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Thread: Mosquitos and other little "biters"

  1. #1
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    Mosquitos and other little "biters"

    Hi all,

    We are heading over to Aruba for 2 weeks on 5th September and are wondering what to do about insect repellent? We have plug in things for the room etc and normally take some tropical strength (50% deet) anti-mossie lotion/spray but I' ve read somewhere that its not worth taking any with you as the mossies are immune to normal lotions??

    Can anyone advise me?

    Thanks

    Kay

    ********49 days to go ********

  2. #2
    Senior Member qlaval's Avatar
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    Frequently Asked Questions

    Q. What is dengue?
    A. Dengue (pronounced den' gee) is a disease caused by any one of four closely related dengue viruses (DENV 1, DENV 2, DENV 3, or DENV 4). The viruses are transmitted to humans by the bite of an infected mosquito. In the Western Hemisphere, the Aedes aegypti mosquito is the most important transmitter or vector of dengue viruses, although a 2001 outbreak in Hawaii was transmitted by Aedes albopictus. It is estimated that there are over 100 million cases of dengue worldwide each year.

    Q.What is dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF)?
    A.DHF is a more severe form of dengue infection. It can be fatal if unrecognized and not properly treated in a timely manner. DHF is caused by infection with the same viruses that cause dengue fever. With good medical management, mortality due to DHF can be less than 1%.

    Q.How are dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) spread?
    A. Dengue is transmitted to people by the bite of an Aedes mosquito that is infected with a dengue virus. The mosquito becomes infected with dengue virus when it bites a person who has dengue virus in their blood. The person can either have symptoms of dengue fever or DHF, or they may have no symptoms. After about one week, the mosquito can then transmit the virus while biting a healthy person. Dengue cannot be spread directly from person to person.

    Q.What are the symptoms of the disease?
    A. The principal symptoms of dengue fever are high fever, severe headache, severe pain behind the eyes, joint pain, muscle and bone pain, rash, and mild bleeding (e.g., nose or gums bleed, easy bruising). Generally, younger children and those with their first dengue infection have a milder illness than older children and adults.
    Dengue hemorrhagic fever is characterized by a fever that lasts from 2 to 7 days, with general signs and symptoms consistent with dengue fever. When the fever declines, symptoms including persistent vomiting, severe abdominal pain, and difficulty breathing, may develop. This marks the beginning of a 24- to 48-hour period when the smallest blood vessels (capillaries) become excessively permeable (“leaky”), allowing the fluid component to escape from the blood vessels into the peritoneum (causing ascites) and pleural cavity (leading to pleural effusions). This may lead to failure of the circulatory system and shock, followed by death, if circulatory failure is not corrected. In addition, the patient with DHF has a low platelet count and hemorrhagic manifestations, tendency to bruise easily or other types of skin hemorrhages, bleeding nose or gums, and possibly internal bleeding.

    Q.What is the treatment for dengue?
    A. There is no specific medication for treatment of a dengue infection. Persons who think they have dengue should use analgesics (pain relievers) with acetaminophen and avoid those containing aspirin. They should also rest, drink plenty of fluids, and consult a physician. If they feel worse (e.g., develop vomiting and severe abdominal pain) in the first 24 hours after the fever declines, they should go immediately to the hospital for evaluation.

    Q.Is there an effective treatment for dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF)?
    A. As with dengue fever, there is no specific medication for DHF. It can however be effectively treated by fluid replacement therapy if an early clinical diagnosis is made. DHF management frequently requires hospitalization. Physicians who suspect that a patient has DHF may want to consult the Dengue Branch at CDC, for more information.

    Q. Where can outbreaks of dengue occur?
    A.Outbreaks of dengue occur primarily in areas where Ae. aegypti (sometimes also Ae. albopictus) mosquitoes live. This includes most tropical urban areas of the world. Dengue viruses may be introduced into areas by travelers who become infected while visiting other areas of the tropics where dengue commonly exists.

    Q.What can be done to reduce the risk of acquiring dengue?
    A.There is no vaccine for preventing dengue. The best preventive measure for residents living in areas infested with Ae. aegypti is to eliminate the places where the mosquito lays her eggs, primarily artificial containers that hold water.
    Items that collect rainwater or to store water (for example, plastic containers, 55-gallon drums, buckets, or used automobile tires) should be covered or properly discarded. Pet and animal watering containers and vases with fresh flowers should be emptied and cleaned (to remove eggs) at least once a week. This will eliminate the mosquito eggs and larvae and reduce the number of mosquitoes present in these areas.
    Using air conditioning or window and door screens reduces the risk of mosquitoes coming indoors. Proper application of mosquito repellents containing 20% to 30% DEET as the active ingredient on exposed skin and clothing decreases the risk of being bitten by mosquitoes. The risk of dengue infection for international travelers appears to be small. There is increased risk if an epidemic is in progress or visitors are in housing without air conditioning or screened windows and doors.

    Q.How can we prevent epidemics of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF)?
    A.The emphasis for dengue prevention is on sustainable, community-based, integrated mosquito control, with limited reliance on insecticides (chemical larvicides, and adulticides). Preventing epidemic disease requires a coordinated community effort to increase awareness about dengue fever/DHF, how to recognize it, and how to control the mosquito that transmits it. Residents are responsible for keeping their yards and patios free of standing water where mosquitoes can be produced.



    But there's hope see this thread:
    Vaccine For Dengue Fever. There's hope...

  3. #3
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    What I should have said is that I know that there are mosquitos in Aruba and there is a risk of Dengue fever but not malaria but I was wondering if to take my own 50% deet protection or is there something local that can be bought that is more effective?

    Kay

  4. #4
    Aruba since 1979
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    Andrea J.'s Avatar
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    in aruba, the grocery stores and boticas and the small convenience stores sell OFF and similar products.
    we have had success using these repellants.
    we have also have had success using BOUNCE fabric softener sheets.......those although not as powerful as a DEET repellant, work ok.

  5. #5
    Senior Member danadog56's Avatar
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    last year we took plain old everyday bug spray and it seemed to work fine....I probably only used it the first few days and then seemed immune, although I did make a point of spraying my legs when we went out to dinner at a place we would be sitting outside though.....
    ARUBA....HOME AWAY FROM HOME

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    Fabric sheets ???

    Do you rub the sheets on your skin? I never heard of this . Are the mosquitos a problem now ? Didn't notice it last year in August? Thanks for all the info..

  7. #7
    Member minky1225's Avatar
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    I get eaten alive by mosquitos in NY during the summer months. I don't think I've been bit in Aruba once. I say, save room in your suitcase for sunscreen and buy a small bottle to bring with you just in case. I think the tradewinds are a little too strong for those creatures!

  8. #8
    Aruba since 1979
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    we have been bitten at dusk during outdoor dining.

    yes rub the fabric softener sheet on your exposed skin.
    it does NOT work as well as stuff with DEET but it is ok.

    the mosquitos are a problem especially when in a rainy period.......standing water = mosquitos.

    Quote Originally Posted by minky1225 View Post
    I get eaten alive by mosquitos in NY during the summer months. I don't think I've been bit in Aruba once. I say, save room in your suitcase for sunscreen and buy a small bottle to bring with you just in case. I think the tradewinds are a little too strong for those creatures!

  9. #9
    Senior Member qlaval's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sharpei65 View Post
    .... if to take my own 50% deet protection or is there something local that can be bought that is more effective?

    Kay
    Your homeproduct offer you the best protection there is, only cheaper...

  10. #10
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    we use the CVS version of Skin So Soft...the CVS version is easier to find. It's a skin oil not a repellant but the little critters don't seem to like it much. We used this on the kids when they were little since we didn't want to use deet and it works great. I have also used the bullfrog sunscreen/repellant combo and that too works just fine.

    gotta try that fabric softener thing though...I carry them in my suitcase anyway to keep the clothes smelling fresh, might as well rub one on me too, worse case I won't cling to myself.

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