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View Full Version : Traveling with a minor who is not our child



katherine
01-30-2010, 04:58 PM
We will be bringing our 16 year old niece along with us to Aruba this Spring Break along with our own 3 children. Do we need any documentation other than her passport to bring her into the country? Any info appreciated!!

Shelly
01-30-2010, 05:12 PM
2 years ago our daughter (then 16) went to Bermuda with a friends family. We had to give the parents a letter that both my husband and I signed allowing them to take her out of the country and it had to be notarized. Not sure if it's the same in Aruba, but it wouldn't hurt. And make sure you take a copy of her family insurance card in case she needs medical care

SuperBunches
01-30-2010, 05:37 PM
I always make the parents write a letter before I take kids on vacation. I even do it for my nieces that have a different last name. You never know if one of the airline employees might want proof that you are allowed to take someone else's child to another country. Immigration could also be an issue. I have never had it happen, but it could really put a damper on your vacation if it did. Included in the letter, I have them give me permission to make medical decisions on behalf of the child in case of emergency.

We always have our kids bring friends with us on vacation so that they have somebody to hang out with. So every year I gather all of the passports, photocopies of the passports, all of the confirmations for car rental, outings, etc, the letters from the parents and any other important trip-related documents and put them into a folder. I impress upon the whole family and the friends of the importance of the folder and how our vacation could be ruined! if the folder gets lost. Guess who left the folder on the floor at Hadicurari??? :doh: Our room at the Surf Club wasn't ready last year on arrival so we went next door for lunch. After all of my lecturing about the importance of the folder, I left it sitting on the floor! Thank goodness they picked it up and put it safely away. It was actually a few hours before I even realized it was gone. I took quite a bit of ribbing for that one!

cindyo
01-30-2010, 07:19 PM
Notarized note, written by parents, and signed by you. Also include any health care info notarized...not kidding here..

corona
01-30-2010, 07:32 PM
Yes, as others have said, you need notarized approval from both parents to take a minor child out of the country. We've taken our minor niece and a friend of my son's to Aruba, and was not asked to show the document. However, a few years ago, my husband (and our son's father) was taking our son to Canada, and I just happened to go into the airport with them, thankfully. The woman at the counter needed my approval for his dad to take him. She said had I not been there, and since my husband didn't have a letter stating my approval for him to take him to Canada, they wouldn't have let them leave. It's to cut down on child custody abductions. We also had the parents send medical/dental authorization letters in case the child got sick or injured.

Arubalisa
01-30-2010, 07:35 PM
http://www.ilrg.com/forms/auth-foreigntravel.html (http://www.ilrg.com/forms/auth-foreigntravel.html) AUTHORIZATION FOR FOREIGN TRAVEL WITH MINOR

http://www.ilrg.com/forms/auth-minormed.html (http://www.ilrg.com/forms/auth-minormed.html) AUTHORIZATION FOR MINOR'S MEDICAL TREATMENT<<-- pretty sure this is a "must have"

Andrea J.
01-30-2010, 09:11 PM
AND..............have the minor child have in his or her possession a valid master card or visa card in his/her name (of course the parent's account)

if medical care is necessary there will be NO issues of being "paid back" if the minor child's parent's account is paying.

Arubalisa
01-30-2010, 10:57 PM
AND..............have the minor child have in his or her possession a valid master card or visa card in his/her name (of course the parent's account)

if medical care is necessary there will be NO issues of being "paid back" if the minor child's parent's account is paying.

Great idea. :) Our dd has a pre-paid credit card which she will be bringing on a couple of upcoming class trips. God forbid she needed additional funds put on to the card, with a few key strokes on the computer, we can add funds instantly to the card.

rob o
01-31-2010, 06:46 AM
I know this thread was started to discuss taking someone else's child, but Corona's point is very important for all to see and think about because it is not as obvious.

If one parent is taking their own child out of the country, have a notarized note from the other.....even if you're happily married and not divorced. With child abductions being a valid concern, thiis may be needed.

Our niece and nephew sometimes fly separately to Aruba, and they always prepare a note for the one with their kids.

If the child is not yours....be sure to have a note giving you permission to make decisions regarding medical care....not just a health card.

TomFrederick
01-31-2010, 11:25 AM
>>>> "her family insurance card in case she needs medical care"
------ Don't think Aruba will take any of the U.S. Medical Plans for payment if medical care is needed. The Aruban Hospital will take a charge card. Get good documentation as some medical plans will pay you what they normally pay. Mine even paid me for treatment on a cruise ship.

ksw5487
01-31-2010, 10:47 PM
I am taking my teenage girls, do I need to have a letter signed by my husband?

Andrea J.
02-01-2010, 04:16 AM
nope (the short answer)

now if you had said x husband than the answer would be yes

the notarized letter and stuff needed is for minors that are not your kids, relatives that are minors traveling without their parents and kids traveling with 1 parent when there is divorce and custody instructions.

ex: no permission needed if they are YOUR minor children and there is no divorce/custody arrangement.

http://www.ilrg.com/forms/auth-minormed.html (lisa provided this link on pg one of this thread)

andrea


I am taking my teenage girls, do I need to have a letter signed by my husband?

corona
02-01-2010, 08:21 AM
nope (the short answer)

now if you had said x husband than the answer would be yes

the notarized letter and stuff needed is for minors that are not your kids, relatives that are minors traveling without their parents and kids traveling with 1 parent when there is divorce and custody instructions.

ex: no permission needed if they are YOUR minor children and there is no divorce/custody arrangement.

http://www.ilrg.com/forms/auth-minormed.html (lisa provided this link on pg one of this thread)

andrea

Andrea, are you sure about that? It was my husband, not ex-husband, and father to our son, who was taking him to Canada about four or five years ago. He was stopped at the ticket counter, and asked for proof that I approved him taking our son out of the country. There was no custody or other issues whatsoever, and I'm not sure how an airline would know that there was anyway, unless they were alerted by the other parent. As I said, I happened to go inside with him to say good bye, and the ticket agent told us point blank had I not been there, and without notarized authorization, they would not have let our son leave the country with his dad. Maybe the agent was wrong, but personally, I'd get the form signed and notorized by the other parent for smoother sailing.

Arubalisa
02-01-2010, 10:43 AM
US Customs & Border Protection FAQ (https://help.cbp.gov/cgi-bin/customs.cfg/php/enduser/std_adp.php?p_faqid=268&p_created=1043364937&p_sid=QuDuPsTj&p_accessibility=0&p_redirect=&p_srch=1&p_lva=74&p_sp=cF9zcmNoPTEmcF9zb3J0X2J5PSZwX2dyaWRzb3J0PSZwX 3Jvd19jbnQ9OSw5JnBfcHJvZHM9JnBfY2F0cz0mcF9wdj0mcF9 jdj0mcF9wYWdlPTEmcF9zZWFyY2hfdGV4dD1wYXJlbnQ!&p_li=&p_topview=1)

"Question:
If a child (under the age of 18) is traveling with only one parent or someone who is not a parent or legal guardian, what paperwork should the adult have to indicate permission or legal authority to have that child in their care?

Answer:
Due to the increasing incidents of child abductions in disputed custody cases and as possible victims of child pornography, Customs and Border Protection (CBP) strongly recommends that unless the child is accompanied by both parents, the adult have a note from the child's other parent (or, in the case of a child traveling with grandparents, uncles or aunts, sisters or brothers, or friends, a note signed by both parents) stating "I acknowledge that my wife/husband/etc. is traveling out of the country with my son/daughter. He/She/They has my permission to do so."

CBP also suggests that this note be notarized.

While CBP may not ask to see this documentation, if we do ask, and you do not have it, you may be detained until the circumstances of the child traveling without both parents can be fully assessed. If there is no second parent with legal claims to the child (deceased, sole custody, etc.) any other relevant paperwork, such as a court decision, birth certificate naming only one parent, death certificate, etc., would be useful.

Adults traveling with children should also be aware that, while the U.S. does not require this documentation, many other countries do; failure to produce notarized permission letters and/or birth certificates could result in travelers being refused entry (Canada has very strict requirements in this regard). ..."

Northwest Airlines nwa.com - Travel Planner - Tips - Children (http://74.125.47.132/search?q=cache:Z3SLPHAWU2UJ:www.nwa.com/services/reqtraveldocs.html+one+parent+traveling+with+child&cd=4&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=us)


"Many countries require documentary evidence of the traveling adults' relationship to the child and permission of the parent(s) or legal guardian before they will allow the child to cross the border. Single parents, grandparents, or guardians traveling with children often need proof of custody or notarized letters from the other parent authorizing travel. These requirements are in addition to passport or proof of citizenship requirements.

Minor traveling with one parent: If a minor child is traveling with only one parent, the absent parent is recommended to provide notarized consent. If only one parent has legal custody, that parent should be prepared to provide a court order of child custody to airlines and international authorities.
Minor traveling alone: If a minor child is traveling alone or in someone else's company, both parents (or the sole, documented custodial parent) are recommended to provide notarized consent.
Minor with a different last name: If a child traveling has a different last name from the mother and/or father, the parents should be prepared to provide evidence to airlines and official authorities, such as a birth certificate or adoption decree, to prove that they are the parents.
Minor has one deceased parent: If one parent is deceased, a death certificate should be readily provided by the other parent.
Minor has one parent: If the birth certificate shows that the minor only has one parent, it will be sufficient to hold only a notarized copy of the birth certificate."
When we traveled internationally with our then foster child, we were required by law to have a court order from the judge (it was up to him, not the parent since she was in the care of the state) overseeing her case. Traveling domestically as well. We were never asked to see the court order but it gave us comfort knowing that should parentage ever be questioned, we were fully within our legal rights. Better safe than sorry.

corona
02-01-2010, 12:18 PM
Thanks for the info from the source, Lisa. From your post, I now understand why the ticket agent made such a fuss about my husband taking our son to Canada.



(Canada has very strict requirements in this regard). ..."

rob o
02-01-2010, 12:19 PM
Better safe than sorry.

Lisa....though I knew about most everything in your post, I thank you, on behalf of the Forum, for your valuable posting. It affects many who might have had no idea that this documentation is importent.

Arubalisa
02-01-2010, 12:40 PM
You are very welcome. :) The more research I did there more info there was out there.

Suffice to say that each country has different requirements. I cannot specifically find those for Aruba, but imo, if you have a notorized authorization from the parent for travel as well as insurance info AND notorized permission for a child's care in an emergency you should be fine.


If in doubt you can always phone your airline. As with even passports discrepancies as they do sometimes occur with "names", it is they who ultimately determine whether or not you even step foot on the airplane.

Let google be your friend. :)

Andrea J.
02-02-2010, 06:46 AM
good info lisa thanks for doing some hunting for it.
there is a woman here from milton, ma with her 2 sons both preschoolers.
yesterday after reading the additional postings on this subject i asked her what she encountered traveling without her husband and her sons. she told me that all she had as far as documentation was the 3 passports, (hers and the boys).
i directed her to this thread and she was surprised and figures that next year when she comes down her without her husband to visit her parents, she had better follow the instructions and information lisa posted.

but she reiterated she had 0 issues flying from logan on AA on jan 30.
]

You are very welcome. :) The more research I did there more info there was out there.

Suffice to say that each country has different requirements. I cannot specifically find those for Aruba, but imo, if you have a notorized authorization from the parent for travel as well as insurance info AND notorized permission for a child's care in an emergency you should be fine.


If in doubt you can always phone your airline. As with even passports discrepancies as they do sometimes occur with "names", it is they who ultimately determine whether or not you even step foot on the airplane.

Let google be your friend. :)

Arubalisa
02-02-2010, 10:50 AM
but she reiterated she had 0 issues flying from logan on AA on jan 30.
We never had anyone ask for verification or I.D. other than passports when we traveled with our foster child. Her mother did not grant permission for her [the child] to travel, but the judge was the one who "gets to" decide. He granted the court order. Never would we have wanted to take the chance that we were asked for documents and could not produce them as back up.

My brother, a divorced father, always travels with a letter from his ex-wife. He too has never been asked to see it, but imagine the kids standing on line at Aruban immigrations and the father being asked documentation and not having it? Like I said, why take the chance?

Without the "official" paperwork, airlines and governments have no way of determining parentage and custody.

A friend sent this to me late yesterday,
"Very important to have documentation for minor child that is not your own and for your child where parents are no longer together. We learned the hard way on our first trip to Aruba. My husband's son brought a friend. We had permission from my stepson's mother and his friend's mother. The friend's father had not been in the picture since he was young. Because we did not have a document stating mother had sole custody he could not go with us. We changed his flight to the next day and his mother took him to airport with documentation for him to board plane. "

arubaerin
04-16-2011, 10:01 AM
I am going to Aruba next Friday. My daughter is bringing a friend. They are both 16 and I am wondering if anyone knows if I have to bring special documentation from her parents to leave the USA with her. I just do not want to show up at the airport and run into problems because she is underage and not a family member. Thank you :)

corona
04-16-2011, 10:27 AM
We've taken our 13 yr old niece and our son's friend when he was 17 to Aruba. In both cases, we got parental consent forms from both parents, as well as medical and dental consent forms. We downloaded free forms from the internet, and they had to be filled out by the parents, signed, and notarized. We had all the papers at hand with their passports in case of inquiry.



For any international travel with children, I strongly recommend, where applicable, consent forms from a current or former spouse, or parents of unrelated children. Beyond border crossings, you would also need some of these documents in the event you had to find medical treatment for a child. International authorities are especially sensitive these days to spousal abductions and other hassles involving child custody, and although your chances of encountering a problem are slim, when you do run into one, it can be huge. An ounce of prevention...

http://www.smartertravel.com/travel-advice/important-documents-for-traveling-with-children.html?id=2402472

arubaerin
04-16-2011, 10:38 AM
Thank you!!!

corona
04-16-2011, 10:50 AM
You're welcome. Even if you're not asked for documentation, I think you'll feel better having it. At least for me, I feel a little nervous whenever I'm leaving the country, hoping I have everything in order.

A couple of tips, if you don't mind me adding, from our experience.

We might have allowed the boys more freedom then you will the girls, as they were a year older and, well, boys. We rented two cell phones, so that when they wanted to go over to the mall, grab a bite to eat at fast food, or to see their friends who were also on spring break, but at the resort next over, we were able to stay in contact.

We had copies of everything. I'll admit to being a little overboard about about paperwork, but I come by it honestly from organizing 50+ Boy Scouts to away summer camps for several years. I made sure the parents of the kids had photo copies of all of our passports, and I also carried photo copies of them, as well as the passports, but separately.

Have a great time on your vacation.

Arubalisa
04-16-2011, 11:12 AM
http://www.ilrg.com/forms/auth-foreigntravel.html (http://www.ilrg.com/forms/auth-foreigntravel.html) AUTHORIZATION FOR FOREIGN TRAVEL WITH MINOR

http://www.ilrg.com/forms/auth-minormed.html (http://www.ilrg.com/forms/auth-minormed.html) AUTHORIZATION FOR MINOR'S MEDICAL TREATMENT

Important documents for traveling with children: US (http://www.smartertravel.com/travel-advice/important-documents-for-traveling-with-children.html?id=2402472)Customs & Border Protection (http://www.smartertravel.com/travel-advice/important-documents-for-traveling-with-children.html?id=2402472)

http://www.aruba.com/forum/images/icons/icon2.gif Traveling with children - Child traveling with one parent or someone who is not a parent or legal guardian (https://help.cbp.gov/app/answers/detail/a_id/268)

Andrea J.
04-16-2011, 01:05 PM
also too
the minor child could also bring a credit card (parent's card with the child as authorized user)
in the event of a medical emergency, the parent's will be the one's that will be charged.
(not the guardians that are on the trip...the guardians will not have to look for reimbursement from the parents)

chouth
04-16-2011, 10:51 PM
I think the US passport website answers these questions

Andrea J.
04-16-2011, 11:27 PM
the US passport site http://travel.state.gov/abduction/prevention/prevention/prevention_2873.html

gives information about minor children and passport info for them

there is also a bunch of info re: abductions



I think the US passport website answers these questions

Randi
04-17-2011, 09:46 AM
Our children have travelled many times without us to Aruba (meeting us there) while under the age of 18. Sometimes two siblings travelling together but one is underage. We have had proper travel documents done each time and they have been asked for the documents. Although this only happened once or twice it was good that they had them.
In Canada, with the exception of Quebec, there are no notories so we had a lawyer friend of ours prepare it for us. He made sure he had his "seal" on it. The letter included the child's routing plus the fact that he was joining us and traveling home with us too. Signed by both of us.
When I have traveled with minor children without DH, I got asked for my travel document twice.
When taking minor children with us, I also took parental letters from a lawyer plus a letter from parents allowing me to make any necessary medical decisions on their behalf. Got asked once for that too.

Multiple original copies were made and one was kept with lawyer (with his contact info), one with the minor child, one with each parent. Contact information was included for non travelling parent(s).