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Thread: New Timeshare Beach Chair Taxes?

  1. #11
    Senior Member Traceyd14's Avatar
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    I was wondering if it was a cut and post from a timeshare newsletter or email to owners?

  2. #12
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    Message from BOD regarding additional fees, next will be save the turtle fee. They're choking the golden goose. Do your research.

  3. #13
    Super Moderator Jacki's Avatar
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    What resort is that from?
    Jacki ~ loving Aruba from NJ

  4. #14
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    patty please go back to your posting and site the source.

    thanks

    Quote Originally Posted by Pattyt View Post
    Message from BOD regarding additional fees, next will be save the turtle fee. They're choking the golden goose. Do your research.

  5. #15
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    To our Fellow Members:




    The Board of Directors wants to inform you about newly-imposed, Aruba Government beach policies that will significantly increase Costa Linda’s annual costs, The new rules will change how CLBR operates its beach front, as well as cause hefty, unbudgeted expenses.

    In addition to informing you about these changes, we want to report on what we, and the associations representing time shares and hotels, are doing to fight for changes in the new regulations. We’ll be posting this notice on the Members Home Page, but wanted to share it here first for our most active and engaged members.

    At the direction of the Board of Directors, CLBR lawyers have filed a formal objection against the Aruba Government’s recent fee assessment for a newly-required license to be able to place any lounge chairs (including our own) on the resort’s public beach front. The new policy is the latest in what we believe are a series of ill-conceived measures enacted by the government to close budget gaps by raising revenue from the island’s resorts and tourists.

    The new license policy, which requires all beach side hotels and timeshares in Aruba to obtain a license to place lounge chairs on the public beach in front of their establishments, is part of a set of new rules for use of Aruba beaches that were developed by the government during the past several years, and enacted by the governing agencies beginning in 2014. The new license policy requires all beach side hotels and time share resorts, water sports operators and chair/umbrella vendors to apply for a license to sell services to tourists, including the right to place lounge chairs on the beach -- which resorts have done freely for years without any such license. Costa Linda’s chaise lounges at and around the pool are not affected, since they are on lands we already lease from the government.

    Organizations representing the Aruba timeshare resorts, ATSA (Aruba Times Share Association) and hotels, AHATA (Aruba Hotels and Tourism Association) have retained counsel and are appealing various aspects of the new beach license requirements.

    Costa Linda only recently received the first invoice to pay for the right to place some 500 chairs on our beach front at what the government wants the annual cost to be -- $180,000 US dollars, retroactive to January 1, 2016. A new invoice for $180,000 US dollars will be issued for 2017.

    Costa Linda believes this unforeseen, unbudgeted and exorbitant expense has been unfairly and incorrectly calculated. The government asserts that the space taken up by each of our 500 or so beach chairs is more than 4 square meters per chair. ATSA asserts the actual space requirement is less than half of this measurement. Our appeal of this assessment contends that this basis for the calculation is way off, and that the rate per square meter is too high.

    It is a serious budgetary concern that Costa Linda is in the final quarter of the 2016 budget year, and that members have already approved the budget and 2% AMF increase for the 2017 budget year. The unbudgeted $360,000 cost for this license to put chairs on our beach is the equivalent of roughly a 2.5% hike over our current annual maintenance fees for each of the 2016 and 2017 budget years. Our attorneys have advised us that the best outcome from our objection would be the government agreeing to recalculate the fee structure to significantly reduce the license fee. In other words, the license and some sort of hefty, annual fee is here to stay.

    It’s important to note that any resort that did not apply for the license within the very short application time period offered last spring, as mandated by the new government law, is subject to having a government-issued vendor apply for license rights to provide chairs to resort occupants on the beach areas in front of their resorts. As many of you are aware, in addition to a food and beverage kiosk being built some 175 feet from CLBR’s northern border, water sports and chair/umbrella vendors are expected to be granted licenses to accommodate cruise ship tourists who will be transported to the public portion of Eagle Beach. If Costa Linda did not apply for a license, any Eagle Beach vendor could apply for and be granted a license to exclusively provide beach chairs to our owners on the public beach in front of our resort. The quality,quantity and availability of beach chairs provided to our members and guests, and, indeed, the beach area as a whole, would be controlled by local vendors. Obviously, it is in our members’ and the resort’s best interests to obtain our own license.

    Adding to our concern is another provision of the new license law that requires all license holders to completely remove all chairs each night from the public beach areas. Furthermore, the chairs cannot be stored on any portion of the beach. The stated reason for this new rule is so that local residents and tourists, whom the courts have ruled have the right to sit under any chikee on the public beach, will not be misled into thinking that the chikees are permanently reserved because there are chaise lounges under them. No, we are not making this up.The government wants to send a strong signal that resorts cannot make it appear as if all their chikees are reserved to discourage use by locals.

    Given current CLBR staffing levels and lack of adequate storage space for more than 500 chaise lounges and chairs, this requirement is logistically challenging, to say the least. The cost of hiring additional staff and the equipment needed to remove the chairs each night could be significant. It has been estimated that the daily placement and removal of these chairs would require such equipment as a flatbed truck, a tractor and a 5 X 8 X 20 trailer with 12-chair stacks that would have to be hauled back and forth in the early morning hours and early evening to the parking lot or an area in the northeast corner of the resort.

    Also, the wear and tear from stacking the lounge chairs would be tremendous, as it was when they were stacked on the beach at one time. We used to order 250 of them every 18 months or so and now we order about 80 replacement chairs a year. The total estimated additional budgetary impact of the current government regulation unchanged by our efforts could be between a $50-$60 per week increase over the current AMF or another odious daily surcharge. Neither option is one we would willingly choose, but we will have to
    find a way to cover these new expenses.

    With the appeal of the fee structure pending, the Board and Management will be seeking to meet and work with the government to find a reasonable solution to this particular moving and storage problem, as we also look for common ground on the assessment.

    This disappointing development will undoubtedly raise all sorts of questions and concerns throughout the Aruba tourist community. As always, your thoughts and comments are most welcome. Be assured that the Board and Management will do its level best to get the government to reconsider the fee structure and work with us to address our moving/storage problem. The Members Relations Committee will also do our best to answer questions and keep you informed about any progress made in influencing the outcome of these new requirements, as we did when we successfully sought to have the Eagle Beach kiosk moved farther from our property border.

    Stay Tuned

    The Members Relations Committee

    Regards,

    Luigi Heredia
    Resort Manager
    Costa Linda Beach Resort


    -----Original Message-----
    From: Vanessa Rasmussen [mailto:vanessa@ahata.com]
    Sent: Friday, October 28, 2016 11:57 AM
    To: Luigi Heredia
    Subject: Beach Chair Fees - Costa Linda

    Good morning Mr. Heredia,

    Please find below an inquiry from a timeshare owner from your property. If possible, I will appreciate if you share this information to the appropriate department for further follow up.

    Kind regards,

    Vanessa Rasmussen - Lew Jen Tai, Administrative Manager, Aruba Hotel & Tourism Association
    L.G. Smith Boulevard # 174, P.O.Box 542 Oranjestad - Aruba.
    Tel (011) (297) 582 2607 Fax (011) (297) 582 4202 www.ahata.com

    -----Original Message-----
    From:Sent: Friday, October 28, 2016 11:18 AM
    To: Vanessa Rasmussen <vanessa@ahata.com>
    Subject: Re: Beach Chair Fees

    That would be great if you could. Thank-you Vanessa

    Sent from my iPhone

    On Oct 28, 2016, at 9:05 AM, Vanessa Rasmussen <vanessa@ahata.com>
    wrote:
    Good morning Mr. Charles,
    Thank you for your email. Unfortunately, I do not have information
    about requirements for Costa Linda, the property is not a member of
    our association. However, if you would like I will be glad to forward
    your inquiry to the GM from Costa Linda for further follow up.
    Looking forward for your feedback,
    Vanessa Rasmussen - Lew Jen Tai, Administrative Manager, Aruba
    Hotel & Tourism Association
    L.G. Smith Boulevard # 174, P.O.Box 542 Oranjestad - Aruba.
    Tel (011) (297) 582 2607 Fax (011) (297) 582 4202 www.ahata.com
    -----Original Message-----
    Sent: Friday, October 28, 2016 6:56 AM
    Subject: Beach Chair Fees
    Hello Vanessa, Could you please update me on the upcoming beach chair
    fees or license required for Costa Linda as I am a multiple week owner.
    Best Regards, Charles
    Sent from my iPhone

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  6. #16
    Aruba since 1979
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    Andrea J.'s Avatar
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    NG (not good)

  7. #17
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    Oh boy! Didn't even think about other vendors buying the right to set up in front of anyplace that did not buy a licence. Hate to be looking at beach hawkers in front of us all day long, selling chairs and all kinds of stuff instead of looking at that beautiful turquoise water. Those vendor sheds with music blasting selling rafts, tubes, chairs umbrellas, ect. Good to hear that these resorts are working to solve this concern.
    Thanks for sharing,
    Sean and Susan

  8. #18
    Senior Member arubabob's Avatar
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    I am at a loss to understand why the Aruban government keeps coming up with these idiotic and sometimes costly ways to increase revenue. Instead of hiring 15 people and buying a ton of equipment to try and make a profit from parking fees, they could have simply added a buck or 2 to the cost of car tags. No fuss no po'ed tourists. If they want to get money for beach chairs, just add a buck to the departure tax. Why make things complicated?

  9. #19
    Senior Member AUA1989's Avatar
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    HI all. I haven't been on in a while, life gets in the way. But, this thread peaked my interest. Here are a couple thoughts.

    1. The affect on tourists will be an increase in the cost to visit. The properties will simply pass the costs on to guests, or there will be another tax on visitors; the beach tax perhaps?

    2. So, if the properties obtain a license, are they then permitted to dictate how their "area" is used and by "whom" since they are responsible for the chair placement and removal?? I then ask the Aruban government; what is it? are the beaches for public use or private use with a license?

    3. Also, I ask, have citizens of Aruba complained that complained about not having beach access? There are many beaches on Aruba. If I was a resident, why would I want to go to the beach with all the tourists anyhow?? Personally, I'd have quieter places to go. I understand we are tourists and I like seeing locals on the beach with us and we have wonderful conversations with them; however, are they demanding their beaches back and that tourists not enjoy them?

    I guess I don't understand.

    Without us tourists, what would the island sustain itself with? Do they feel there are too many tourists? Then why continue to allow hotel and timeshare growth. Why increase the number of rooms?? Again, what is it? Do they want us tourists, or do they not want us tourists.

  10. #20
    Aruba since 1979
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    Andrea J.'s Avatar
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    Very legitimate questions!
    Quote Originally Posted by AUA1989 View Post
    HI all. I haven't been on in a while, life gets in the way. But, this thread peaked my interest. Here are a couple thoughts.

    1. The affect on tourists will be an increase in the cost to visit. The properties will simply pass the costs on to guests, or there will be another tax on visitors; the beach tax perhaps?

    2. So, if the properties obtain a license, are they then permitted to dictate how their "area" is used and by "whom" since they are responsible for the chair placement and removal?? I then ask the Aruban government; what is it? are the beaches for public use or private use with a license?

    3. Also, I ask, have citizens of Aruba complained that complained about not having beach access? There are many beaches on Aruba. If I was a resident, why would I want to go to the beach with all the tourists anyhow?? Personally, I'd have quieter places to go. I understand we are tourists and I like seeing locals on the beach with us and we have wonderful conversations with them; however, are they demanding their beaches back and that tourists not enjoy them?

    I guess I don't understand.

    Without us tourists, what would the island sustain itself with? Do they feel there are too many tourists? Then why continue to allow hotel and timeshare growth. Why increase the number of rooms?? Again, what is it? Do they want us tourists, or do they not want us tourists.

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