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Thread: "energy independence and 0 carbon footprint article"

  1. #1
    Aruba since 1979
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    Andrea J.'s Avatar
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    "energy independence and 0 carbon footprint article"

    http://www.ecoseed.org/business/othe...ndence-by-2020

    please no ragging on me re: the wind turbines. i am just forwarding the article

  2. #2
    Senior Member Arubalisa's Avatar
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    Still not happy with wind turbines at Alto Vista but certainly not Andrea's fault
    They are a done deal just like the Ritz

  3. #3
    Senior Member danadog56's Avatar
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    not sure how I feel about it.....if it is more eco-friendly then that is good, but if it destroys the beautiful landscape which is one of the reasons I love the island so much then it's bad........
    guess we will just have to wait and see.....
    ARUBA....HOME AWAY FROM HOME

  4. #4
    Senior Member Arubalisa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by danadog56 View Post
    but if it destroys the beautiful landscape which is one of the reasons I love the island so much then it's bad........
    I could not agree more.

    The inhabitants of Alto Vista suffered from a plague and the chapel was deserted in 1816, falling into ruins. In 1952 the chapel was rebuilt and has become not only a tourist attraction, but a spot for meditation.

    It is logical to put turbines on the windward side of the island, but imo there is a lot of coastline at the south end of Arikok to Grapefield to Boca Grande.

    HOWEVER I am not a resident, I am a tourist. I have no say, except to express an opinion on a forum.


  5. #5
    Senior Member danadog56's Avatar
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    wonder if we asked the ata if we could voice our opinion...as tourists....would it make any difference ???
    ARUBA....HOME AWAY FROM HOME

  6. #6
    Aruba since 1979
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    You certainly can try, but this whole wind farm project is now in the courts from what I have read.
    tomorrow I will find some Facebook links where you can read and "like" and become involved.

    Quote Originally Posted by danadog56 View Post
    wonder if we asked the ata if we could voice our opinion...as tourists....would it make any difference ???

  7. #7
    Aruba since 1979
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    Here is one of the links
    www.savealtovista.com

    also in search bar of Facebook type in. Save alto vista and then hit like
    https://www.facebook.com/SaveAltoVista?fref=ts
    Last edited by Andrea J.; 06-20-2013 at 09:33 AM.

  8. #8
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  9. #9
    Senior Member charles's Avatar
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    SELDOM - so very SELDOM - am I irritated by tourists. I dislike "Closet-Protesters" This is one of those moments. I have repeated over and over, YOU COUNT. YOU ARE THE SINGLE MOST IMPORTANT VOICE ON THE ISLAND. Write your letters. Make your calls. Say what is on your mind. Aruba has spent many millions to keep you happy. The island will not throw that away. ATA has chosen their path. It is election time. Would I want to be the political figuree that screwed up tourism?

    Charles
    THERE ARE PLACES TO SEE - STORIES TO TELL
    IMAGES TO HARNESS - AND MORE STORIES ON caribbean.tv
    be well
    charles

  10. #10
    Aruba since 1979
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    The Caribbean Island Of Aruba To Run Solely On Sustainable Energy By 2020 Featured

    Aruba Tourism Authority


    PrinteMail



    ORANJESTAD (ATA) -- The 70 square-mile island of Aruba is on track to becoming the world's first sustainable energy economy and achieving the goal of running on 100 percent sustainable energy by 2020.

    In recent years, sustainability efforts within the travel industry have progressed from a niche consideration to an industry-wide priority; 96% of Conde Nast Traveler readers believe hotels and resorts should be responsible for protecting the environment in which they operate.
    Following efforts to reduce dependency on fossil fuels and CO2 emissions, Aruba built the Vader Piet Windmill Farm in winter of 2009. Located on the island's northern coast are 10, 180-meter high wind turbines that currently produce 20 percent of Aruba's electricity. Plans are in progress for a second wind farm, which will double the energy capacity and continue to decrease Aruba's carbon footprint.
    Professor Daniel P. Schrag, director of the Center for Environmental Studies at Harvard University and member of the Advisory Council on Science and Technology to President Obama explains, "Few places in the world approach 50 percent renewable energy use, and Aruba could soon be at nearly 40 percent with a second wind farm."
    The island's constant supply of sun, eastern trade winds and ocean currents allow for research and field-testing of renewable energy technologies. In June 2012, Prime Minister Mike Eman and entrepreneur Richard Branson announced a partnership between Aruba and the Carbon War Room, an initiative that seeks to reduce global carbon emission. The partnership will transition the island to 100 percent renewable energy while eliminating any reliance on fossil fuels and will create a model for other countries to replicate.
    "The opportunities for renewable development on Aruba are really extraordinary...Aruba could truly be a model to the world in terms of a sustainable place to live and work," says Harvard Professor George Baker.
    Aruba's private sector is also committed to preserving and protecting the environment, which is evident in the island's several certified and sustainable hotel and resort properties. EarthCheck, the premier international certification alliance for sustainable travel and tourism, complies with the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC) Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories, the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD) Greenhouse Gas Protocol, and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 114064 range of standards for greenhouse gas accounting. To date, six resorts on-island are certified by EarthCheck and eight are on the road to achieving certification.
    In addition to pursuing alternative energy initiatives, locals and visitors alike join together for the Aruba Reef Care Project, the island's largest volunteer environmental initiative. The project has attracted more than 800 people annually since 1994 and results in cleaner reefs, public beaches and shallow waters.
    Bianca Peters, a Dutch expert in sustainability in Aruba's Department of General Affairs, commends the One happy island's green initiatives and the probability for significant global impact: "I decided to come here because of how the people in Aruba think. The energy here is amazing, we can make things happen—especially sustainability—because of the scale of the island, all the natural elements Aruba has, and the enthusiasm of the people living here. I believe living sustainably is the future for the world."
    For more information on Aruba's sustainability efforts, visit the new www.Aruba.com. Engage with Aruba via social media at www.facebook.com/ArubaFans or @ArubaTourism.
    About Aruba
    As one of the most revisited destinations in the Caribbean, Aruba -- One Happy Island -- is an island of contradictions, where pristine turquoise waters collide against the desert-like terrain of the north shore; where peace and relaxation coexist with wild and rugged adventures; where Dutch influence meets American ease; and where a diverse history parallels a bright future. Nestled in the Southern Caribbean on the fringes of the hurricane belt, the island is just a two-and-a-half hour flight from Miami and a four-hour flight from New York City and also boasts year-round cooling trade winds and an average 82 degree temperature. Aruba offers beach lovers, adrenaline junkies, relaxation seekers and everyone in between a slice of paradise, including breathtaking beaches, a booming culinary scene, world famous festivals and events, exciting land and water activities, art galleries and museums, sumptuous spas, championships golf and exclusive shopping. With all-inclusive resorts, boutique hotels in charming Eagle Beach, high-rise branded hotels in Palm Beach or a cosmopolitan city hotel in Oranjestad, the island of contradictions provides the perfect getaway for first-time guests and loyal visitors.

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