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View Full Version : Back from Aruba...yes, the "dissapointed" guy...



hx_guy
08-21-2008, 11:45 PM
Well...the other thread was closed, so I couldn't give an update of our trip there.

I saw a few people thought I posted what I did just to get a jolt reaction, but that really wasn't the case. ...it was just my feelings after I arrived on the island.In the end, we ended up loving the island and wanted to stay another week if it was possible.

The initial problem was the initial impression...we got in to Aruba around 3pm, checked in, etc...then decided to head to the beach around 4:30 or so. Well...no one had mentioned on here that the beach looks best in the mornings and around noon...as the sun starts to set, the water loses that aqua blue color, especially if there are a few clouds in the sky.
The next day, we went to the beach around 11am and it was magnificent, exactly what I had pictured in my head that it should look like. I posted a picture thread, but it got deleted because it was in the wrong forum...so I'll repost it in the Gallery section in a minute.

As I said, we ended up loving the trip...but I would be lying if I didn't say that it was still a bit of a surprised.
The online marketing, as well as people who talk about it, don't really ever go into talking about the island itself...the city, and the surrounding areas. If you've traveled the world a little, especially slightly poorer regions, then there won't be any shock to Aruba...but if it's your first time leaving the US, the grittiness of Aruba may come as a surprised. Personally, I enjoyed it, it reminded me a lot of my home country of Romania...but I completely did not expect it upon arrival...I was expecting a more exotic form of Hawaii and it wasn't anything like that.

Either way...great trip, great memories...and the proposal I planned was a success! :D

jessica33
08-22-2008, 08:08 AM
HI,
this is jessica,Aruba has an average rainfall of less than 20 inches a year. And with an average daytime temperature of 82° Fahrenheit,a location completely outside the hurricane belt, and the constant cooling influence of the trade winds, aruba is one of the most temperate island in the caribbean.
================================================== ==========
jessica

Colorado Drug Addiction (http://www.drugaddiction.net/colorado)

arubaness
08-22-2008, 08:31 AM
the grittiness of the island is limited to downtown and the outlying areas of the island - i believe you were staying at the renaissance? most tourists opt for the high rises on the palm beach section of the island where one would not notice the somewhat destitute conditions of the island. moreover, it seems that the local authorities have decided to forgo developing the downtown areas in lieu of developing palm beach (i.e. the new mall). but, as in any caribbean island or locale that is practically wholly dependent on the tourism industry, i find aruba to be at par with the others in regards to the local areas. with limited funds to begin with, one has to decide where the money will be best spent - on the local population or on the tourist attractions? in most cases, the latter will be the case as its a revenue driver.

but i'm glad you enjoyed your trip and congrats on your engagement. hope this doesn't turn you off on aruba!

Andrea J.
08-22-2008, 10:43 AM
i find your word "grittiness" confusing.
would you please explain to all of us that have been going to aruba for years and for all of us that have not been to aruba?

are you talking about the conucu area? the countryside where folks have small somewhat rustic/basic homes? "gritty?"

are you talking about the homes in the back of the downtown o'staad or san nicolas?

are you talking about the lack of lush tropical greens throughout the downtown and the countryside? "gritty?"

aruba is not a lush green island full of lush green vegetation.
it is a desert.
there is cactus, some/limited green stuff (mainly at the resorts where there is good irrigation)

run down areas? certainly, but in no way comparable to any other caribbean island with the exception of bonaire and maybe curacao.
heck the run down areas could not hold a candle to what in my opinion are horrid living conditions/project-like apartents right here in central maine. (who knew that central maine had such extreme poverty that some of these folks live in what i describe as low end tenements............we have been living here for 2 months)

what may be run down in "my or your eyes" may be the "ritz" in other's eyes.

the average aruban lives quite simply, cleanly and there is no/little unemployment.
arubans are well educated, especially those under age 60.

glad that your bit of a disappointment was able to be rectified on day 2 when you saw it from a whole different light.

we look forward to your "aruba story" in the correct thread and your lovely photos in the gallery.

we look forward to reading your opinions.
after all this is a board of opinions and bantering.

andrea j.

Edronenburg
08-22-2008, 11:13 AM
Well said, Andrea J. Without sounding offensive, you did clarify what Aruba really is and how the people live there. I, also, do not find it as grittiness in regard to the homes and downtown area. Of course, I wish congratulations on the acceptance of his proposal; and hope the correspondent returns and learns to love the Island, more, as we do.

JOANIE A
08-22-2008, 11:17 AM
I agree - i have been to other islands and to cancun where you cannot leave the hotel area without being in danger and without coming home with gi upset. I feel so safe and welcome in aruba and the restaurants are so good. However, when you arrive for the first time it does not look as tropical as these islands until you get to the eagle and palm beach area. Then it is so beautiful it wins your heart!!

Joanie a

Cosmo
08-22-2008, 01:29 PM
aruba gets better every time you visit.The more comfortable you become with the island, the more people you interact with, the more places you see, the more enjoyable the experience.

kal0721
08-22-2008, 02:11 PM
I have to agree my initial visit April/May 2005 I was really socked when we landed in Aruba. I was totally expecting pretty,lush so to speak. Once we got to our room I was again shocked at LaCabana's rooms, I was not expecting tile floors and the hotel feel.
However once we got to the pool and beach and ate our first meals at the wonderful restaurants I was hooked. The pool area, the waitresses seemed like they actually enjoyed doing their jobs, the beach and water oh my gosh, I could go on and on. With 22 days and counting down I can not wait to get back there. 4th trip in 4 years, and next years trip already being planned.

love aruba 99
08-22-2008, 02:38 PM
i find your word "grittiness" confusing.
would you please explain to all of us that have been going to aruba for years and for all of us that have not been to aruba?

are you talking about the conucu area? the countryside where folks have small somewhat rustic/basic homes? "gritty?"

are you talking about the homes in the back of the downtown o'staad or san nicolas?

are you talking about the lack of lush tropical greens throughout the downtown and the countryside? "gritty?"

aruba is not a lush green island full of lush green vegetation.
it is a desert.
there is cactus, some/limited green stuff (mainly at the resorts where there is good irrigation)

run down areas? certainly, but in no way comparable to any other caribbean island with the exception of bonaire and maybe curacao.
heck the run down areas could not hold a candle to what in my opinion are horrid living conditions/project-like apartents right here in central maine. (who knew that central maine had such extreme poverty that some of these folks live in what i describe as low end tenements............we have been living here for 2 months)

what may be run down in "my or your eyes" may be the "ritz" in other's eyes.

the average aruban lives quite simply, cleanly and there is no/little unemployment.
arubans are well educated, especially those under age 60.

glad that your bit of a disappointment was able to be rectified on day 2 when you saw it from a whole different light.

we look forward to your "aruba story" in the correct thread and your lovely photos in the gallery.

we look forward to reading your opinions.
after all this is a board of opinions and bantering.

andrea j.
WELL SAID ANDREA J. :thumb::thumb::thumb:

danadog56
08-22-2008, 03:26 PM
I suppose if you go to Aruba expecting Hawaii you would be disappointed...it is not a "tropical" paradise. A desert yes, as Andrea stated, most of the lust greenery is by the hotels where they are tended to everyday in order to look like that. When we stepped off the boat in Aruba the first time, I had no pre-conceptions about what to expect, just fell in love immediately.
The first thing that I noticed was the lack of "panhandling"...Lady buy this, Lady buy that, braid your hair...etc....I realize this is a way of life for many caribbean islands, but that kind of space-invading(for lack of a better word) is what makes me want to only go back to Aruba because you do not find that there.....mostly. I have been aproached parking the car by Charlie's Bar in SanNic, but otherwise it seems Arubans live in harmony. If you notice, a very expensive home right beside what we would not consider the best living conditions, but it is a way of life there....so if it works, they must be doing something right.
Anyway, just my 2cents.....love the island so much I would never consider any place else!!!!!!

arubaness
08-22-2008, 04:49 PM
sometimes i get the feeling that everyone that gangs up on the person that expresses a dissenting view from the consensus on this forum. kinda discourages people from being honest, no?

Andrea J.
08-22-2008, 06:19 PM
i take offense at your term "gangs up"this forum is looking for and providing information, objective folks giving honest and accurate views to the best of their ability.if we all agreed on everything, this would be a site that had no posts, no hits and no interest.i for one, could not figure what "grittiness" meant.nothing more, nothing less.it is our obligation as members to be kind, respectful and no name calling to any/all of the members.sometimes when there is an issue of nastiness, disrespect, trolling or crassness and wonder about it...........we should reread the forum rules, look in the mirror and say "say what can i do to make the forum a better more welcoming and embracing place?"i encourage all to rerread the forum rules.it is my job to make sure the forum posts flow freely with no one being ridiculed and all rules to be followed.i too encourage folks to make apologies when they unintentionally or intentionallytroll, be crass, crude and deliberately hurting feelings.am i making myself clear?andrea j.
sometimes i get the feeling that everyone that gangs up on the person that expresses a dissenting view from the consensus on this forum. kinda discourages people from being honest, no?

Andrea J.
08-22-2008, 06:23 PM
i have no idea why my previous post is so hard to readlet me repost iti take offense at your term gangs up.This forum is looking for and providing information, objective folks giving honest and accurate views to the best of their ability.If we all agreed on everything, this would be a site that had no posts, no hits and no interest.I for one, could not figure what grittiness meant.Nothiing more, nothing less.It is our obligation as members to be kind, respectful and no name calling to any/all of the members.Sometimes when there is an issue of nastiness, disrespect, trolling or crassness and wonder about it...........we should reread the forum rules, look in the mirror and say what can i do to make the forum a better more welcoming and embracing place?&I encourage all to rerread the forum rules.It is my job to make sure the forum posts flow freely with no one being ridiculed and all rules to be followed.I too encourage folks to make apologies when they unintentionally or intentionallytroll, be crass, crude and deliberately hurting feelings.am i making myself clear?andrea j.Quote:

arubaness
08-22-2008, 08:44 PM
no need to take offense at my using the term "gangs up" - i didnt mean it in a derogatory way. it was used to describe what everyone was seemingly doing to this poor person who posted the initial thread. i think it was safe to assume what he meant by grittiness - that the downtown area was rundown. everyone could've left it at that and informed him that the other areas are better. there was no need to be pinning him to the corner with such negative vibe by listing a litany of suggestive comments. the same was done to him before with his initial post - which was subsequently closed.

take it as it is and let people say what they feel. in the end this forum is a free flowing blog. no need to second guess or question a person's post. and if you have to ask then ensure that tone of your message is neutral.

danadog56
08-22-2008, 09:00 PM
Actually, no.....Nobody was discouraging an opinion. But when you say something negative you need to be able to justify your opinion. When I first became a member I made quite an impression by making some ridiculous remark because I thought the same thing.......All anybody asks when making comments is to explain your reasoning....Is that too much to ask ??

arubaness
08-22-2008, 09:30 PM
it is too much to ask when asked in an augmentative and intimidating manner. perhaps i'm reading too much into it, but my impression was such. the same also happened to me with one of my first post on this forum - it dealt with me saying that one would regret taking AA due to the long lines. right off the bat - the demanding questions for justification came my way.

in the long run - who would want to question the forum? and if no one is willing to present opposing views, what's the point of this forum???? - to say the same thing and have everyone be in unison?

Arubalisa
08-23-2008, 01:10 AM
A portion of the forum Rules (http://www.aruba.com/forum/misc.php?do=cfrules):

"Have respect for other opinions.

If you disagree with someone, do not attack them personally.

Try to make thoughtful comments about their opinion, perspective, assumptions, etc., but do not attack them personally.

Everyone has an opinion based on a number of different factors, like their own personal experiences, values, etc.

If someone disagrees with you, it is probably because they value one thing more than another.

Attacking them does nothing but create anger and resentment.

Discussing the values and perspective that underlies their opinions may increase your understanding and it may encourage them to see your perspective as well.

Personal attacks are the tools of someone who probably doesn’t have a very good point to make, or of someone who holds a belief that has no foundation in reasoned thought."

KK and Lj
08-23-2008, 01:45 PM
There are many opinions about Aruba. The post below is just one on a long thread from this site in the moving to Aruba column. Sounds "gritty" to me.
As to the "ganging up" that appears on this site, well it only takes a little time reading through the most active threads to see that it is most prevalent. JMO

"Aruba has Problems

We just returned, a few hours ago, from our vacation in Aruba, which we dedicated a large amount of time to looking at properties and land. We have been planning to buy a home or land and build a home.
We did not buy this time because we were really taken back with the condition of
Aruba this time! We have been going to Aruba for 25 years...and know the Island well. But this time I have to say...Aruba was filthy. We were shocked. Beer bottles and debris were all over the island. Even floating in the water at Baby beach. Everywhere. AND...the downtown area was dingy and SO MANY stores are empty! This trip, Aruba lost some of it's charm. We were very upset to see this. We heard the goverment ran out of money and this week, the entire Island is shutting down for a strike on Tuesday. Which means things will be even dirtier.
Tourism is there number 1 income. If they don't paint and spruce up the downtown areas, no one will want to shop there. We didn't.
The 'red light district' in San Nicolis advertises now and has an entire page in the daily local paper that is eye popping!!! They even supply transportation to the 'sexual experience' of your choice.
The condo and time share building has gotten out of control. People were complaining that they are sitting 6 " from each other on eagle beach! There are construction sites everywhere. eyesores. What happened to the quiant clean colorful Aruba?
And the worst....the homeless area...behind mainstreet has gotten huge. We could not believe the amount of men and women sitting against the buildings smoking crack IN PLAIN DAYLIGHT as you drove by. There had to be at least 25 of them along the block. And in the night, they hang out in the public parking lots by the casinos downtown and approach you asking for money as you walk to your car. very creepy. The police ignore them because they have no where to put them.
My bubble is shattered. Aruba has lost some of it's charm for us. And by the way...some of the homeowners we met were selling because they needed to get better healthcare. They said the healthcare is horrible! Especially emergency care. (and if you plan on retiring there, as we did, this is a big concern)
So we decided to sit back and watch what happens in the next couple years with the country before we buy. We hope it can handle all this developing, but with all this developing, it's not Aruba-one happy island anymore. It's one crowded island."
http://www.aruba.com/forum/f34/aruba-has-problems-30696/

abj
08-23-2008, 02:02 PM
The online marketing, as well as people who talk about it, don't really ever go into talking about the island itself...the city, and the surrounding areas. If you've traveled the world a little, especially slightly poorer regions, then there won't be any shock to Aruba...but if it's your first time leaving the US, the grittiness of Aruba may come as a surprised

guess you didn't look at the pics i posted. i took pics of everything. the good,bad and the ugly..lol.

i loved our trip. and want to go back. the beach and water is awesome, the park and all that offroad section is awesome. the black smoke pouring out the refinery in the backround of baby beach and the black smoke pouring out the stacks of the power plant is ugly. some of the sections of town are dumps and others are really nice.

Andrea J.
08-23-2008, 02:38 PM
Re: the black smoke and smokestacks.The industrial section does IMO ruin the picturesque beauty of the island.That being said, those smokestacks and refinery and the WEB plant provide employment\ income for the residents provides and a good infrastructure for all, including tourists.It is too bad that the industrial side of Aruba does spoil the view for many.Re: the litter Many of us have seen the litter along the main highway, broken bottles etc.It is an eyesore and like here in the USA, there are fines for littering. Aruba has made much headway and efforts in trash removal, recycling and public works road/litter clean up.Again for those of you that have negative remarks concerns, we encourage you to follow the rules and to speak up and post your concerns.For those of you that see nothing negative to report, we encourage you to follow the rules and to speak up and also to post.This world would be a sad or boring place if we all agreed wouldn’t it?Aruba is One Happy Island for many.Those that are unhappy visiting Aruba need to figure out what they can do to either make it more pleasing for themselves, or to find a vacation spot that is more suitable.Aruba is definitely not for everyone, nor should everyone expect that it is.As a reminder, this site is owned and sponsored by the Aruba Tourism Authority and they have set the rules and guidelines for this forum.No one is forced to post, or to read or to participate.All though, are required to respect each other and be courteous.This ATA site and the other Aruba Bulletin Boards all have similar guidelines.and i still cannot post to this site with proper script and spacing! Andrea
guess you didn't look at the pics i posted. i took pics of everything. the good,bad and the ugly..lol.

i loved our trip. and want to go back. the beach and water is awesome, the park and all that offroad section is awesome. the black smoke pouring out the refinery in the backround of baby beach and the black smoke pouring out the stacks of the power plant is ugly. some of the sections of town are dumps and others are really nice.

abj
08-23-2008, 02:53 PM
Re: the black smoke and smokestacks.The industrial section does IMO ruin the picturesque beauty of the island.That being said, those smokestacks and refinery and the WEB plant provide employment\ income for the residents provides and a good infrastructure for all, including tourists

i hear ya on that but those places need to be cleaned up. i work in a power plant here in NJ and if we put even a 1% of that black smoke out our stack we would be fined big time. they need to get some regulations there. and the dump area not sure if its a land fill or what but man is it a mess there. other places out by the drag strip are a mess too. on place i guess an asfault (sp?) company just had empty 55 gal. drums thrown all over the place. looked like an environmental nightmare.

like i said though. that stuff is minor to me. needs to be cleaned up in my opinion but will not keep me away. i want to get back as soon as i can afford. we had a great time there and want to see alot of stuff we didn't have time for.

i will say that everyone there was over the top nice to us. even the locals that we stopped to ask directions from. the drinking water is awesome. way better then the nj stuff we have here.

abj
08-23-2008, 02:59 PM
this is the one that shocked me the most.. just couldn't believe that on "baby" beach that the reifinery was right there. guess they had to put it somewhere though. i assume its on that side of the island because the winds will just blow the smoke out to sea? its in a way better place then the old one though. divi links golf course...lol. they also said that the container yard is moving sometime this year.

abj
08-23-2008, 03:05 PM
waking up and eating breakfast with this view though makes you forget about all that other stuff.





and this water that you can see rocks that clear under 15 feet of water was heaven for me. i loved it.

arubaness
08-23-2008, 03:07 PM
i'm glad that someone had the courage to speak up and agree with my assertions - thanks KK&Lj.

the problem here is not that the posts are rude or demeaning. it's the tone - thus, i guess it can be said that everyone is abiding by the forum's rules as we're not outright disparaging each other. however, the issue is the manner in which people respond to the dissenting views on this forum. the atmosphere is quite negative, accusatory, and discouraging in regards to posting different views. many people believe that they're being civil in how they respond to such comments when in fact they're tacitly bullying and suppressing the individual via the tone of their message.

notice how the person who originally posted this thread never wrote back?

my goal here is not to stir controversy but to tell everyone to chill out and let people speak their minds without having to take a defensive position.

Arubalisa
08-23-2008, 03:10 PM
Rogers Beach (http://www.arubabound.com/photos/bch/rodgers.htm)
http://www.arubabound.com/photos/bch/rogers_oilrefinery_sm.jpg (http://www.arubabound.com/photos/bch/rogers_oilrefinery.jpg) http://www.arubabound.com/photos/bch/rt_sm.jpg (http://www.arubabound.com/photos/bch/rt.jpg)

Baby Beach (http://www.arubabound.com/photos/bch/babybeach.htm)
http://www.arubabound.com/photos/bch/baby_beach_sm.jpg (http://www.arubabound.com/photos/bch/baby_beach.jpg) http://www.arubabound.com/photos/bch/baby_beachb_sm.jpg (http://www.arubabound.com/photos/bch/baby_beachb.jpg) http://www.arubabound.com/photos/bch/baby_beacha_sm.jpg (http://www.arubabound.com/photos/bch/baby_beacha.jpg)

Arubalisa
08-23-2008, 03:45 PM
That being said, those smokestacks and refinery and the WEB plant provide employment\ income for the residents provides and a good infrastructure for all, including tourists.

Some insight on the refinery and San Nicolas.

http://www.valero.com/AboutUs/Refineries/Aruba.htm (http://www.valero.com/AboutUs/Refineries/Aruba.htm)

"Fast Facts


More than $640 million has been invested in the refinery in the last five years to improve its safety, reliability and profitability
Total throughput capacity of 275,000 barrels per day (BPD) [crude oil closing price 8/23 = $114.78 per barrel = potential $31,564,500 per day gross]
Products include a high-yield of finished distillate products and intermediate feedstocks
Employs approximately 775 individuals" [island population approx. 120,000 (http://www.aruba.com/about/fastfacts.php)]
"Redevelopment of St. Nicholas
http://www.internationalreports.net/theamericas/aruba/2007/nicholas.html (http://www.internationalreports.net/theamericas/aruba/2007/nicholas.html)
InternationalReports.net / The Washington Times

Known as Aruba’s "second city" or "sunrise city", San Nicolas was once Aruba’s economic engine and center for commerce and industry.

The city has fallen on hard times in the last couple of decades and there is hope that the boom in tourism and construction on the island will bring new prosperity and economic development.

San Nicolas is awash in contrasts. Once a bustling hub of economic activity, the city is now relatively dormant. Home to some of Aruba’s most beautiful beaches, San Nicolas receives far fewer tourist dollars.

Containing some of Aruba’s richest cultural heritage, the city is eclipsed by the bright lights and big city atmosphere on the tourist strip at the other end of the island. There are those that lament that it has been Aruba’s "forgotten city."

From 1925-1970s San Nicolas was home to the Lagos Oil Refinery. Those were the heydays. The refinery employed between 8,000 - 10,000 workers, nearly everyone on the island. In fact, Aruba had to import workers just to fill the demand for the labor the refinery generated.

San Nicolas became a company town and the refinery practically controlled the island. It had its own hospital, supermarkets, restaurants, movie theatres, tennis courts and golf course. For the Americans that came to work for the company, it was like being at home. There were American high schools with American teachers and American doctors worked in the hospital.

No one could imagine that after 60 years, the refinery would close and take with it a way of life, but that is exactly what happened.

The Lagos Refinery was designed to process heavy Venezuelan crude, which it purchased from the country at a special price. When Venezuela joined OPEC, it had to adhere to OPEC policy and had to raise its prices. In 1986, shortly after Aruba had achieved independent status, when a better price for the crude could not be negotiated, the refinery closed and left thousands without jobs.

Its closure created an economic depression on the island that was only slowly alleviated by the development of tourism. Unfortunately, San Nicolas has not benefited significantly from the tourism boom.

Just outside of San Nicholas are some of Aruba's most beautiful beaches. This one is a favorate for wind surfers.

Today, 20 years later, Valero Energy owns the refinery and has recently invested over $300 million in the facility. While the refinery once again is providing jobs, there are far fewer available.

The city is predominately black and viewed as the poor part of the island. Residents of San Nicolas are passionate about their home and are determined to see it succeed again.

Hubert Redhead is managing director of Tebolo Consultancy and president of the San Nicolas Business Association. When he left to study aircraft engineering and business in the Netherlands, the city was booming. When he came back several years later, the refinery had closed and things had changed.

He asked himself, "What can I do to better the quality of life and economic aspect on this side of the island?."

As president of the business association, he and others are trying new ways to stimulate economic development. The association conducts surveys and research to help its members and offers different trainings to increase the productivity of its businesses.

One of the association’s most important roles is as liaison between business and government. The message the association is sending is one of economic diversification.

Redhead emphasized that, with the closure of the refinery, Aruba’s economic focus switched to tourism. "Now, everyone is dependent on tourism. Tourism is people and people are unpredictable. We will struggle as an island if only focus on tourism. In economic policy, you have to diversify. "

Toko Winklaar, director of the Media Group, a small media conglomerate, sees enormous potential for San Nicolas.

"San Nicolas is a place where people can still see how Aruba used to be," said Winklaar. "It still has that Caribbean taste, that rustic feel. We need to show our diversity, in our tourism products. We have beaches, caves, rock climbing, and off roading in San Nicolas.

"We need to take more care of San Nicolas, Aruba is more than just the strip," he added.

Winklaar pointed out that San Nicolas’ rich history would lend itself to a different kind of tourist experience, one steeped in history and culture. One that would not require building more high rise hotels, but something more suited to a cultural experience.

He pointed out the attributes of Baby Beach and that the explosive waves on that side of the island could make it an ideal place to develop specialty tourism in surfing.

There is no doubt that Aruba can continue to build on its tourism product in San Nicolas. There are those that would like to even expand tourism offerings to replace the refinery with a cruise ship port. While that is unlikely to happen, at least the dialogue is creating attention for San Nicolas and the hope that change is in the air."

W.E.B. Aruba N.V http://www.webaruba.com/ (http://www.webaruba.com/)
"Aruba has a lot to offer: like plenty of sun, beautiful beaches, and friendly people. However, Aruba does not have a natural source of fresh water and rainfall is limited. Aruba’s population of 100,000 inhabitants plus the more than 700,000 tourists who visit annually, have access to sufficient drinking water which in quality and taste can compete with any other water in the world, including bottled water!

For more than 70 years, WATER- EN ENERGIEBEDRIJF ARUBA N.V. (WEB) has been responsible for the production of Aruba’s drinking water and power and has done an outstanding job.

This remarkable achievement is the result of years of dedicated effort by W.E.B. Aruba N.V.’s employees, management, and predecessors. W.E.B. Aruba N.V. generates electricity, and produces drinking and industrial water through an integrated process utilizing steam. The cornerstone of this process is the desalination of seawater, which Aruba has in abundance from the Caribbean Sea.

Nowadays, W.E.B. Aruba N.V. is a modern company ready to face Aruba’s needs and the challenges of the third millennium with state of the art facilities and equipment, latest technological advances, highly qualified personnel, and continuous improvement of service, efficiency, and reliability of its operations.

During the last decade, W.E.B. Aruba N.V. has invested approximately 250 million dollars to upgrade, modernize, and expand its water production and electricity generation by installing additional boilers, a desalination unit, modern automated control systems, and a new turbine generator. An integral part of these advancements has been the development of its personnel."

Container port relocation and expansion create opportunities for growth and economic diversification (http://www.internationalreports.net/theamericas/aruba/2007/port.html) InternationalReports.net / The Washington Times
"Tourists increasingly want unique experiences when they travel; they do not want to see the same thing everywhere. That is where Aruba has a distinct advantage, after all there aren’t many places that you can see a beach with cactus, interesting geologic formations, ancient caves with paintings and go hiking on a mountain all in one day.

"We want to maintain our "Arubaness". As a port, we are focusing on alternative types of tour operators. We want to expose visitors to our flora and fauna, historical sites and museums and give tourists a taste of the island," said Boekhoudt."

abj
08-23-2008, 04:43 PM
"Fast Facts
More than $640 million has been invested in the refinery in the last five years to improve its safety, reliability and profitability
Total throughput capacity of 275,000 barrels per day (BPD) [crude oil closing price 8/23 = $114.78 per barrel = potential $31,564,500 per day gross]
Products include a high-yield of finished distillate products and intermediate feedstocks
Employs approximately 775 individuals" [island population approx. 120,000]

now it needs to put money into cleaning up what comes from those stacks.. :)

Arubalisa
08-23-2008, 05:33 PM
now it needs to put money into cleaning up what comes from those stacks.. :)
:( Valero had the refinery up for sale. They do not want to put up the money for modernizations. Petrobas was a potential buyer, I do not know if the sale has been finalized. The refinery processed heavy sour crude and it is much more expensive and less readily available. :( :(

abj
08-23-2008, 06:34 PM
They do not want to put up the money for modernizations.

i know all about that.. we have been sold three times in the last 8 years. no one puts money into the place so they can make the most when they sell. it sucks.

kooky98
08-24-2008, 12:01 AM
ABJ,
Where are you staying that is so close to the water? Is that dock by your room? (the first picture-view at breakfast)

I do remember my first time going to Aruba 11 years ago, I knew it was going to be a desert, but I was still surprised by it. But I love it, I always describe it as a small part of Arizona dropped off in the Carribbian. Beautiful and rugged and dramatic.

Unfortunatly, I did notice this time, that there were a few more homeless people, and some homes were more run down than they used to be....I felt sad about that...because I used to go around Aruba without a care in the world..., (I mean within normal reason) now, I felt a little scared after dark in some areas. I felt bad about the new mall takeing away so much business from downtown. That area used to thrive, and looked rather bleek now. It used to be that if you wanted to shop, you had to go either to the few hotel stores or downtown, and during the day as they are closed at night. Now, that the mall is open at night, people don't have to go down town at all. They don't have to miss the beach time, they can go to the new mall and shops at night...I thought it was very convienant (sp), The area is so nice, but, I think if downtown wants to keep up, they will have to start staying open at night...and hopefully the revitalization will help.

I love Aruba, I can't wait to go back, When I am gone, I feel a certain home sickness...but, I do think things have been changing to much and to fast. I think it is hard for such a small Island to keep up with so many changes....The thing I have loved and I'm sure many others have loved is the peacful, quietness...I think the High rise area has lost much of that old charm...but I don't stay in either of the hotel areas, so, I still get the old rustic feel, but I will admit to enjoying the ammenities of the hotel areas... I guess, I enjoy it all!

I hope I can book something, for sooner not later!;)
Elise

arubaness
08-24-2008, 12:49 AM
the refinery has not been put on the block yet by valero. they've officially stated that its on their list to sell but nothing yet. i doubt petrobras or other drillers out there would want to own a refinery in the current market as refining margins are closed to negative right now. also, if past sales are any indication, refineries are fetching low multplies in the market - thus, valero will probably not sell into it. besides, the aruba plant is a sizable operation processing some 300k barrels a day.

barkip
03-07-2012, 04:38 PM
It's 2012 and nothing even close to what I've read was in 2008. I finally found place to spend most of my vacation time and most likely retire there, at least 6 months out of the year...:)

Andrea J.
03-07-2012, 06:09 PM
excellent about your hopes/plan to retire to aruba.
welcome to the forum.

i wonder why you are replying to a 4 yr old thread?

i had to go back to the first post of this thread to find where "grittiness" came into play ;)
It's 2012 and nothing even close to what I've read was in 2008. I finally found place to spend most of my vacation time and most likely retire there, at least 6 months out of the year...:)

rapp110
03-12-2012, 12:45 PM
I realize I am late in joining this post. But, all I have to say is I love Aruba. From the time I leave the island I am counting down to my next trip. We plan on buying a home there eventually and plan to spend 3 to 6 months in Aruba.

During our first trip to Aruba 9 years ago we got to know a few locals who worked at the Mill. WE fell in love with the people of Aruba. They are the happiest people I have ever met, they are extremely hard working and are so inviting. They told us about the beaches and places that the locals like.

WE have never been appoached by anyone asking for money, or trying to sell us anything. The serenity and peace I feel when I am in Aruba is like heaven on earth.

In six years when we retire we hope to spend 3 months a year maybe 6 months in Aruba. It may not be the greeenst or most lush of the islands. I tell everyone it is a big sandbar. But it is heaven to me.