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Thread: Learning Dutch?

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    Junior Member FLSteff's Avatar
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    Learning Dutch?

    Are there other Americans on the forum that have learned the Dutch language? Although everyone that we have ever come across on the island knows English (with the exception of the asians that run some of the smaller grocery and convenience stores ) I've also been in the presence of a lot of locals that are communicating in Dutch and I obviously can't understand.

    Is it a hard language to learn? If I learned some German (as I have a lot of German friends) is it similar enough that I could understand or does it make more sense to try to pick up Dutch, or even some Papiamento instead? Any good resources that one can recommend to pick up some tips on the language? Being that the plan is to begin staying on the island extended periods of time I'm sure it would be helpful to learn. Thanks.

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    Aruba since 1979
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    http://www.rosettastone.com/learn-dutch

    check out rosetta stone

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    Junior Member FLSteff's Avatar
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    Wow, was hoping for something free instead LOL

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    check with your local school district (adult education) and your local public library.

    i am sure too that there are free things online.

    if i were to be in aruba for a long period of time, i would choose to learn papiamento, most if not all arubans speak papiamento.
    Quote Originally Posted by FLSteff View Post
    Wow, was hoping for something free instead LOL

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    Senior Member WaltVB's Avatar
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    I practice Dutch when we're on the island with the bartenders at Moomba. I've mastered the word "Heineken" so far (which is the brewers family name)... Just kidding.. I don't speak German, but it sounds similar to Dutch... maybe CK can chime in?

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    Senior Member Aruba4ever's Avatar
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    Dutch is a VERY hard language to pick up. Papiamento would be the language to learn as Andrea mentioned, its similar to spanish.

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    CK1
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    Quote Originally Posted by FLSteff View Post
    Are there other Americans on the forum that have learned the Dutch language? Although everyone that we have ever come across on the island knows English (with the exception of the asians that run some of the smaller grocery and convenience stores ) I've also been in the presence of a lot of locals that are communicating in Dutch and I obviously can't understand.

    Is it a hard language to learn? If I learned some German (as I have a lot of German friends) is it similar enough that I could understand or does it make more sense to try to pick up Dutch, or even some Papiamento instead? Any good resources that one can recommend to pick up some tips on the language? Being that the plan is to begin staying on the island extended periods of time I'm sure it would be helpful to learn. Thanks.

    Hi there!

    I'm fluent in German but it does not make sense for you to first learn German in order to understand Dutch, the languages are too different, only some words are similar and the construction of the sentence is similar.

    Here is an example:

    De verkiezing vindt dinsdagochtend plaats. (Dutch)

    Die Wahl findet am Dienstag morgen statt. (German)

    The election will take place on Tuesday morning.

    Dutch is the official language in Aruba.

    Papiamento (which is similar to Spanish and Portuguese) is mainly spoken in Aruba.

    My advice: Try to pick up both languages, if possible. Have two notebooks handy where you write down each new word and phrase you learn. It's a big advantage if you live in Aruba and have many friends there.

    Good thing that most people in Aruba speak English as well.

    What I noticed: When I picked up my rental car, the guy there spoke in English with me. Then, the phone rang and he spoke in Dutch with the person on the phone. One of the employees entered the office and the spoke in Papiamento with him. Then he turned to me and continued our conversation in English.

    Hope it does not get too confusing for you.

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    CK1
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    A while back we started this thread about Papiamento. It's just a few common words but it brings a smile to most Arubans when you greet them in their language.

    Papiamento ~ Which words do you already know?

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    Senior Member Aruba4ever's Avatar
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    I would struggle mightily trying to speak it but I CAN understand it reasonably well for someone who does not speak it. I have been asked on more than one occasion if I speak the language because I was able to follow conversations at the poker table....but only comment in English of course.

    Quote Originally Posted by CK1 View Post
    A while back we started this thread about Papiamento. It's just a few common words but it brings a smile to most Arubans when you greet them in their language.

    Papiamento ~ Which words do you already know?

  10. #10
    Aruba since 1979
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    http://www.aruba.com/the-island/language

    Papiamento: English:
    Bon Bini Welcome
    Bon tardi Good Afternoon
    Bon nochi Good evening
    Bon dia Good morning
    Pasa Bon dia! Have a nice day!
    Por fabor Please
    Ami Me
    Abo You
    Con ta bai? How are you?
    Mi ta bon I am fine
    Hopi bon Very good
    Mi nomber ta... My name is...
    Con jamabo? What is your name?
    Unda bo ta bai? Where are you going?
    Tur cos ta suave Everything is allright
    Di nada You are welcome
    Mi tin sed I am thirsty
    Mi tin hamber I am hungry
    Mi por a hanja un cerbes? Can I have a beer?
    Mi por a hanja un glas di awa? Can I have a glas of water?
    Con e tempo ta bai bira? What is the weather forecast?
    Ta bai hasi solo It will be sunny
    Awa ta jobe It's raining
    Con mi ta jega...? How do I get to ...(place)
    Unda e bus ta bai? Where is the bus going?
    Unda e ta? Where is it?
    Cuant'or tin? What time is it?
    Mi dushi My darling (sweety)
    Un sunchi A kiss
    Un braza A hug
    Mi amor My love
    Felis Happy
    Mi ta stimabo! I love you!
    Uno One
    Dos Two
    Tres Three
    Cuater Four
    Cinco Five
    Seis Six
    Shete Seven
    Ocho Eight
    Nuebe Nine
    Dies Ten

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