Aruba Beach
Aruba Nights Island Guide
Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 48
Like Tree13Likes

Thread: Boa problems and open season

  1. #11
    Aruba since 1979
    Moderator
    Andrea J.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    29,947
    periodically there are notifications in the diario and the tourist newspapers and on the aruba tv news about the boa roundups.

    i mentioned before that they are not readily found in the hotel/beach area.

    the landscape people do kill them.
    lots of residents just kill them and do not bother with the <$6.00 bounty.

    the people of aruba including the government are actively trying to exterminate these creatures from their island.

    the small mammals and birds are threatened severely by the boas.

    we have seen them dead in the road as road kill......never in the area of the hotels.

    another miserable creature that needs to be eliminated is the lionfish.
    periodically there is a lionfish hunt.
    don't know if there is ever a bounty though.

    http://www.aruba.com/forum/f10/atten...rkelers-41083/
    check out above thread for lionfish thread
    Last edited by Andrea J.; 04-12-2012 at 09:20 PM.

  2. #12
    Senior Member arubabob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Eagle Beach, Baby Beach, Arashi Beach Tierra Del Sol golf course
    Posts
    1,202
    Quote Originally Posted by solden_56 View Post
    they are wanting them brought in alive because lots of people were just picking them up off the road dead and bringing them in.
    So what? Give the person 10 whole florins even if it is road kill.

  3. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    675
    Quote Originally Posted by taxidriver View Post
    That's a good boa .... those from the street.
    Hahaha you beat me to it!

  4. #14
    Aruba since 1979
    Moderator
    Andrea J.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    29,947
    nope, they do not want them brought in dead
    in my first post i forgot to put in a wink in my "dead or alive" post.
    i will go back to that post and add the smilie.

    yes they want the boas to DIE
    but the bounty from what i have read is not for ones brought in dead.
    (dead snakes SMELL omgosh you would not believe the stench of a dead snake)

    my question is.............. just how many people are brave enough to
    pick up a live one and bring it to the "collection station (wherever or whatever that may be)" ?

    10 florins!!!
    maybe for 1000 florins i would consider my husband catching one.

    member, billstellar, came across one on a hike and her guide snatched it up and was going to "take care of it" or "bring it to the powers that be"



    Quote Originally Posted by arubabob View Post
    So what? Give the person 10 whole florins even if it is road kill.

  5. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Arashi Beach, Boca Catalina Beach, Light house
    Posts
    32
    From what i know there is a bounty on the loinfish as well. Believe it is about the same going price as the boa's. Though i am no sure on the dead or alive thing on the fish HaHa

  6. #16
    Senior Member tangy003's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Palm Beach
    Age
    57
    Posts
    290
    We've been visiting for quite a few years now and never have I seen a snake.(dead or alive)Now gettin' trampled by the Iguanas is a different story.LOLOL

    See you all there tomorrow early afternoon.

  7. #17
    Senior Member Arubalisa's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Any Aruba beach...
    Posts
    13,177
    Training on catching the boas is being scheduled. Lion fish are wanted dead or alive (they are edible), however there is no ongoing bounty program, though there are hunts such as this boa hunt for bounties scheduled from time to time.

    Bounty on Boas being offered by Arikok Park from April 16 to May 16

    ORANJESTAD - A wanted poster is making the rounds of island media, as the call goes out from rangers and management of the Arikok National Park that a bounty has been placed on boa constrictors, an invasive species not native to the island, which is seriously endangering indigenous wildlife.

    A few organized hunts have taken place, but the results have not been encouraging; now the park, through sponsorship from Fantastic Gardens, La Cabana Beach Resort and Iguana Joe’s restaurant are offering 10 Aruban florins, ($5.57) per live boa turned into their headquarters at the park entrance. The period of paid collection begins on Monday, April 16 and will end on Wednesday, May 16.

    During that time, those that have trapped and bagged live boas can turn them to Park Rangers Salvador Franken and Agapito Gomez. There will be a final accounting with first, second and third place prizes awarded to those who have brought in the great number of boas, the runner-up, and for the largest snake captured.

    Exactly when and how the species was first introduced to Aruba is unknown, but in a few years they have prolife*rated at an alarming rate, gi*ving live birth to up to 64 young at one time; there are no native animals which threaten even the new born boas. The largest found on Aruba so far measures 2.9 meters, nearly 10 ft long.

    Rangers Franken and Gomez demonstrated to media the differences between the boa and one of Aruba’s endemic snakes, the Santanero, or Aruban Cat-eyed Snake, which is typically less than 50 cm long. The Santanero is a vital part of Aruba’s eco-system, helping to control mice and other vermin, and snake hunters are warned not to harm them. Homeowners that find them in their yards are also asked to leave them alone. The public is reminded to take note of the differences between the boa and the Santanero, as well as the native Aruban Cascabal, or rattlesnake, which is an endangered species.

    The proliferation of boas over the past 10 years is causing quite some concern to conservationists. A scientific team from Texas did an extensive study as to how they are impacting the local wildlife, and it is estimated that local population of an estimated 2000+ boas consumes 52,000 indigenous species annually, which is divided in thirds by birds, mammals and reptiles. 100 boas were caught in January of this year, but staff of the Aruba Boa Task Force assume for every boa found there are at least another 4 in the bush.

    Boas can be turned in to the park office daily from 10:00 AM until 3:00 PM. An information night to acquaint potential hunters with techniques for bagging and tagging will be conducted soon at a date yet to be announced. For more information contact Salvador Franken at 592-0778.

  8. #18
    Senior Member arubabob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Eagle Beach, Baby Beach, Arashi Beach Tierra Del Sol golf course
    Posts
    1,202
    Quote Originally Posted by Andrea J. View Post

    my question is.............. just how many people are brave enough to
    pick up a live one and bring it to the "collection station (wherever or whatever that may be)" ?

    10 florins!!!
    maybe for 1000 florins i would consider my husband catching one.

    "
    We have rattlesnake hunts here in Oklahoma every year. Ive been on 2 of them but never saw a snake when hunting. Plenty of them brought in though. Its kinda like a fair or strawberry festival setting. The little town of Okeene hosts it each year. They have rides and games and all kinds of fair food and bbq. You can even get bbqd rattlesnake. Tastes like a cross between chicken and frog legs.

    p.s. You dont pick them up with your hands, you use a snake stick.
    Last edited by arubabob; 04-13-2012 at 10:51 AM.

  9. #19
    Aruba since 1979
    Moderator
    Andrea J.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    29,947
    from a friend who works for DePalm on Aruba:
    Hey Andrea- hope all is well. I saw the thread about the boa hunt. The local news had an interview with the rangers. They want the snakes alive so people don't accidentally kill the santerneros (garden snakes) as they look similar to one untrained.

  10. #20
    Senior Member Lewny1's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Divi links, pool, beach, lighthouse, Arikok National Park, etc.
    Posts
    355
    Just returned from Aruba yesterday. Found out about the Boa and Lionfish problems from one of the ladies who works at the Donkey Sanctuary (not Desiree). She did say that the Lion fish are actually supposed to be tasty; however, I will not be pleased if they start eating all the Wahoo!!!! Hopefully, they can get these problems under control. She said the Boas most likely come in on containers that are importing goods from South America.

Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO