best part of a whole event.
    The example you gave about the high school year book is just an example among so many others.
    I thought that watching how a mentally disabled person could find in the sea "his own carnival" and shared it with someone who saw it too or pretended to see it out of pure love and sympathy, saying "bunita" was also an example of the little things that matter and add some extra spice to the flavor of what's supposed to be the carnival as we all know it.

    Then you come here and say your writing was just about the mentally disabled, well, pardon me, maybe it was just me who discovered in your post something that was not really there.
    Sometimes a fish is just a fish....I guess
    Last edited by fromspain; 03-09-2011 at 08:38 AM.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Arubalisa's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Any Aruba beach...
    Posts
    13,177
    Charles, having two people with "special needs" close to my heart, your words were extremely touching.

    If I ever have the opportunity to open a bank account in Aruba,
    Caribbean Merchantile Bank has my business. If only for doing the "right thing".

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO