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Aruba Nights Island Guide
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Thread: Tropical Storm?

  1. #31
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    People really need to get it out of their minds that Aruba is outside of the hurricane belt . This has no meteorological standing. Sure, Aruba has never been hit by a hurricane since record keeping began, but Curaçao and Bonaire have. There's no reason why Aruba couldn't be hit. It's just that the conditions needed for it are super rare(not impossible).

    As far as this event goes there's nothing to be concerned. It's a rain event, one we typically experience every few years or so anyways. People get excited because it's a (potential) tropical storm. Aruba building codes are actually very strong, so unless it gets up to category 2 hurricane and above, there's little reason to worry.

    Ones that should worry are those in the specific neighborhoods that flood easily and hotels like casa del mar for if the sea gets really rough.
    Last edited by Arawak; 06-29-2022 at 12:09 PM.
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  2. #32
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    Thanks again Arawak for setting things straight. I sold my place In Florida for Aruba so I guess my chances of being hit by
    hurricanes are at least much less in Aruba.
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  3. #33
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    Arawak, How do Aruba's building codes protect buildings located on the beach from possible erosion? We live in Florida and have seen buildings washed into the ocean from hours of waves pounding the shoreline. Curious about how Aruba's codes protect beach erosion. Thanks for any updates.
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  4. #34
    Super Moderator WaltVB's Avatar
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    For those of us here in the states, you can follow along on the various webcams.

    Aruba Webcams, Live Channels and Live Event
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  5. #35
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    Here is link to Casa del Mar webcam. Weather Channel showed this in their afternoon update.

    https://www.casadelmar-aruba.com/web...hare-aruba.php
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  6. #36
    Senior Member schexc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by flpctc View Post
    So we just bought our condo in April and one of the reasons we picked Aruba? Yup minimal chances of any real storm since it's out of the
    hurricane belt! We haven't been down there since April and plan to go back in Oct. if I can get flights that don't drain what's now left of my 401k!!
    Let's hope it is nothing more than a little more rain for everyone who is there and all those heading there.
    As a reviewer of Aruba said a number of years ago..."it never rains in Aruba, until it does"

    I'm sure there will be some areas of localized flooding. It doesn't take that much rain on the island to do so.






    OUR COUPLE'S RETREAT. THE PEARL CONDO HOTEL AT EAGLE BEACH. CONDO ACCOMMODATES TWO ADULTS. YOU MUST REQUEST UNIT #8. https://photos.app.goo.gl/lRquP1F4VtxyZhR42 RENTING DIRECTLY http://www.pearlarubacondos.com/. SEND PM BEFORE BOOKING FOR REFERRAL .
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  7. #37
    Senior Member schexc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WaltVB View Post
    For those of us here in the states, you can follow along on the various webcams.

    Aruba Webcams, Live Channels and Live Event
    Been watching the webcams... It's the closest that we can get.

    Hope act1966 can chime in.






    OUR COUPLE'S RETREAT. THE PEARL CONDO HOTEL AT EAGLE BEACH. CONDO ACCOMMODATES TWO ADULTS. YOU MUST REQUEST UNIT #8. https://photos.app.goo.gl/lRquP1F4VtxyZhR42 RENTING DIRECTLY http://www.pearlarubacondos.com/. SEND PM BEFORE BOOKING FOR REFERRAL .
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  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arawak View Post
    People really need to get it out of their minds that Aruba is outside of the hurricane belt . This has no meteorological standing. Sure, Aruba has never been hit by a hurricane since record keeping began, but Curaçao and Bonaire have. There's no reason why Aruba couldn't be hit. It's just that the conditions needed for it are super rare(not impossible).

    As far as this event goes there's nothing to be concerned. It's a rain event, one we typically experience every few years or so anyways. People get excited because it's a (potential) tropical storm. Aruba building codes are actually very strong, so unless it gets up to category 2 hurricane and above, there's little reason to worry.

    Ones that should worry are those in the specific neighborhoods that flood easily and hotels like casa del mar for if the sea gets really rough.
    This is what is posted on the Aruba.com website. Pay particular attention to the last sentence.:
    ”Aruba consistently ranks as having the least amount of rainfall in the Southern Caribbean. The calming trade winds will keep you cool in the pleasant 82-degree weather. Thanks to our location outside the hurricane belt, visitors can expect reliably great weather throughout the year.”

    I guess that’s where visitors get the impression that Aruba is outside the hurricane belt.

    We are all aware that nothing is 100% sure. That’s why today’s weather event is such a big deal to many. This is a rarity for the island and folks will weather the storm.
    With the government placing Aruba under Code Red, I’m confident that they are doing everything possible to keep people safe.

    And remember - after rain there is sunshine.
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  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tuckahoe View Post
    This is what is posted on the Aruba.com website. Pay particular attention to the last sentence.:
    ”Aruba consistently ranks as having the least amount of rainfall in the Southern Caribbean. The calming trade winds will keep you cool in the pleasant 82-degree weather. Thanks to our location outside the hurricane belt, visitors can expect reliably great weather throughout the year.”

    I guess that’s where visitors get the impression that Aruba is outside the hurricane belt.
    Outside of hurricane belt and "one happy island" are all tourism based slogans. There's nothing inherently true about them. Aruba.com is the tourism website so they will "stretch the truth" to make Aruba more attractive for visitors. In other words: marketing. Same thing with "rock stacking" being falsely advertised as an "Aruban tradition" when it never was.
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  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by frzummo87 View Post
    Arawak, How do Aruba's building codes protect buildings located on the beach from possible erosion? We live in Florida and have seen buildings washed into the ocean from hours of waves pounding the shoreline. Curious about how Aruba's codes protect beach erosion. Thanks for any updates.
    Aruba dsn't really have many homes that are built right on the beach like I see elsewhere. Hotels and buildings built around wetlands and beaches have very deep foundations. Foundations in Aruba in general are really strong. So for a building to get washed away like that would require a very long lasting beating.

    Another thing to keep in mind is that 99.9% of hurricanes pass to the north of the island. So, the roughest seas are always on the northern shore where there are no structures. Then, when those storms have already gone passed Aruba, the trailing "tail" (Rabo) as we call it, may affect the southern shore. But by then you are only getting the remnants and not the full force.
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