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  1. #1
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    A serious question

    This question is asked with all due respect.

    We have friends involved in the catamaran/cruising business here. Every now and then they are asked to sprinkle the ashes of a deceased loved one. This got us to thinking.

    Is there any process that a person or family needs to go through in order to do this legally ( Other than of course dying)

    I am sorry if this seems a little macabre, but i do not know the answer and have heard a number of people ask this question.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Eagle Beach Boy's Avatar
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    Last season Family and Friends made a special afternoon of scattering the ashes of the coast of Eagle Beach. The wadded out into the water with the ashes and a drink to toast their family member and friend. Back on the beach more toasts were had.
    It was very touching.

    I do not know if a permit was needed.
    Eagle Beach Boy
    Ontario, Canada




  3. #3
    Senior Member Arubalisa's Avatar
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    Do not know about Aruba, but here in the U.S. in our state it is illegal. I would be interested to hear if it is indeed legal in Aruba.
    Last edited by Arubalisa; 08-26-2012 at 09:10 PM.

  4. #4
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    That too is my Request. to have my ashes spread off the back of a Cruise Ship in Aruba, with everyone drink in hand, My two favotite things, I would advise anyone to just try to carry out the wishes and Not ask permission. God Bless. Bill

  5. #5
    Aruba since 1979
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    Andrea J.'s Avatar
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    it is better to ask forgiveness than to ask permission ;-)

    better yet............john since you are "on island" now, would you be kind enough to contact the powers that be and ask if it is legal or if some type of permit is required and the procedure on how to obtain the permit?

    it would be nice if people could carry out a final request without being sneaky.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by aquaman
    This question is asked with all due respect.

    We have friends involved in the catamaran/cruising business here. Every now and then they are asked to sprinkle the ashes of a deceased loved one. This got us to thinking.

    Is there any process that a person or family needs to go through in order to do this legally ( Other than of course dying)

    I am sorry if this seems a little macabre, but i do not know the answer and have heard a number of people ask this question.
    Last edited by Andrea J.; 08-26-2012 at 11:23 PM.

  6. #6
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    Happy to do it

    I will ask and post what I find out. From what I understand this happens a lot. I am wondering if there is some formal recognition.


    Interesting huh>?

  7. #7
    Senior Member Traceyd14's Avatar
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    This question peaked my interest and I decided to do a little checking of my own about TSA regulations. I know this is not the initial question, but this info is good to know. Be careful when selecting the container/urn to transport the remains. This is copied directly from the TSA website:
    Transporting the Deceased

    Special Needs

    Traveling with Crematory Remains

    We understand how painful losing a loved one is, and we respect anyone traveling with crematory remains. Passengers are allowed to carry a crematory container as part of their carry-on luggage, but the container must pass through the X-ray machine. If the container is made of a material that generates an opaque image and prevents the Transportation Security Officer from clearly being able to see what is inside, then the container cannot be allowed through the security checkpoint.

    Out of respect to the deceased and their family and friends, under no circumstances will an officer open the container even if the passenger requests this be done. Documentation from the funeral home is not sufficient to carry a crematory container through security and onto a plane without screening.

    You may transport the urn as checked baggage provided that it is successfully screened. We will screen the urn for explosive materials/devices using a variety of techniques; if cleared, it will be permitted as checked baggage only.

    Some airlines do not allow cremated remains as checked baggage so please check with your air carrier before attempting to transport a crematory container in checked baggage.

    Crematory containers are made from many different types of materials, all with varying thickness. At present, we cannot state for certain whether your particular crematory container can successfully pass through an X-ray machine. However, we suggest that you purchase a temporary or permanent crematory container made of a lighter weight material such as wood or plastic that can be successfully X-rayed. We will continue to work with funeral home associations to provide additional guidance in the future
    Not sure when, but we will be back

  8. #8
    Aruba since 1979
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    Andrea J.'s Avatar
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    thanks for the info.

    i have a close friend that has given me instructions to spread his remains and it would involve me going on a plane.

    i hope i will not have to think of this for a looooooong time.

    Quote Originally Posted by Traceyd14 View Post
    This question peaked my interest and I decided to do a little checking of my own about TSA regulations. I know this is not the initial question, but this info is good to know. Be careful when selecting the container/urn to transport the remains. This is copied directly from the TSA website:
    Transporting the Deceased

    Special Needs

    Traveling with Crematory Remains

    We understand how painful losing a loved one is, and we respect anyone traveling with crematory remains. Passengers are allowed to carry a crematory container as part of their carry-on luggage, but the container must pass through the X-ray machine. If the container is made of a material that generates an opaque image and prevents the Transportation Security Officer from clearly being able to see what is inside, then the container cannot be allowed through the security checkpoint.

    Out of respect to the deceased and their family and friends, under no circumstances will an officer open the container even if the passenger requests this be done. Documentation from the funeral home is not sufficient to carry a crematory container through security and onto a plane without screening.

    You may transport the urn as checked baggage provided that it is successfully screened. We will screen the urn for explosive materials/devices using a variety of techniques; if cleared, it will be permitted as checked baggage only.

    Some airlines do not allow cremated remains as checked baggage so please check with your air carrier before attempting to transport a crematory container in checked baggage.

    Crematory containers are made from many different types of materials, all with varying thickness. At present, we cannot state for certain whether your particular crematory container can successfully pass through an X-ray machine. However, we suggest that you purchase a temporary or permanent crematory container made of a lighter weight material such as wood or plastic that can be successfully X-rayed. We will continue to work with funeral home associations to provide additional guidance in the future

  9. #9
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    It is especially good that someone has thrown this question out. It would have been very sorrowful and distressing if one were to be turned away by TSA or the airline because of lack of knowledge about rules and regulations. I, and, of course, it is just my opinion, but it also makes good sense to check with the officials in Aruba about whether there are restrictions to do so. Just my thoughts and opinions, as I said above.

    Have a wonderful day.

    Ed

  10. #10
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    Andrea

    I have contacted some folks to get the info on Aruba's requirements to bring a ceceased ashes in and also the correct procedure for scattering of the ashes. Will advise

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