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Thread: Boa problems and open season

  1. #21
    Aruba since 1979
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    Andrea J.'s Avatar
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    re: where the boas come from.

    they may come in the containers.
    i had never heard that they came into the country that way....but it is a thought !!

    i also heard that they are brought onto aruba as "pets" (omgosh ).

    when the pet gets too large to be cute and cuddly, the owner dumps them outside.

    if you folks want to read about a huge snake problem.....google "everglades, boas, pythons"

    this boa problem on aruba might/likely be a man made problem.
    a friend of mine on aruba, a restaurant owner told me when he was a kid, one of his neighbors had 2 boas. those 2 boas had numerous offspring.

    off topic.......
    we live in florida.
    we live in a gated golf course community with 70 ponds and lakes.
    it is like living in jurassic park. alligators and snakes.
    there are 4 venomous snakes indigenous to my neighborhood
    coral, rattler, pygmy rattler and water moccasin

    and the regular non venomous snakes.....black racer, python and boa (python and boa are man made problems)

    so with that in mind...........
    we came home from aruba on dec 23 late afternoon.
    we were sitting on our lanai having an iced coffee.
    the lanai is also called a florida room. it is a 12 x 20 room that is all windows/screens and we use it constantly and it is weather tight. it leads directly into the living room.
    so, we are sitting there drinking our iced coffee and there at my feet is a 3' snakeskin. a snake came into my house while we were away, shed his skin and then left.
    the next 24 hours was a living hell.
    every piece of furniture in the house was moved looking for the owner of the skin.

    i HATE snakes.

    now back on to the topic of "boa roundup" i am sorry i went way off topic.


    Quote Originally Posted by Lewny1 View Post
    Just returned from Aruba yesterday. Found out about the Boa and Lionfish problems from one of the ladies who works at the Donkey Sanctuary (not Desiree). She did say that the Lion fish are actually supposed to be tasty; however, I will not be pleased if they start eating all the Wahoo!!!! Hopefully, they can get these problems under control. She said the Boas most likely come in on containers that are importing goods from South America.

  2. #22
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    My dear friend. Andrea....I share your pain; insofar as "I hate snakes." I hope that "PETA" does not put out a "contract on me!"...I love animals; but "snakes," no thank you! I have met up with a few Copperhead snakes here in N. Virginia; but, you can rest assured, I gave them a wide-berth! I hope that after the "Shakedown," of all the furniture and everything moveable, that you were not only relieved; but that you sat down and got a much-needed rest.

    Ed

  3. #23
    Senior Member charles's Avatar
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    I despise the bloody things. They are out of placed and not (as was once written) "Cute and lovely natural animals." They are out of place and out out to eat eat eat. The only soul I find more confusing than this BOA is the man who let them loose
    THERE ARE PLACES TO SEE - STORIES TO TELL
    IMAGES TO HARNESS - AND MORE STORIES ON caribbean.tv
    be well
    charles

  4. #24

  5. #25
    Senior Member Tom and Stanley's Avatar
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    I have a question - what are they doing with the captured ones? ? ? ? ?

    Tom and Stanley

  6. #26
    Senior Member Chrisvec's Avatar
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    Almond crusted Boa anyone!
    9th trip to Aruba in

  7. #27
    Aruba since 1979
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    Andrea J.'s Avatar
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    they are captured and killed.
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom and Stanley View Post
    I have a question - what are they doing with the captured ones? ? ? ? ?

    Tom and Stanley

  8. #28
    Senior Member Tom and Stanley's Avatar
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    If they kill them, why do you have to turn in live ones? ? ? ? Why not just kill em and bring in the corpse? ? ? ? I ran over with the car last year and a couple of builders picked it up with a shovel and tossed into the weeds. . . . I guess the other wild critters ate it as it was gone a few days later. . . .

    Tom and Stanley

  9. #29
    Aruba since 1979
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    they are asking that the boas be brought in alive so that it is certain that the "right snakes" are being eliminated and not the ones native to the island.

  10. #30
    Senior Member Arubalisa's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by solden_56 View Post
    they are wanting them brought in alive because lots of people were just picking them up off the road dead and bringing them in.
    Quote Originally Posted by Andrea J. View Post
    they are asking that the boas be brought in alive so that it is certain that the "right snakes" are being eliminated and not the ones native to the island.


    Quote Originally Posted by Arubalisa View Post
    Rangers Franken and Gomez demonstrated to media the differences between the boa and one of Aruba’s endemic snakes, the Santanero, or Aruban Cat-eyed Snake, which is typically less than 50 cm long. The Santanero is a vital part of Aruba’s eco-system, helping to control mice and other vermin, and snake hunters are warned not to harm them. Homeowners that find them in their yards are also asked to leave them alone. The public is reminded to take note of the differences between the boa and the Santanero, as well as the native Aruban Cascabal, or rattlesnake, which is an endangered species.

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