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Thread: Some strong words by Ewald Biemans in "Morning News" re: "our fragile planet"

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    Some strong words by Ewald Biemans in "Morning News" re: "our fragile planet"

    http://themorningnewsaruba.com/trave...ustainability/

    Very interesting reading imo
    Kudos to Mr Biemans

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    Senior Member Arubalisa's Avatar
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    Pretty much sums it up...and I see no mention of wind turbines at Alto Vista

    “Our government departments are not enforcing some of the basics: illegal dumping, indiscriminate destruction of land and nature, mistreatment of animals, preservation of fauna, flora and reefs, the mangroves and the ocean. There are laws in place, but they are rarely enforced.”

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    yes i wondered why he did not mention it. such a hot topic. i would love to know his opinion of it.
    Quote Originally Posted by Arubalisa View Post
    “Our government departments are not enforcing some of the basics: illegal dumping, indiscriminate destruction of land and nature, mistreatment of animals, preservation of fauna, flora and reefs, the mangroves and the ocean. There are laws in place, but they are rarely enforced.”

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    Very good article! I agree with everything Mr. Biemans says.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Arubalisa View Post
    “Our government departments are not enforcing some of the basics: illegal dumping, indiscriminate destruction of land and nature, mistreatment of animals, preservation of fauna, flora and reefs, the mangroves and the ocean. There are laws in place, but they are rarely enforced.”
    Is this in Aruba or the US?
    /joking, for the most part

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    Here is an interesting article about overbuilding, tourism and it's impact.

    One stunning excerpt:

    An average golf course in a tropical country such as Thailand needs 1500kg of chemical fertilizers, pesticides and herbicides per year and uses as much water as 60,000 rural villagers.
    Source: Tourism Concern



    Tourism's Three Main Impact Areas

    http://www.unep.org/resourceefficiency/Business/SectoralActivities/Tourism/FactsandFiguresaboutTourism/ImpactsofTourism/EnvironmentalImpacts/TourismsThreeMainImpactAreas/tabid/78776/Default.aspx

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    Excerpt from Mr. Biermans' article:

    “My message today,” he began, “is there will be no tourism day to celebrate, if we do not take care of our fragile world. Our world is under siege, it is strained by global warming, overpopulation, and scarcities, one of them being in short supplies, which is water. It is a fact, water is life…to protect and preserve our water supply we need to protect the land that surround the oceans and rivers. I suggest we look at the complete picture.”

    Since 1960, Aruba's population has doubled. And tourism has increased to 1.5 Million visitors per year nowadays. Which means, more people, more buildings, more consumption, more waste etc, etc. However, Aruba herself remains the same in size.

    I think the most difficult part for Aruba, her citizen and her government is to find line and keep it in balance. There are many countries who once were favorite tourism destination but due to overbuild they destroyed their own economy, like areas in Spain or Mauritius or Greece. JMO.

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    This article had been posted in a different thread some time ago but I think it contains a lot of good info regarding this thread as well.

    Tourists to lend a hand with green projects in Aruba

    Tuesday, 18 June 2013 8:23 AM

    In September visitors to Aruba will be able to get hands-on with the Dutch Caribbean island's ground-breaking green initiatives with the annual reef care project. The Aruba Reef Care Project began in 1994 and was one of the island's most ambitious environmental projects to involve both tourists and residents. It now forms just one of a series of measures aimed at making Aruba a world-leading 'green' destination.


    Around 900 volunteers can join the reef care project, scheduled for September 21 this year. They will cover a 20-mile stretch of the southern coastline, including those in front of the main resort hotels, collecting any litter from beaches. Snorkellers and divers will also remove debris from the sea which could potentially threaten the island's diverse marine life.


    Supported by the Aruba Tourism Authority and many of the island’s hotels, the project also provides a valued opportunity for visitors to work with locals and help preserve Aruba's prized coral reefs.


    Aruba has adopted a policy of reducing its dependency on fossil fuel energy and CO2 emissions and has joined the Carbon War Room's Ten Island Challenge with other Caribbean islands aiming for a transition to 100% renewable energy.


    Aruba's Prime Minister, Mike Eman said: “Aruba has grown from 200,000 visitors a year to nearly 1.5 million and increased from 2,000 hotel rooms to 8,000. And all of this is a very small country, with a population density of 500 people per square kilometre - that is higher than New York. It was time for us as a nation to reassess where we should go in the next 25 years and it was clear to us we should focus on quality not quantity in expanding our economy, without making heavy demands on our infrastructure and natural resources”.


    In 2009 Aruba took a major step in the production of alternative energy with the opening of the Vader Piet Wind Park at the eastern end of the island. A second park is now planned for a site nearby.


    Sustainable projects to upgrade and improve the island's infrastructure include a 'Green Corridor' project, which will include cycle paths, sustainable lighting, landscaping and facilities for public transport and the US$350 million 'Bo Aruba' project to upgrade various sites and create pedestrian-friendly zones, linked to the recently-introduced tram system, running on renewable energy.


    A further landmark project is Aruba's Linear Park, which when complete will be the longest of its kind n the Caribbean. With the downtown section almost complete, the park will ultimately create an accessible, scenic link between the airport and the resorts along Palm Beach 10 miles to the north.

    For more information on environmental projects in Aruba, please visit www.aruba.com.

    http://www.iwantsun.co.uk/active-sun...jects-in-aruba

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    Senior Member Arubalisa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arubalisa View Post
    “Our government departments are not enforcing some of the basics: illegal dumping, indiscriminate destruction of land and nature, mistreatment of animals, preservation of fauna, flora and reefs, the mangroves and the ocean. There are laws in place, but they are rarely enforced.”
    I should add, that I agree with Mr. Biemans. The government can talk the talk but does not walk the walk.

    AND

    As beneficial as the reopening of the refinery would be for the local employment, if indeed locals were employed, what impact does THAT have on the ecology and the "greening" of Aruba?

    I have already stated my opinion on the wind turbines at Alto Vista but will again clarify that I am not a resident so have no say in what goes on.

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    i'd welcome the opportunity of residency

    i am on the fence re: the wind turbines. i don't have enough information to have an opinion.
    so many of the articles are in papiamento.
    and also as a non resident, i too have no say on the matter.

    Quote Originally Posted by Arubalisa View Post
    I should add, that I agree with Mr. Biemans. The government can talk the talk but does not walk the walk.

    AND

    As beneficial as the reopening of the refinery would be for the local employment, if indeed locals were employed, what impact does THAT have on the ecology and the "greening" of Aruba?

    I have already stated my opinion on the wind turbines at Alto Vista but will again clarify that I am not a resident so have no say in what goes on.

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