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Thread: Infrastructure...roads, roundabouts, Watty Vos , Painted Markers

  1. #1
    Aruba since 1979
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    Andrea J.'s Avatar
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    Infrastructure...roads, roundabouts, Watty Vos , Painted Markers

    The leaps and bounds of infrastructure the past 15 or 20 years in Aruba is amazing...particularly these past 7 or 8 years.

    In particular I am speaking of the roundabouts/rotaries and the new highway from the airport heading south to Savaneta.

    No other Caribbean nation has made such strides.

    We have driven the highway 2x to visit friends in San Nic and Savaneta. It is amazing and works well.
    The people that travel this stretch are very happy. (Many if not most of the resort workers live in these areas south of the airport)
    Also too the tourists that head to and from that area are happy.

    The next phase is Watty Vos.
    I have no clue on the progress, but I will find out.
    Pour a cup of coffee and watch the video if you can. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DzlKfETLLfs

    I am trying not to be political......whether yellow, green, blue or whatever ...... I am just making observations as to how this American and spouse tourist appreciates how the infrastructure is progressing.

    My largest complaint is roadway markings....ya street signs and route numbers would be nice, but I am talking about the road markings....the painted lines, the arrows . There needs to be a couple of road crews whose sole purpose in keeping these things painted so that folks stay in their proper lanes .Especially but not limited to...the painted road markings in front of the Marriott near the roundabout, the intersection at Palm Bach rd Noord.


    Anyway, just some observations of this tourist.
    Last edited by Andrea J.; 11-09-2017 at 10:20 AM. Reason: typo due to iPhone. Thank you spelling police. :(

  2. #2
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    Its not hard to get around Aruba except I wish they would have actual street signs. If you go anywhere but the main roads, you can just drive in circles cause alot of the homes look the same (island living), and you have no idea if you've been there before, lol. I remember the first time in Aruba going to the alto vista chapel and we couldn't find our way out. thank goodness we pulled up to a lovely aruban woman who said follow me, i will get you to the main road and when I turn left, you go right. we'd still be there 7 years later, lol. so that is the only thing I have a problem with, street signs.

  3. #3
    Super Moderator Jacki's Avatar
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    the roundabouts have had a great impact on the speeds in those areas we've noticed. And that's a great thing!
    Jacki ~ loving Aruba from NJ

  4. #4
    Aruba since 1979
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    Gaby have you ever tried to enter and exit downtown between noon and 6

    imo it is hard to get around that section of aruba.
    Quote Originally Posted by gaby View Post
    Its not hard to get around Aruba except I wish they would have actual street signs. If you go anywhere but the main roads, you can just drive in circles cause alot of the homes look the same (island living), and you have no idea if you've been there before, lol. I remember the first time in Aruba going to the alto vista chapel and we couldn't find our way out. thank goodness we pulled up to a lovely aruban woman who said follow me, i will get you to the main road and when I turn left, you go right. we'd still be there 7 years later, lol. so that is the only thing I have a problem with, street signs.

  5. #5
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    oh, yes, andrea. we found an alternate way from our place to the airport (the back way and you end up at PriceSmart). well, there was so much traffic the back way, lol, that didn't work. I think the problem with downtown can be resolved quite easily. the problem is you have to stop to allow people to cross the street since there are no lights. if they had a light or built a pedestrian overpass, that would help. Vegas did it. the strip is alot longer than the area of downtown is but all they would need is one at beginning and one at the end with signs no crossing inbetween. then cars wouldn't have to stop to allow people to cross. alot of people won't go downtown because of the traffic (if you are driving). they resolved the parking meter situation by removing the boot and having free parking after 3. but its still too much of a hassle to deal with driving. I won't go downtown. Don't care about the meters, just too much of a hassle.

  6. #6
    Senior Member robin's Avatar
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    The first time we were there, we were told if we got lost, just follow the DiviDivi trees. They all point to the resort areas.


    Quote Originally Posted by gaby View Post
    Its not hard to get around Aruba except I wish they would have actual street signs. If you go anywhere but the main roads, you can just drive in circles cause alot of the homes look the same (island living), and you have no idea if you've been there before, lol. I remember the first time in Aruba going to the alto vista chapel and we couldn't find our way out. thank goodness we pulled up to a lovely aruban woman who said follow me, i will get you to the main road and when I turn left, you go right. we'd still be there 7 years later, lol. so that is the only thing I have a problem with, street signs.

  7. #7
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    For such a small island with very few natural resources, Aruba is a perfect example of the local authorities putting funds into the development and improvement of the local infrastructure. Their are other islands in the Caribbean where they have oil and natural gas, agriculture, tourism and offshore banking as their main industries( or a combination of them) and yet there are areas on some of these islands where the roads to some of the more rural areas is a dirt track, which can be extremely hard on commuters when they have to contend with it being muddy in the rainy season and dusty during the dry season.

    Apart from the construction of more walkovers in the areas of downtown(by the port) the high rise hotel area, and the highway between La Cabana/Tropicana and the Superfoods, the one other area I can say that the authorities on Aruba need to work on is their drainage system. I've seen pictures and videos of past instances with the most recent being back in 2016 when due to several hours of heavy rainfall a good many streets and roads on the island wound up under water. Even the airport was affected with the lower areas in the departure terminal flooded with rainwater. As someone who lives in a country where flooding is a constant occurrence during the rainy season, it can be a huge inconvenience and stressful especially if the water makes its way into your home or place of business. The joke in my country is that all it takes for the capital city to flood is for two vagrants to have a water fight, or for someone to drop a bottle of water on the ground and the next thing you know we're on our way to becoming the next city of Atlantis. Our flooding is often due to blocked water ways and in the case of the capital city, once the tide is high and the rainfall heavy their will be flooding.

    It was a bit odd seeing the Valero Gas Station out in Noord surrounded by water, with the main road completely under water. Hopefully the drainage issue will also be addressed. That and the need to put up more street signs and numbers on homes.

    Then again its not that difficult to get lost on the island, and even if you do, finding your way around turns into a discovery trip as you discover something new on Aruba.

  8. #8
    Aruba since 1979
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    Great thoughts Vallond!
    Quote Originally Posted by vallond View Post
    For such a small island with very few natural resources, Aruba is a perfect example of the local authorities putting funds into the development and improvement of the local infrastructure. Their are other islands in the Caribbean where they have oil and natural gas, agriculture, tourism and offshore banking as their main industries( or a combination of them) and yet there are areas on some of these islands where the roads to some of the more rural areas is a dirt track, which can be extremely hard on commuters when they have to contend with it being muddy in the rainy season and dusty during the dry season.

    Apart from the construction of more walkovers in the areas of downtown(by the port) the high rise hotel area, and the highway between La Cabana/Tropicana and the Superfoods, the one other area I can say that the authorities on Aruba need to work on is their drainage system. I've seen pictures and videos of past instances with the most recent being back in 2016 when due to several hours of heavy rainfall a good many streets and roads on the island wound up under water. Even the airport was affected with the lower areas in the departure terminal flooded with rainwater. As someone who lives in a country where flooding is a constant occurrence during the rainy season, it can be a huge inconvenience and stressful especially if the water makes its way into your home or place of business. The joke in my country is that all it takes for the capital city to flood is for two vagrants to have a water fight, or for someone to drop a bottle of water on the ground and the next thing you know we're on our way to becoming the next city of Atlantis. Our flooding is often due to blocked water ways and in the case of the capital city, once the tide is high and the rainfall heavy their will be flooding.

    It was a bit odd seeing the Valero Gas Station out in Noord surrounded by water, with the main road completely under water. Hopefully the drainage issue will also be addressed. That and the need to put up more street signs and numbers on homes.

    Then again its not that difficult to get lost on the island, and even if you do, finding your way around turns into a discovery trip as you discover something new on Aruba.

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