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    "Green Aruba" Conferences

    Here is an article about the "Green Aruba III" conference which took place last year in October (2012).


    Green Aruba III is officially launched with high expectations


    PRIME MINISTER EMAN “TOGETHER WITH CARBON WAR ROOM, ARUBA IS TAKING A LEADERSHIP ROLE WITH THE CONCEPT OF SUSTAINABLE GROWTH IN THE DEEPEST SENSE OF THE WORDS”



    ORANJESTAD – With positive developments, encouraging news and high expectations, Green Aruba III was officially launched in the Dr. Edward Cheung Centre for Innovation. Prime Minister Eman, Minister de Meza, Mr. Frank Hoevertsz and the young Aruban engineer of TNO, Mr. Ivan Flanegin, had a press conference to make the announcement. A broad range of prominent speakers will be in Aruba on October 3, 4 and 5 to present and contribute to the reputable and indispensable Green Aruba III conference with its main topic alternative energy. Speakers and participants from across the globe are proud to be part of Green Aruba. Aruba, a small island taking giant steps to move forward into the future.


    Director of Utilities, Mr. Frank Hoevertsz, opened the press conference announcing that Green Aruba III has all the indications of being another great success, as was Green Aruba I & II. Prime Minister Eman said that a few weeks ago a delegation of Aruba attended Rio +20 where Aruba manifested itself as a leader in the conversion from conventional to alternative energy. Eman “We announced our plans to collaborate with Carbon War Room together with Sir Richard Branson. In cooperation with Carbon War Room and TNO, Aruba is taking a leadership role with the concept of sustainable growth in the deepest sense of the words – a sustainable development combined with a good quality of life, conservation of what nature has to offer us and sustainable societies – all this in the right form and equilibrium is how we would like to shape the growth”.


    Mr. Eman is satisfied, impressed and proud with the job by the team that has prepared the Green Aruba Conference III. “Together with the vision of our country, the ‘Green Team’ has placed Aruba in the favorable position to be able to welcome a Green Conference - just as we know Rio+20 we will host Aruba+20. This because we have our eyes set on 2020 which is the moment that Aruba will reach record levels internationally in terms of renewable energy. Aruba will accomplish this with the realization of large-scale projects”.


    Two years ago in Aruba, a dream that became an ideal, an ambition and a passion came from minds of visionaries. A vision was born of where we would like to take Aruba. Eman “Together we pledged to make the dream, ideal and ambition a reality. This was the start for the first Green Aruba Conference in 2010. The first results of this pledge are today a reality here, in this building where TNO is housed. Two years ago too we were here on the scene also making statements of our wishes to have a ‘research institute’ for Aruba”. That institute arrived and is conducting large amounts of research on alternative energy. Exciting plans are on the table to be executed that will ultimately benefit all of Aruba.

    (Picture at link)
    http://www.greenaruba.org/index.php?page=news26

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    Here is an article about the upcoming "Green Aruba IV" conference which will take place in October this year, AFTER the election. The election is on September 27.
    I wonder if those plans include the windmills. In the agenda, "Wind" is included as a speaker's subject.

    I did not see a date on this article but there is a "countdown to Green Aruba" on the right side of the website which states at the moment:
    15 days, 11 hours, 14 min


    Green Aruba IV - Our road to 2020 - Aruba




    By 2020 Aruba will be the leading example for the application of renewable energy in a small island economy.


    The island of Aruba is committed to increase its sustainability and reducing its carbon foot print by using the abundant of sun and wind for which the island is already famous.


    This year Aruba is proud to be Co-Hosting the 2013 Caribbean Renewable Energy Forum (CREF 2013), the region's largest gathering of regional and international energy stakeholders. CREF 2013 will take place on October 10th-11th. For more information on CREF please visit www.caribbeanenergyforum.com.


    On October 9th, the day preceding CREF, we are excited to announce the hosting of Green Aruba IV. Where CREF's perspective is regional, Green Aruba is firmly focused on developments in Aruba's energy sector and on opportunities for international investment moving forward.


    Featuring a full day of sessions, and with the confirmed participation of senior Aruba government and utility officials and executives, we invite you to join us at Green Aruba and:




    • Get to grips with the range of opportunities which are emerging in Aruba for investment in RE/EE projects and initiatives
    • Meet high-ranking government officials and senior utility executives
    • Forge new relationships with key decision-makers
    • Meet potential private sector partners from Aruba
    • Develop business in what is a progressive, well regulated, renewable-friendly jurisdiction



    View the Green Aruba agenda
    View the CREF agenda
    Register for CREF and Green Aruba
    Register for Green Aruba only

    Download Brochure Green Aruba IV

    http://www.greenaruba.org/index.php?page=default

    (Sorry, I could not manage to post the picture as a thumbnail)

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    Program Green Aruba IV | CREF 2013

    http://www.greenaruba.org/index.php?page=program


    (On Day 3 "Wind" Technology will be discussed)

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    Field Excursion Exploring Aruba: Earth System Science and Sustainable Development

    On this one day fieldtrip, Saturday October 12th, you will explore the Island of Aruba to learn and view "hands-on" how earth sciences and sustainable development go hand in hand. The excursion will be guided by a team of experts in the field of integrated Earth Sciences. The Island of Aruba will form the backdrop to learn how the geological evolution of the Lesser Antilles has shaped natural resources. You will visit multiple sites, including the Arikok National Park, and learn how the geological record provides insight in the effects of land-sea interaction and the impact of geo-hazards. Aruba case history will be used to give you insight what consequences this has for sustainable development.


    This excursion is intended for both professionals with an interest in sustainable development but with no background in Earth Sciences as well as Earth Science professionals. The excursion is open for registration to both Green Aruba and CREF delegates.

    This excursion is organized by TNO in partnership with Earth Dynamics.

    More Info at link:

    http://www.greenaruba.org/index.php?page=fieldtrip

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    Aruba Green Energy Conference 2013 – detailing progress on “Our Road to 2020″


    On 9 Oct, 2013 At 11:19 PM | Categorized As Local | With 0 Comments

    The Aruban government is very proud to be host to the Caribbean Renewable Energy Forum (CREF) this year, an international arena for hundreds of ministers, administrators, scientists, engineers, technology providers and investors, and conservationists to learn and network. CREF is partnering with the fourth Green Aruba Energy Conference, which occupied yesterday, the first day of the three-day event, focusing on Aruba’s plans and progress to attain the stated goal of 100% sustainability by the year 2020.

    Such a goal is a far-reaching and multi-faceted mission, weaving together the threads of countless elements to produce the whole cloth of an island nation completely independent from fossil fuels, particularly oil, for its energy needs. It takes the vision of a multitude of individuals working diligently towards this result, and the opening ceremonies yesterday morning in the Westin Aruba Resort featured speakers representing some of the companies and groups involved.

    Unfortunately, keynote speaker Prime Minister Mike Eman, the primal force behind this vision of a 100% sustainable Aruba, was unable to attend due doctor’s orders. Officially welcoming delegates from across the region, the U.S., Latin America and Europe, was the Managing Director of Utilities Aruba N.V. Franklin Hoevertz.

    “The task of attaining and maintaining sustainability had begun, but it will never end,” began Mr. Hoevertz. He expressed his belief that this year’s partnership with CREF is a fundamental necessity and a great step forward. “It will create a great synergy.”

    “Sustainability is not only about energy, ” he concluded, “though this is our focus today. It affects all other areas of our society.
    Tourism- without sustainable tourism we are going no where. Neighborhoods, building codes…sustainability is not only for energy, it is for the whole society. It is not an option; it is a must. We owe it to ourselves, our children, and the coming generations.

    Aruba’s Minister of Finance, Telecommunications, Utilities and Energy, Mike de Meza, is the de facto host of the annual event. He discussed how Aruba’s ambition of 100% sustainability is essential to the island’s economic welfare, and his hopes that the concerted, cooperative action will inspire others in the region. He chronically detailed the events that brought the current administration to it stated goal with the setting of a deadline to achieving it.

    Since this decision, Minster de Meza detailed some of the progress made, particularly in establishing more efficient manners of producing electricity and the potable drinking water. The additional, and an important benefit of these methods, is reduced CO2 emissions from Aruba’s water and power plant, W.E.B.

    Aside from a wind farm that is already operating, the island is in the process of building a solar field at the airport, and the agreement has been signed for a bio-fuel plant, produced from the island’s waste. The latter will have a doubly-important impact on the sustainability issue, as it will result in fuel while productively disposing of Aruba’s refuse.

    The next two gentlemen to the podium had only praise for Aruba’s sustainability goals and methods in attaining them. Chairman of CREF, Jerry Butler, from The Bahamas, applauded the fact that since his last visit to the island, W.E.B. has cut their daily oil requirements for producing energy and water by over 30%.

    He explained how CREF was founded with Englishman Matthew Perk, because they both agreed that one of the most significant challenges for developers looking at the Caribbean is the cost of energy. “I have people with millions of dollars they wish to invest in a hotel infrastructure, and they are looking for a place with sand, sea and sun.” In The Bahamas, operating costs of a resort facility would run about .42 cents per kwh. On Aruba, it is now 30. cents per kwh. In Florida, it is .16 cents per kwh.

    “If you are a pure capitalist as I am,” continued Mr. Butler, “where do you think you are going to put your money? This is why costs of energy, and our ability to focus on that challenge, has become so important to us. The cost of energy affects the competitiveness of our economies. Each and every Caribbean nation, and Aruba is no exception, has to deal with the fact that our energy plant is fueled by fossil fuels, which is directly tied to the cost of oil per barrel…we are simply talking about an unsustainable way to make a living. We cannot afford to continue to power our power plants with oil. “

    “This brings us to why what you are doing in Aruba is so important. Many Caribbean countries that I have consulted with, I end up thinking, “Wow, these guys are great talkers!” But you folks in Aruba, you are not talkers-you are doers.”

    “What is interesting about Green Aruba and the team we have worked with, is they are so young, energetic and vibrant; they are enthusiastic, innovative and they want to get things done. Most of those I work with regarding energy in the Caribbean have been retired for a 100 years… Here we are, for the first time, partnering with a country where not only has everyone the want and the need, but the drive and desire to succeed.”

    Aside from the tangible actions and methods put into place to reduce oil dependability, he lauded Aruba’s educational efforts and “robust campaign” to change the thinking of the populace regarding recycling and reusing, along with personally deploying renewable energy sources.

    Following Mr. Butler, The COO of the Carbon War Room, Peter Boyd, who is also Chair of the Energy Efficient Deployment Office at the Department of Energy and Climate Change, UK, came to the podium, He outlined the Carbon War Room’s support for Aruba and observances regarding the potential profitability of switching to renewable energy sources, which complement the immediate and urgent necessity of reducing carbon emissions. He also unveiled their new publication dedicated to the subject,

    “Smart Growth Pathways: Building a Green Platform for Sustainable Aruba”
    Mr. Boyd’s talk and conclusions will be examined in depth in one of several follow-up articles on the Aruba Green Energy Conference/CREF to be published in THE MORNING NEWS over the next week.

    By Rosalie Klein

    (Photos at link):
    http://themorningnewsaruba.com/local...-road-to-2020/

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    Green Energy Conference 2013 closes with Wubbo Ockels recipient of the first


    On 10 Oct, 2013 At 11:22 PM | Categorized As Local, Technology | With 0 Comments

    "Green Aruba" Conferences-gre6-559x350.jpg

    The first day of the three-day event bringing together legislators, technology innovators and potential investors, all focused on renewable energy projects and sustainability programs, ended with recognition for a pioneer in the field, Professor Dr. Wubbo Ockels.

    This year’s energy confe*rence is a collaboration between Green Aruba and the Caribbean Renewable Energy Forum (CREF); the first day was devoted entirely to Aruba’s efforts, with the declared go*- vernment policy of being 100% sustainable by the year 2020. Yesterday and today, the international coterie of energy experts and ministers have been conducting seminars and workshops as part of the CREF initiative.

    The Aruba Green Energy conference closed on Wednesday afternoon with a final address by Aruba’s Minister of Finance, Communications, Utilities and Energy, Mike de Meza. He summed up all Aruba has done over the past four years, and plans to do in the near future to achieve complete oil independence by 2020, at the very least, if not the final goal of a total reduction of carbon emissions.

    Minister de Meza stood in for Prime Minister Mike Eman, who was too ill to attend the day’s events. The Prime Minister did attend the CREF opening ceremonies the following morning to deliver his address, but on doctor’s orders, could not attend the Green Energy Conference.
    In closing, Minister de Meza first accepted the gift of a book by Strategic Spatial Planner and Change Agent, Geert Koo
    "Green Aruba" Conferences-gre13-300x170.jpg
    istra of Planosfeer in Holland. Paralleling Aruba’s Green Energy Conference is a separate event targeting island youth at the secondary school age. Dr. Kooistra had participated in the 2012 “Green s’Cool” program, working with the Director of Aruba’s National Library Astrid Britten, and staff member Ronny Alders. He also accompanied Aruba’s library staff to the prestigious American Library Association annual congress this year, to present new strategies recognizing libraries as active community partners in response to the rapid changes in planning and described practices of sustainability.

    Dr. Kooistra was greatly impressed by “this great Aruban example “and declared Holland should be very proud of “its little brother,” and that the island was teaching the world what could be done, rather than just talking about things.” He reports he had promised the students he worked with that he would publish a book about their projects, and has made good on his word, in both Dutch and English versions. It is more of a workbook, beautifully illustrated with the many exciting photographs he took of the enthusiastic participation and creativity he observed. The English version is also aimed as a teaching aid to be distributed by ACURIL, the association of Caribbean libraries, for them to reach out to other islands, and inspire them to follow Aruba’s example.

    Minister de Meza was the first to receive this book, along with Genevieve Leeuw of the VNO, the Dutch mission to Aruba. More copies went to the Aruba National Library, and Dr. Kooistra also presented the minister with a beautiful panoramic montage of the photographs.

    The final event of the Green Aruba Conference was the inaugural presentation of the Aruba Sustainability Award, which went to Holland’s first astronaut to go into space on the Challenger shuttle, Dr. Wubbo Ockels. Professor of Aerospace for Sustainable Engineering and Technology at the Delft University of Technology, he has been a great friend to the conference from its inception in 2010. He was the keynote speaker at the inaugural welcoming event that year, as a world-renowned proponent and innovator in the field of renewable energy technology.

    Dr. Ockels has also made headlines for his project, the “Ecolution,” a fully sustainable sailboat, running only on renewable energies. Its maiden voyage crossed the Atlantic to Aruba. He remained on the island with his wife to participate in programs in island schools and inspire Aruban youth regarding careers in sustainable technology, and smart practices they could take home to their families.

    Unfortunately, Dr. Ockels could not be on Aruba to receive the award, as he was again mentoring the Luna Solar Car team from TU Delft in preparation for the world races in Australia. One of his former students, Aruban Javier Sint Jago, who was also one of the crew on the maiden voyage of the Ecolution, accepted the award on his behalf. On a very upbeat note, Javier announced that the Luna solar car team, many of which are Arubans studying at TU Delft, now held a sizable lead during the World Solar Challenge, a 2000-mile race through the Australian Outback, with every expectation of winning the race.
    Dr. Ockels did send a video, in which he was wearing a tee shirt with his signature motto “I am an astronaut on Spaceship Earth.” He congratulated the Prime Minister on his recent resounding success in the national elections on September 27, and felt the AVP party should “take it as a crown on your work and initiatives towards a Green Aruba. It is an opportunity to finish and complete all the initiatives you have taken in the last four years.”

    Dr. Ockels expressed his gratitude for being invited to be a part of the program and visit island schools. “For me, a giant experience, even if for you only a small step…I remember, when visiting the schools, the young Arubans and the sparkle in their eyes when I spoke of space and my experiences.”

    He also pointed out, in his opinion, Aruba has a very unique combination of physical, philosophical and intellectual assets that make it an ideal venue for the advancement of a sustainable society. “I think that you can well become a green pearl of our kingdom; an example for the other islands of the kingdom, and the other Caribbean islands.”


    Rosalie Klein

    http://themorningnewsaruba.com/techn...-of-the-first/

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    Prime Minister Mike Eman reminds delegates of the Caribbean Renewable Energy Forum that it is not only about the technology, but the “quality of life”


    On 11 Oct, 2013 At 12:53 AM | Categorized As Local | With 0 Comments

    "Green Aruba" Conferences-ene3-561x350.jpg

    This year, in conjunction with its annual Green Aruba Energy Conference, the island is hos*ting the Caribbean Renewable Energy Forum, CREF, a much wider reaching, international event that attracts a pantheon of diplomats, ministers, companies and investors in the arena renewable energy technology.
    Founding Chairman of CREF often reminds interviewers and his audiences that he “looks at things as a capita*list.” Indeed, those who are dedicated to transitioning the world to the use of renewable energy, thus reducing the carbon footprint, often place great emphasis on the economic opportunity it creates, along with jobs and very possible mega-profits. This is understandable, as the promise of profit may be the simplest way to detour investor funding away from oil exploration to more eco-friendly projects.

    Aruba’s government has asserted it sees renewable energy not only as a boon to the planet, but the path to sustai*nability, which also provides the added on value of diversifying the island’s economy and providing challenging employment in technological fields for his best and brightest.

    The official opening of CREF took place yesterday morning in the Westin Resort, with Aruba’s Prime Minister Mike Eman as keynote spea*ker, and Organization of American States, (OAS) Assistant Secretary General, Ambassador Albert Ramdin, providing the welcome remarks.

    Prime Minister Eman has been the driving force behind Aruba’s Green Energy policies and direction. A self-declared admirer of the teaches of so*ciologist Amitai Etzioni and the philosophy of communita*rianism, he directed his remarks to the human aspect of the renewable energy movement, urging attendees to always keep this purpose in sight.

    “Aruba has chosen a direction that comes quite naturally to a small country and a small community. That is finding a way to create a better quality of life, for each citizen, and a much more sustainable deve*lopment, which we translate to economic growth and well being for our citizens.”
    “It is crucial to have important partners when you take up such an enormous challenge. The fact that Aruba
    "Green Aruba" Conferences-ene1-268x300.jpg
    "Green Aruba" Conferences-ene2-300x115.jpg

    can say we have organizations such as TNO, The Carbon War Room, and institutions such as Harvard and TU Delft, really provides us great support for the vision we have articulated and set out for our island, so it may be totally sustainable by 2020.” He expressed his heartfelt thanks to the individuals from these institutions who have taken such an interest in Aruba and its goals.

    Citing the recent national elections, and his party and their policies experiencing a historic and sweeping majority at the polls, he thanked the Aruban population for taking to heart their slogan, “Good Work… much more to be done…In that combination, I believe we in this hall have come together. In the same sense that the world has made an effort lately, communities have come together to acknowledge we cannot continue on the same road and business as usual.”
    “All over, in islands like this, in cities and countries, conferences like this are taking place, initiatives are being taken, because the world understands that “business as usual” is not sustainable. Organizations have come together, and in some countries, important progress has been made…on a road to transfer our dependency on fossil fuel to alternative energies.”

    “In the acknowledgement… there is something more than only the choice for sustainable energy. On Aruba, we came to the conclusion that we need to choose; not only based on the way we could use our energy. We look back on our progress in the last 25 years and we see an island we can be very proud of. An island that use to have 200,000 tourists a year now has a million and a half. It used to have 2,000 hotel rooms, now it has 8,000. An island that used to have a GDP of four to five hundred million now has a GDP of over three billion.”

    “These are many large numbers and statistics that indicate an island that has moved forward to certain objectives. Those that look at hard numbers could boast that we have succeeded in the road we have chosen. However, in that same spirit, looking back from some years ago on this development, we have come to the conclusion that “business as usual” will not bring our community happiness, as we would hope.”

    “Larger numbers in hotel rooms, occupying more of our nature, making life more hectic for our citizen, but not creating a clear connection between economic growth and well being, is not a sustainable path. Definitely not a path that would lead to happiness for our society.

    In all this development, we have found that people have gotten jobs, but not the best jobs that they would like. They have found a way to take care of their families, but not in the best way. Sometimes, the hours at work have become much longer; weekends don’t exist and holidays are not what people knew in the past. So, we have given up a lot, as people, countries and communities, in order to achieve boastful numbers in GDP, economic growth, and impressive, monumental developments, such as the large hotels, 5- star hotels.

    But, when we look back at all this development, we must also be critical that an island like Aruba, which ranks #19 in population density, where the community looks at the beaches we are losing, the public spaces that are not adequate, the schools that are not 5-star. As a community, it demands reflection on the chosen path. This is not only a path chosen by Aruba, it is, perhaps, the tragedy of the Western Society. We have chosen a path in which we have looked very much at numbers and material wealth as the answer for happiness and well-being of our citizens. When you look back, all countries around the world see communities and people living in discontent although you have all these huge developments, people are still asking, “why did I lose my job? Why did I lose my pension? Why did I lose my house? Where were the institutions that were responsible for taking care of the jobs? Taking care of the opportunities for the future?”

    “There lies also the answer of the choice we have to make for the future,” continued the PM, “business as usual is no longer the answer for the future. I believe that in this choice for sustainability lies fundamental principles for a choice fo

    http://themorningnewsaruba.com/local...ality-of-life/
    Last edited by CK1; 10-11-2013 at 03:43 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CK1 View Post
    Prime Minister Mike Eman reminds delegates of the Caribbean Renewable Energy Forum that it is not only about the technology, but the “quality of life”


    On 11 Oct, 2013 At 12:53 AM | Categorized As Local | With 0 Comments

    Snip.....

    “There lies also the answer of the choice we have to make for the future,” continued the PM, “business as usual is no longer the answer for the future. I believe that in this choice for sustainability lies fundamental principles for a choice fo

    http://themorningnewsaruba.com/local...ality-of-life/
    The last part of this online article was cut off. For those interested, the rest of the article can be read here, on Page 11:

    http://issuu.com/themorningnews/docs...e067329ca34df9

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    CREF 2013: Energy ministers weigh in on climate change- when will


    On 12 Oct, 2013 At 09:18 AM | Categorized As Local | With 0 Comments

    "Green Aruba" Conferences-ene31.jpg

    Attending an informative event such as the Caribbean Renewal Energy Forum, CREF, is particularly interesting in light of a disturbing piece of news coming out of Texas less than three weeks prior to the opening ceremonies of CREF. A battle over the choice of science textbooks and curriculum is waging, because a number of climate change deniers have been appointed to the board to select the texts. They are insisting that the discussion of climate change be removed from seven proposed texts under conside*ration, maintaining “there is no evidence for a human influence on the carbon cycle,” and “there is no evidence on the effect of climate change on species diversity.”
    The National Academy of Sciences disagrees, but the rejection of textbooks by one school board can hinder its purchase and distribution among others.
    Those attending the CREF event on Aruba would certainly agree how counter-productive this attitude is towards educating the next generation on necessary habits for preserving the environment, and the threat that climate change poses. Much of the discussion at CREF is the practicalities of weaning away from oil as an energy source, simply for the economic dilemma and disaster continued oil dependence poses for Caribbean nations with limited resources. The change to renewable, “clean” energy sources is a pragmatic one to a great extent, with the added value of reducing the carbon footprint and hopefully, turning around the greenhouse effect that is melting polar ice caps and important glaciers.

    Island nations, not only in the Caribbean, have greater concerns regarding the steady rise in temperature of the atmosphere and have tangibly experienced the consequences. Rising sea levels are eroding beaches, one of their most important economic assets. Exceptionally high sea surface temperatures kill another asset: the reefs, which are also habitats to not only a tourist attraction, but a vital element of the locally harvested food supply. Those warmer waters also contribute to the larger, more intense summer storms that can do so much damage to pro*perty, cost lives, and disrupt economies.

    Three of the visiting officials were invited to the stage on Thursday morning, during the opening ceremonies of the CREF 2013 at the Westin Resort in Palm Beach. for a “Mi*nisters’ Debate.” They were Minister of Environment & Hou*sing, The Bahamas, Kenred Dorsett, Minister of Science, Technology, Energy and Mining, Jamaica, Phillip Paulwell and Saint Lucia’s Minister for the Public Ser*vice, Sustainable Development, Energy, Science and Technology Dr. James Fletcher. Moderating the debate was the President of the Carbon War Room and former President of Costa Rica, Jose Maria Figueres. Mr. Figueres described the participants has “having portfolios that are extremely relevant and strategic to this discussion.”

    A focal point of the discussion was the impact of increased and more efficient mining of gas on the process of switching over to “clean” renewable energy methods. Mr. Figueres noted “We live in a world that continues to send us contradictory signals with respect to the future we wish to move towards. On the one side, in 2011, the world spent $523 billion on fossil fuel subsidies; almost $2 billion a day. In 2012 the world spent $674 billion in finding and developing oil and gas alternatives. Only yesterday, the president of the OACD, said “We need to achieve zero emissions from fossil fuel sources by the second half of the 21st century-only 40 years away.”

    Gas is much cleaner bur*ning than coal, which is the cheapest and dirtiest, or oil, with its continually rising costs and volatile market, but still leaves a footprint. For many governments and administrators, the most immediate issue is keeping the cost of energy affordable for its businesses and citizenry; reducing emissions is a strong concern, but not the primary concern, just yet. Peter Boyd, COO of the Carbon War Room explained in his opening address that it takes 768 grams of CO2 to generate $1 of GDP in the world today. If we are to look at the trends of rising population and income centers, while attempting to keep climate stable at 102 degrees, (still pretty warm) the number of CO2 generated we need to achieve to stem the warming trend is 6 grams. “We need to act quickly and boldly,” he advised the CREF delegates.

    When asked if gas is changing the equation in their respective countries, all three ministers admitted that they expect LNG will likely be a factor they cannot ignore in keeping the cost of running a country and doing business affordable. Minister Dorsett stated, “The cost of kwh is .42 cents in The Bahamas, incredibly high. It is a burden on the back of businessmen and people. While we have been talking of reducing the cost of energy and employing renewables, no significant action has been taken. We believe that looking to natural gas can be game-changing for us, it is a cleaner fuel.”

    Jamaica’s Minister Paulwell conceded that his country also wrestles with a similar cost of kwh. He explained that a new government in Jamaica is attempting to implement policy, which “at the core, is based on diversification…We have been dependent on diesel for many years, using very old, antiquated equipment. We have decided to transform our base fuel to gas. A new and more efficient plant, capable of producing megawatts is now in process, which is expected to go online by the end of 2016.”

    Dr. Fletcher asserted that “gas energy balances the equation a little better. I wouldn’t say changes it completely, because I wouldn’t want gas to keep us from what should be our objective, which really, ideally, is a pathway that allows us to significantly reduce our carbon footprint, reducing our use of fossil fuels…gas does allow us to burn a “cleaner” fossil fuel, but it still, a recent recognized report tells us the effects of CO2 on climate change are worse and happening faster than was originally projected. I do not consider turning to gas as the answer to the problem, it is an immediate tool to reduce or cost of energy, but we should be looking at wind and solar technologies, with hydro; these are the methods to wean ourselves from fossil fuels and give us the energy independence we require.”
    CREF has welcomed dozens of highly placed officials from across the Caribbean attending the event, but their concerns over the continually rising cost of oil and the threat of climate change are based on very tangible, pragmatic evidence they witness and live with daily. Dr. Fletcher cited witnessing the loss of beachfront due to rising sea levels, and the subsequent loss of businesses that rely on that valuable asset, eroding not only the land, but the economy.

    For Caribbean islands, and many other such small nations across the globe, in the Pacific and Indian Oceans, climate change is not an unproven theory, it threatens their populations. Some have already made plans for evacuation procedures, and even concerned and observant individuals in Florida have reported the southern portions of the state will face this same dilemma within a few decades.


    Rosalie Klein

    "Green Aruba" Conferences-ene4-192x300.jpg

    "Green Aruba" Conferences-ene11-203x300.jpg

    "Green Aruba" Conferences-ene21-194x300.jpg

    http://themorningnewsaruba.com/local...nge-when-will/

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    Joe Biden’s Caribbean Energy Summit

    May 5th, 2016 | 2:03 pm

    United States Vice President Joe Biden chaired a major summit in Washington DC this week covering Caribbean energy.
    The US-Caribbean and Central America Energy Summit gathered Caribbean and Central America heads of government and energy ministers, along with multilaterals, private sector partners and others.


    The summit caps off the work of the US-Caribbean-Central America Energy Security Task Force, which US President Barack Obama chaired last year.


    It’s the second major Caribbean energy summit of its kind, following a similarly-Biden-led conference last year on energy security in the region.
    That was followed by Obama’s creation of a Task Force for Caribbean and Central American Energy Security last April, aimed at diminishing the vulnerability of small energy markets in the region to fluctuations in global energy markets.


    The US has been pushing for energy security in the Caribbean in recent years, with nearly $256 million committed by the Overseas Private Investment Corporation in the last two years for clean and renewable energy projects in the Caribbean and Central America.
    And there is certainly support for it in the Caribbean, which has some of the highest energy costs on earth.


    But it will be expensive: indeed, the task force pointed to estimates that to transform the Caribbean’s power systems alone, around $20 billion would be required over the next five to 10 years.


    “Working together, and with the support of the Inter-American Development Bank and the World Bank, the United States is confident that this region can become a model toward clean and efficient energy generation and use in the Western Hemisphere,” the government said in a statement. “Furthermore, The United States joins with other international and regional institutions, as well as public and private partners, to support efforts in the Caribbean and Central America to achieve a more secure energy future that supports economic growth and the environment and is based on the highest standards of regional cooperation, innovation, and investment.”


    For a small region, the Caribbean has been making significant strides in green energy, from Aruba’s landmark push for 100 percent green energy production to Jamaica’s strides in wind energy.

    http://caribjournal.com/2016/05/05/j...energy-summit/

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