pier
Aruba Nights Island Guide
Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Booster Shots?

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    29

    Booster Shots?

    Hi, I live in Ontario, Canada and will be travelling to Aruba for the first time in May. Do I have to make sure that I get any kind of medical booster shots, i.e. hep. C vaccination, before I go? Or is this just for other countries?

  2. #2
    Member Lynn R's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Divi Village Costa Linda Down town
    Posts
    65
    Hi no you do not need to have any shots to go to Aruba. It's a very safe Island.
    I also live in Ontario!!! Been going to Aruba now for 14 years and just loving every moment we are there!!!
    Enjoy and have fun!

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    1,654

    Another person from Ontario

    Hi,
    I also live in Ontario and I say YES!! One of our closest friends is head of infectious disease and he HIGHLY recommends Hep A for anyone who travels. It is easy and safe but must be done one month prior to travel. It involves two series of shots. We have done it and we immunized our children years ago. One can contract Hep A anywhere (usually from inproper hand washing after bathroom use) but it is so easily preventable with proper immunization. There are a lot of TV ads explaining about Heb A & B and telling you if you travel to the Carribean to immunized (the add shows a beach with a couple walking). Many people don't do it but if you speak with a doctor who is familiar with infectious disease or contact a travel clinic they will definately advise you to get immunized. If something happens, it is too late then to say I should have....


    IT HAS ABSOULETLY NOTHING TO DO WITH A SAFE OR CLEAN ISLAND.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Arubalisa's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Any Aruba beach...
    Posts
    12,582
    Imo, if you travel anywhere, a Hep A vaccination can never be a bad idea. I contracted Hep A as a teen years ago, while traveling on class trip to Washington, DC. So not necessarily an Aruba only related sickness.

    Health Information for Travelers to Aruba: CDC - US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    "Risk for Travelers
    Hepatitis A is one of the most common vaccine-preventable infections acquired during travel (3,4). The number of cases associated with travel, as well as the overall incidence, has decreased in recent years, according to notifiable disease data in the United States and Europe (3,5). However, the proportion of overall cases attributed to travel has increased in the United States. Among reported cases in persons younger than 15 years old, 40% were associated with travel (5). The risk for acquiring HAV infection for U.S. residents traveling abroad varies with living conditions, length of stay, and the incidence of HAV infection in the area visited. Travelers to North America (except Mexico), Japan, Australia, New Zealand, and developed countries in Europe are at no greater risk for infection than in the United States. For travelers to other countries, risk for infection increases with duration of travel and is highest for those who live in or visit rural areas, trek in back-country areas, or frequently eat or drink in settings of poor sanitation. Nevertheless, many cases of travel-related hepatitis A occur in travelers to developing countries with “standard” tourist itineraries, accommodations, and food consumption behaviors (2)."

    Hepatitis A vaccine: World Health Organization

    Along with PCV, DTaP, Hib, IPV, MMR, Varicella and MCV4, Hep A & B vaccines are now routinely reccommended for chidren.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO