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  1. #11
    Senior Member lizzardo's Avatar
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    I'm not 100% sure it's good for the arubians (the people). A few have made money - but for the typical person living on the island - prices have gone up, the downtown area has been "vacated" due to the passeo mall and all the "stuff" being built by the high rises. The high rise area has too much traffic and is starting to look like Cancun. It has not been "regulated" so it looks nice - it's just a mash of buildings - the one building that is nice is the one next to the italian resturant that looks like little dutch buildings.

    The building of condos is totally out of control!! They are expensive and I don't think they are selling well in this economy so there will be a lot of empty units out there.

    I am also concerned about the amount of crime that is happening at the hotels and on the island all around.
    Last edited by Andrea J.; 01-02-2009 at 04:14 PM.
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  2. #12
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    Since 1980, and throughout the many changes, we still love going downtown in Oranjestad.
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    Good morning Love Aruba 99,

    Another bitterly cold morning here in Winnipeg, Canada. -25 Celsius, with a windchill of -40 celsius. Please don't ask me for it in Farenheit.

    Anyway, Scaramouche was a disco downtown back in the late 70's and into the 80's. Its logo was that of a pouty set of "lipsticked" female lips. Like mark a woman makes on a tissue just after she has applied her lipstick. As I said, it was a scandalous place in its day.

    I don't know what happened to Bali. All I know is, if you want Indonesian food now, you have to head over to Curacao.

    Happy New Year to you.


    Glenn

  3. #13
    Senior Member SanNic44's Avatar
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    I'm only going on 15 years visiting the island, and now I live there six months each year. Yes, there are tons of changes and not all of them what one might consider for the better.

    I'm inundated with people who criticize the increased number of hotels, shops, restaurants, and so forth. That said, I'd like to hear exactly how an island economy is supposed to support its citizens? In other words, if you are a native islander, how are you supposed to earn a living to achieve your life's goals? Let's play this scenario out a few turns. For example, say there are no more rooms built, what will happen? If demand goes up, prices will increase. Fine, until the customer goes somewhere else. If demand remains flat or declines, there is no opportunity for a native to increase his standard of living. The cost of things from the "outside" world (i.e. off the island) that the local person requires to live will continue to increase. He is trapped in a state of slow decline as his purchasing power is eroded.
    Thus, in order for visitors to enjoy their "version" of the island, the local person is "stuck" in a particular economic situation. How would you deal with this if someone came to your place and said basically, "This is the way we want it."?

    I've long advocated a diversification of the Aruban economy by settling the never-ending battles with the oil refinery and other businesses that either are presently on the island or would like to locate there. Bermuda hosts a significant number of insurance companies. Switzerland, as well as the islands of Jersey and Guernsey, support international banking activities. There is no reason why Aruba can not earn some of this business and reduce its dependency on tourism. These are just two examples; there are many more low-intensity industries that would lesson the pressure on development. They also provide greater opportunity in terms of personal development for individuals who are willing to invest in themselves and their island.

    Of course, it takes vision, hard work, good leadership, and brutal honesty to steer any political entity. Hopefully, Aruba's election in September will bring about these necessities.

    44
    Aruba's Novelist in Residence (sometimes)
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  4. #14
    Senior Member
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    Good morning,

    SanNic44, you make a lot of sense. I'd love to see Aruba's economy become more diversified.

    Things like off-shore banking, captive insurance companies, ship registration, off-shore company formation are the types of things I've been thinking of for years, not just for Aruba, but Curacao as well.

    These types of iniatives may require new legislation (either in Aruba itself or in The Netherlands) or amendments to exisying legislation, but I'm sure it could be done. Aruba certainly has the educated workforce needed to make those types of enterprises thrive. Now it needs the legal framework within which to develop those types businesses.

    Just look northward to The Cayman Islands and see what can be accomplished in those fields if everyone can get behind it.


    Glenn

  5. #15
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    SanNic44 and Glen:

    The topic; the suggestions; and the over-all discussion about the impact because of the building surge on the Island are highly informative and constructive. It is good to see people of good-will trying to use this forum to bring problems and possible solutions to our attention.

    Thank you.

  6. #16
    Senior Member SanNic44's Avatar
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    Glenn (and others),

    You are correct that it will take legislation and some other initiatives. One thing that many Arubans tell me is that young people leave the island in search of more diverse and rewarding opportunities. Retaining them will require a change in philosophy with regards to what can be accomplished on the island.

    I sincerely believe that Aruba has the potential to be a sort of "Dubai of the Caribbean," in the sense that the populace can enjoy a very high standard of living. The business types that you mentioned are a good start. Energy production will have to be reorganized as well, to insulate what is a small economy from price shocks that would disrupt any economy of this size. Most importantly, however, the education system will have to face the reality of more stringent standards. I appreciate the cultural realities surrounding Papiamento as a native language. Nonetheless, with globalization a non-stop train, Papiamento will not offer the advantages of English and/or Spanish. (A friend who recently visited China informed me how popular English has become there.) Certainly Aruba can retain Papiamento within the context of the local culture, but world business will skip the island if it does not perceive a workforce with strong English skills. That is to say beyond the basics. One need only look to India to see how successful this can be. In India, many people are fluent in their local dialect as well as English to a very advanced level. This gives them a distinct advantage over other nations looking to do business.

    Naturally, all of this is a mere suggestion. I want the best for the island but recognize that it is up to the Arubans to decide what is best for themselves. I would love to help.

    44
    Aruba's Novelist in Residence (sometimes)
    http://www.bentpage.wordpress.com/

  7. #17
    Senior Member rob o's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glenn View Post

    Another bitterly cold morning here in Winnipeg, Canada. -25 Celsius, with a windchill of -40 celsius. Please don't ask me for it in Farenheit.

    -40, Ouch.

    FYI.... minus 40 F is the same as minus 40 C....it's the one temperature at which Farenheit and Celsius are the same! And, it sounds nasty either way!
    Please contact via e-mail at arubarennowner@gmail.com



  8. #18
    Senior Member love aruba 99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by glenn View Post
    good morning love aruba 99,

    another bitterly cold morning here in winnipeg, canada. -25 celsius, with a windchill of -40 celsius. Please don't ask me for it in farenheit.

    Anyway, scaramouche was a disco downtown back in the late 70's and into the 80's. Its logo was that of a pouty set of "lipsticked" female lips. Like mark a woman makes on a tissue just after she has applied her lipstick. As i said, it was a scandalous place in its day.

    I don't know what happened to bali. All i know is, if you want indonesian food now, you have to head over to curacao.

    Happy new year to you.


    Glenn
    hello glenn, i do remember that disco , i have been in there a few times. That was a long time ago. I think the place burned down in the late 80's ??????????
    aruba lover 99


    45 th trip coming soon

  9. #19
    Senior Member love aruba 99's Avatar
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    Glenn, will you be in aruba for super bowl ????
    aruba lover 99


    45 th trip coming soon

  10. #20
    Junior Member waltham's Avatar
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    The Marriott is the perfect example of overbuilding. How many rooms in such a small area of beach? The main hotel is ok but with the addition of the surf club it is just out of control

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