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Thread: Some strong words by Ewald Biemans in "Morning News" re: "our fragile planet"

  1. #11
    Senior Member danadog56's Avatar
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    Very interesting article.....especially about the tourism having an impact on keeping Aruba clean...no mention though of the volunteer project for cleaning the island that many tourists participate in.
    ARUBA....HOME AWAY FROM HOME

  2. #12
    Senior Member Arubalisa's Avatar
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    My issue with the turbines is the noise emitted from them and the proximity to the chapel at Alto Vista which will disturb the serenity of this religious location.

    In this video you can hear the wind, but you can also hear the constant hum of the turbines. We won't even go into the issues of broken turbines and the greater noise that they emit. What happens when the owners are slow or lax in repairing them?

    Are wind farms saving or killing us?

    Looking at this graphic, now I am wondering why not just place the turbines further northward on the coast? Oops, then it would then be too close to Tierra del Sol and the million dollar homes!


    <<stepping off my soap box now>>

  3. #13
    CK1
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    I just came across this video. It's regarding the "Green Corridor", the future plans going all the way to San Nicolas. I don't know... IMO, it does not even look like Aruba anymore.

    3D Rendering Aruba Green Corridor, from Airport to Post Chiquito.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=1VlZ2pwx-g8

  4. #14
    CK1
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    As Mr. Biemans said: It's a fragile Planet.
    This article seems worry-some to me.

    More immigrants needed for economic growth

    Monday, 12 August 2013 13:29
    RANJESTAD — To keep the economic growth at the same level for the long term Aruba is to attract more foreign workers, offer a flexible labor market – so more Aruban can also get started –, have a better climate of entrepreneurship and continue diversification of tourism to attract more vacationers from other countries.These recommendations are mentioned in the evaluation report on Aruba from the International Monetary Fund (IMF). As in other Caribbean countries there are developments that cause concern, IMF concludes, based on economic growth developments in the past twenty years. That growth is decreasing and with a view to the future IMF had charted factors that require an approach to maintain the economic growth for the long term. An important basic assumption is that the economy of Aruba is more vulnerable than that of other countries in the region. For instance, 80 percent of the economy runs on tourism. With that, according to World Travel & Tourism Council (report 2013) – Aruba is second worldwide as regards the tourism industry contributing to GNP. Economic developments in other countries, like the US (where 60 percent of Aruba’s tourists come from) therefore have a great impact on the economy here, considering the tourism and investments coming from those countries. Also the developments of the international oil price have direct consequences, for instance Valero closing down the refinery because it was unprofitable.

    Positive tourism
    IMF concludes there are several positive matters that could stimulate some growth. For example, Aruba succeeded in maintaining its strong competitive position compared to other tourist destinations, also during the crisis. This was due to the government continuing its endeavor to tap other markets such as South America and because of Aruba’s reputation as a luxurious travel destination. The revenues per hotel room therefore remained higher than the Caribbean average. Furthermore the high number of timeshare stays provided stability during the world crisis, according to IMF.
    The costs are also relatively low, especially the electricity rates being one of the lowest in the region. Despite a lack of specific information on the labor market IMF stated that the average wages (compared to the revenues per capita) and the shipping costs for import are also relatively low. As a result Aruba can compete rather well with the other Caribbean countries.

    Huge demand for immigrants
    However, to maintain the economic growth in the future, Aruba is to tackle several matters, IMF said. For example, there’s still room for more diversification of tourism, certainly because the majority of tourists still come from the US. According to IMF-research, there are indications that the tourism industry has reached a saturation point and the growth could decrease. The limited availability of land for tourism developments and the demand for foreign workers contribute to this.
    For that matter this demand for immigrants is due to a strong increase of the ageing population. IMF quoted three scenarios from the Central Statistical Office (CBS). The latter namely expects that over 20 percent of the population will be 65 years or older in 2030. The first scenario means that f45.025 immigrants are needed for an (actual) economic growth of around 1 percent, which is 37.4 percent of the population. For a growth of 1.6 percent (the current economic growth) Aruba will need 74.121 immigrants, which is approx. 48.3 percent of the total population. 88.741 Immigrants will be needed for an economic growth of 3 percent, which is slightly more than half (52.1 percent) of the population.
    With that IMF states that such high numbers of foreigner workers will put the already burdened housing market, infrastructure, medical care and education under more pressure. The government must therefore consider how Aruba can increase its productivity in other ways, such as improving the climate of entrepreneurship, increasing the labor participation, improving the competences of employees and technological progress. IMF remarks that the labor participation rate of Aruba, namely 64.7 percent, is low even compared to countries from the European Union (average 72.2 percent), while the EU indicates that low labor participation is one of the most important obstacles for its economic growth.

    http://www.amigoe.com/english/160446...conomic-growth
    Last edited by CK1; 10-16-2013 at 02:14 AM.

  5. #15
    Senior Member Arubalisa's Avatar
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    Thumbs down Don't believe EVERYTHING you read in the newspapers

    Quote Originally Posted by CK1 View Post
    according to World Travel & Tourism Council (report 2013) – Aruba is second worldwide as regards the tourism industry contributing to GNP. Economic developments in other countries, like the US (where 60 percent of Aruba’s tourists come from) therefore have a great impact on the economy here, considering the tourism and investments coming from those countries. Also the developments of the international oil price have direct consequences, for instance Valero closing down the refinery because it was unprofitable.
    Travel & Tourism Economic impact 2013 ArubA

    This "supposed" world ranking is "2nd" HOWEVER it is relative to size, not OVERALL as the article would lead you to believe.


    Most of the comparisons HERE are relative to


    "competing destinations as well as to the world average. The competing destinations selected are those that offer a similar tourism product and compete for tourists from the same set of origin markets. These tend to be, but are not exclusively, geographical neighbours."

  6. #16
    CK1
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arubalisa View Post
    Travel & Tourism Economic impact 2013 ArubA

    This "supposed" world ranking is "2nd" HOWEVER it is relative to size, not OVERALL as the article would lead you to believe.


    Most of the comparisons HERE are relative to


    "competing destinations as well as to the world average. The competing destinations selected are those that offer a similar tourism product and compete for tourists from the same set of origin markets. These tend to be, but are not exclusively, geographical neighbours."
    Thanks, that's some interesting info. I always appreciate additional input.

    The article I posted talks about GNP. I looked through the booklet (28 pages) which link you provided but could only see a reference to GDP (page 14).

    Did you see by chance a reference to GNP? Thanks in advance.

    I was also very impressed when I recently read that the current GDP is over three billion:

    We look back on our progress in the last 25 years and we see an island we can be very proud of. An island that use to have 200,000 tourists a year now has a million and a half. It used to have 2,000 hotel rooms, now it has 8,000. An island that used to have a GDP of four to five hundred million now has a GDP of over three billion.”
    "Green Aruba" Conferences

  7. #17
    Senior Member Arubalisa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CK1 View Post
    Did you see by chance a reference to GNP? Thanks in advance.
    Sorry, not sure of your question? The word GDP is mentioned 75 times in the paper. Below is part of how it is broken down. http://www.wttc.org/site_media/uploa.../aruba2013.pdf

    GDP: DIRECT CONTRIBUTION
    The direct contribution of Travel & Tourism to GDP was AWG 1,222.6mn (26.5% of total GDP) in 2012, and is forecast to rise by 4.4% in 2013, and to rise by 2.3% pa, from 2013-2023, to AWG 1,606.5mn in 2023 (in constant 2012 prices).

    DIRECT CONTRIBUTION
    The direct contribution of Travel & Tourism to GDP reflects the ‘internal’ spending on Travel & Tourism (total spending within a particular country on Travel & Tourism by residents and non-residents for business and leisure purposes) as well as government 'individual' spending - spending by government on Travel & Tourism services directly linked to visitors, such as cultural (eg museums) or recreational (eg national parks).


    GDP: TOTAL CONTRIBUTION
    The total contribution of Travel & Tourism to GDP was AWG 3,864.9mn (83.8% of GDP) in 2012, and is forecast to rise by 3.7% in 2013, and to rise by 2.6% pa to AWG 5,197.8mn in 2023.

    The total contribution of Travel & Tourism includes its ‘wider impacts’ (ie the indirect and induced impacts) on the economy. The ‘indirect’ contribution includes the GDP and jobs supported by:
    Travel & Tourism investment spending – an important aspect of both current and future activity that includes investment activity such as the purchase of new aircraft and construction of new hotels;
    Government 'collective' spending, which helps Travel & Tourism activity in many different ways as it is made on behalf of the ‘community at large’ – eg tourism marketing and promotion, aviation,
    administration, security services, resort area security services, resort area sanitation services, etc; Domestic purchases of goods and services by the sectors dealing directly with tourists - including, for example,
    purchases of food and cleaning services by hotels, of fuel and catering services by airlines, and IT services by travel agents.

  8. #18
    CK1
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    Thanks for the info. The GNP (Gross National Product) was mentioned in the Amigoe article I posted. The GDP (Gross Domestic Product) was mentioned in the booklet which link you provided. I was curious about the dollar amount of each one. But it's probably not a big difference.

    I agree that it sounds confusing:

    Aruba is second worldwide as regards the tourism industry contributing to GNP.

    What the writer probably wanted to say it that Aruba mainly depends on tourism. JMO.

    I came across this interesting list where Aruba is listed Rank 160/160/161:

    List of countries by GDP (nominal)

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of..._%28nominal%29

  9. #19
    Senior Member charles's Avatar
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    Andrea,
    Funny thing is that on Aruba, Ewald does not have "Strong words." He does however have very insightful words that are taken very seriously. Mr. Biemans is one of those men that has placed consequence on his actions. He is highly admired. I liked his statement very much..
    be well
    Charles
    THERE ARE PLACES TO SEE - STORIES TO TELL
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    be well
    charles

  10. #20
    CK1
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    Interesting article in Amigoe (in Dutch):

    http://www.amigoe.com/aruba/213757-g...green-corridor

    Here is a google translation:

    No environmental impact assessment Green Corridor PDF Print E-mail
    Monday, September 21, 2015 14:16

    ORANGE CITY - How much impact the construction of the Green Corridor is going to have on our nature and the environment is unknown. Prior to the start of the project worth 300 million florins, no environmental impact assessment (EIA) is made. While pressure is already built on the dual carriageway, the Aruba Sustainable Development Foundation (ASDF), commissioned by project giver Odinsa, recently launched an ecological study of a small part of the project.

    By our reporter

    Bobby Muscle

    In morning newspaper Bon Dia of August 14 published an article in which Infrastructure Minister Benny Sevinger seems to suggest that there is indeed an EIA report of the Green Corridor is present. In the article he states that into account in the construction of the dual carriageway account of the environment, as included in the MER. A Tjam Elton Liu, chairman of the new political party ABO (Aruba su Bienestar Organisacion) requires an understanding of this document. Following the article in Bon Dia, he wrote an official letter to the minister in which he invokes the Ordinance open government to obtain a copy of the report. But so far the party has received no response. "We are a legal follow-up procedure started," the party chairman says in conversation with Amigoe. "Of the entire Green Corridor procedure not true nut. If you are a government says to go green, you should ensure that respect for the environment is covered. Nowhere, it appears that they have made an environmental report. "He was therefore surprised at the article in Bon Dia. "There is under that article actually a report. Then we want to come to see that it is made public. That's what we deserve. "But in reality, says Liu A Tjam know that there is no EIA report exists. "The lot is bottle-fed, I know he's not there. It must be done with the hypocritical fuss, the whole parliament is misled and it is time for transparency. We are not talking about cat pee, but a project worth millions of florins. An EIA should be standard for this type of large projects, it is also the policy in Europe and America. Since 2003, such a study is indeed mandatory for the private sector, such as hotels. Why not for public projects? "

    No EIA

    Also Boekhoudt Gisbert, Director of Directorate for Nature and Environment (DNM), argues that no EIA exists. "We are totally in the beginning been involved in this plan and project, but have then heard nothing." And he's not happy. "Despite the fact that an EIA is not legally required, it certainly could have been a more elegant way. The fact that you no research into the environmental impact, is not going hand in hand with the green policy that you seek. These are projects that require more reporting, which should be looked at alternatives, aiming at such a low maximum impact and such a high potential return. What you encounter nature and the elements to be. "Swinda Dijkhoff of Public Works saved (DOW) and involved in the Green Corridor project, explains that the EIA actually does not exist. "A real EIA does not exist. But there is a social impact study made by foreign countries, whereby other aspects are examined. This also includes the environment. "When asked whether Amigoe may receive this document, she responds that the document is only available for perusal at DOW. However, she explains that project Odinsa now is engaged in manufacturing a variety EIA. "That is made by the ASDF which is located here in Aruba. Which should be ready in principle next month. "

    Not significant

    Henry ASDF de Cuba is charged with the investigation. He explains that no investigation into the entire route of the Green Corridor project, but aims solely to the construction of the bridge. "It's not really an EIS, but an ecological research that meets international standards. We are now working on an ecological plan, over the bridge of the Green Corridor. There must be a lot of mangrove to cut off. "When they do an assesment of the ecosystem. "We look at how much mangrove loss by the construction of the bridge and give advice to the project sponsor to cause as little damage as possible. On that basis, they must decide whether this part of the plan continues. "He said that their organization in 2012 even made a quick scan on the environmental impacts of the Green Corridor. "We had already identified the most sensitive places, such as Spanish Lagoon and internal waters of Savaneta. We gave then also be found in it important that the Government should make an EIA. But the government found that when not so important. We talked about a possible report, but it stayed in. "

    When asked why Grupo Odinsa decide to carry out an ecological survey, reacts to Cuba: "It was always the intention that they would investigate the most vulnerable places in the project." Grupo Odinsa this morning was not reachable for a to give response.

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