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Thread: Why is this stuff not posted or in the English papers? ? ? ?

  1. #11
    Senior Member Arubalisa's Avatar
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    It all goes back to keeping yourself safe. Take the same precautions as you would at home. Do not let your guard down because you are in paradise.

    If you wouldn't walk in a dark area at night at home, why would you do it in Aruba? If you don't leave your doors locked at home, why would you do it in Aruba?

    I live in a pretty quiet semi-rural community here in the U.S. and we have jewelry store hold ups, bank hold ups, murders...
    criminals don't take time off from committing their deeds here in my small town, I wouldn't expect it to be any different in NJ, Puerto Rico, London or Aruba.

    I still tell people that if you wanted to travel and REALLY feel uncomfortable you should have gone to Panama during Noriega's reign. Soldiers with loaded rifles on every street corner in Colon! Makes a single girl traveling alone do some serious thinking.

    Aruba has a LONG way to go to become unsafe.

  2. #12
    Senior Member rob o's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arubalisa View Post
    It all goes back to keeping yourself safe. Take the same precautions as you would at home. Do not let your guard down because you are in paradise.

    If you wouldn't walk in a dark area at night at home, why would you do it in Aruba? If you don't leave your doors locked at home, why would you do it in Aruba?

    I live in a pretty quiet semi-rural community here in the U.S. and we have jewelry store hold ups, bank hold ups, murders...
    criminals don't take time off from committing their deeds here in my small town, I wouldn't expect it to be any different in NJ, Puerto Rico, London or Aruba.
    Aruba has a LONG way to go to become unsafe.
    i couldn't agree more. I feel quite safe in Aruba, always have, but having grown up in a city full of three-deckers and having gone to high school in the inner city I developed a sixth sense and am always alert, regardless of whether I'm in Aruba, Boston, or in my current rural neighborhood.

    As for illegals......in the US we encounter them every day. Heck, one cleans my office every morning. He's a nice, friendly, respectful, hard working guy, and that's all I need to know. Not my business, not my job to worry about it.

  3. #13
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    I hate the term " illegals ". These Are often people, like you and me, but not having the possibility of escaping poverty and crime around them. They seek a " better " life away from family and friends and culture. I am sure they miss this incredibly. If they work so hard and do not commit criminal offences, then why look down upon their efforts. Maybe a hearing before a court that could establish a temporary visa with a view to long term residency, assuming an ongoing clean record, might resolve many immigration issues.

    just my opinion. Thoughts from others?

    Aruba certainly has an interesting mix of cultures and people.

  4. #14
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    A MAJOR problem on the island, many of the young locals idolize american music, rap, gang activity, protecting
    their TURF etc.. silly but so very true.

    growing up we loved rock&roll, now RAP MUSIC IS THE NEW ROCK!!!

    remember how mtv videos displayed violence, the kids on the island love that attitude, believing that's how
    the strong survive. they don't want to work for minimum wage as contract employees, starting from the bottom.
    with minimum education they see their parents performing the same job until retirement, always struggling...
    they want quick cash, that comes with being aggressive.

    the entire world's teen and young adult has always followed american art and culture.
    I know my old neighborhood was 80% italian, now that role is reversed maybe less than 5% italian.
    we protected our turf back then, from the other side of our border.
    now thugs rule it..

    sorry for getting off topic, aruba, new york etc, crime will continue to soar, the youth of today are
    being raised with minimum family values, both parents work, unlike when mom was home..

  5. #15
    Senior Member Arubalisa's Avatar
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    just my opinion.

    As ugly as the term may be, they are illegally entering the country.

    Should we have compassion and show some empathy? Absolutely!

    Should we condone it? Absolutely. The laws of each nation, are exactly that and we all laws for a REASON.

    Here in the U.S. we hear all the time that we should not deport those who have entered our country with out the proper paperwork.

    What does that say to all of the people who went through the proper channels and entered the country properly through the system following the laws set forth? These are the same people

    I am friends with an Aruban native who entered the U.S. for her education and then upon completion of college and becoming a professional, was hired for employment here. It has cost her THOUSANDS of dollars in payments to lawyers and the U.S. government in order for her to have the privilege to work and live here.

    To her it is well worth it in that she would not have nearly as many opportunities in Aruba as she has here, but she did it legally.


    Quote Originally Posted by aquaman View Post
    I hate the term " illegals ". These Are often people, like you and me, but not having the possibility of escaping poverty and crime around them. They seek a " better " life away from family and friends and culture. I am sure they miss this incredibly. If they work so hard and do not commit criminal offences, then why look down upon their efforts. Maybe a hearing before a court that could establish a temporary visa with a view to long term residency, assuming an ongoing clean record, might resolve many immigration issues.

    just my opinion. Thoughts from others?

    Aruba certainly has an interesting mix of cultures and people.

  6. #16
    Senior Member arubabob's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by aquaman View Post
    I hate the term " illegals ". These Are often people, like you and me, but not having the possibility of escaping poverty and crime around them. They seek a " better " life away from family and friends and culture. I am sure they miss this incredibly. If they work so hard and do not commit criminal offences, then why look down upon their efforts. Maybe a hearing before a court that could establish a temporary visa with a view to long term residency, assuming an ongoing clean record, might resolve many immigration issues.

    just my opinion. Thoughts from others?

    Aruba certainly has an interesting mix of cultures and people.
    Hate to get into a political discussion here but as long as it is friendly I guess its OK. My thoughts stem from my grandparents coming here in the late 1890s. They had to apply for visas and wait their turn. Then came here and eventually became citizens. They were hardworking people too. The men came over first and got jobs then sent for the women. This took several years. There are still people on those waiting lists today that are hard working and looking to better their lives. They are doing it legally and should not get bumped because someone jumped the gun and came here illegally. That's my thoughts on it.

  7. #17
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    Soon we will have to call criminals who break into our houses- "house guests". If you come here illegal- it is what it is. I think Stan, was peeved about selective enforcement. We love Aruba and keep coming back. As for crime in Aruba, this sure is a touchy subject here. It touches all of us every where we go. I'm looking for coupons, dinner suggestions and happy news in those skinny free Aruba papers we see read on the beach. Is Stan, saying the Aruba news papers you pay for do not report crime in Aruba? We would love to know that.
    Sean and Susan

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